A report on Congregationalism in the United States

The steeple of North Church, a historic Congregational church in Portsmouth, New Hampshire
Pilgrims Going to Church by George Henry Boughton (1867)
Recreation of Plymouth's fort and first church meeting house at Plimoth Plantation
The Old Ship Church, a Puritan meetinghouse in Hingham, Massachusetts. The plain style reflects the Calvinist values of the Puritans.
Campus of Harvard University, ca. 1821-1823
Old South Meeting House, one of the churches where George Whitefield preached while in Boston in 1740.
Portrait of Jonathan Edwards, revivalist and theologian
Charles Chauncy was an influential liberal theologian and opponent of New Light revivalism.
The Congregational Church of Austinburg, organized in 1801, is the second oldest Congregational church in Ohio and the oldest in the Western Reserve. The current building dates to 1877.
Kawaiahaʻo Church, known as the "Westminster Abbey of Hawaii."
Revivalist and social reformer Lyman Beecher served both Congregational and Presbyterian churches during his ministry.
Park Street Church in Boston, c. 1890
Allin Congregational Church, built in 1819, lost the Dedham case.
Andover Theological Seminary, established in 1807
United Congregational Church in Newport, Rhode Island
Coral Gables Congregational Church in Florida

Congregationalism in the United States consists of Protestant churches in the Reformed tradition that have a congregational form of church government and trace their origins mainly to Puritan settlers of colonial New England.

- Congregationalism in the United States
The steeple of North Church, a historic Congregational church in Portsmouth, New Hampshire

56 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Jonathan Edwards (theologian)

8 links

200px
Monument in Enfield, Connecticut commemorating the location where Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God was preached. The monument is on the grounds of Enfield Montessori School.
200px
Engraving of Edwards by R Babson & J Andrews

Jonathan Edwards (October 5, 1703 – March 22, 1758) was an American revivalist preacher, philosopher, and Congregationalist theologian.

Samuel Hopkins, proponent of New Divinity

New England theology

8 links

Samuel Hopkins, proponent of New Divinity

New England theology (or Edwardsianism) designates a school of theology which grew up among the Congregationalists of New England, originating in the year 1732, when Jonathan Edwards began his constructive theological work, culminating a little before the American Civil War, declining afterwards, and rapidly disappearing after the year 1880.

First Great Awakening

6 links

Series of Christian revivals that swept Britain and its thirteen North American colonies in the 1730s and 1740s.

Series of Christian revivals that swept Britain and its thirteen North American colonies in the 1730s and 1740s.

Monument in Enfield, Connecticut commemorating the location where Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God was preached
Philadelphia's Second Presbyterian Church, ministered by New Light Gilbert Tennent, was built between 1750 and 1753 after the split between Old and New Side Presbyterians.

In the American colonies the Awakening caused the Congregational and Presbyterian churches to split, while it strengthened both the Methodist and Baptist denominations.

United Church of Christ

5 links

Congregational Church in Connecticut.
South Parish Congregational Church and Parish House in Augusta, Maine in 2013.
First Congregational Church in Springfield, Massachusetts.
First Congregational Church of Long Beach, California.
Old South Church, Boston.
"God Is Still Speaking" banner on a UCC church in Rochester, Minnesota

The United Church of Christ (UCC) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination based in the United States, with historical and confessional roots in the Congregational, Calvinist, Lutheran, and Anabaptist traditions, and with approximately 4,800 churches and 773,500 members.

North Congregational Church in Farmington Hills, Michigan, United States.

Congregational church

4 links

Congregational churches (also Congregationalist churches; Congregationalism) are Protestant churches in the Calvinist tradition practising congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs.

Congregational churches (also Congregationalist churches; Congregationalism) are Protestant churches in the Calvinist tradition practising congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs.

North Congregational Church in Farmington Hills, Michigan, United States.
A Catalogue of the Several Sects and Opinions in England and other Nations: With a briefe Rehearsall of their false and dangerous Tenents, propaganda broadsheet denouncing English Dissenters from 1647.
Elsternwick Congregational Church (1894–1977); Orrong Road, Elsternwick, Victoria, Australia
The London Missionary Society preaching to native peoples of Oceania
William Ellis preaching to the Natives, Hawaii, c. 1823
A Congregational church in Middlebury, Vermont

Congregationalism in the United States traces its origins to the Puritans of New England, who wrote the Cambridge Platform of 1648 to describe the autonomy of the church and its association with others.

Gallery of famous 17th-century Puritan theologians: Thomas Gouge, William Bridge, Thomas Manton, John Flavel, Richard Sibbes, Stephen Charnock, William Bates, John Owen, John Howe and Richard Baxter

Puritans

5 links

The Puritans were English Protestants in the 16th and 17th centuries who sought to purify the Church of England of Roman Catholic practices, maintaining that the Church of England had not been fully reformed and should become more Protestant.

The Puritans were English Protestants in the 16th and 17th centuries who sought to purify the Church of England of Roman Catholic practices, maintaining that the Church of England had not been fully reformed and should become more Protestant.

Gallery of famous 17th-century Puritan theologians: Thomas Gouge, William Bridge, Thomas Manton, John Flavel, Richard Sibbes, Stephen Charnock, William Bates, John Owen, John Howe and Richard Baxter
The Westminster Assembly, which saw disputes on Church polity in England (Victorian history painting by John Rogers Herbert).
Interior of the Old Ship Church, a Puritan meetinghouse in Hingham, Massachusetts. Puritans were Calvinists, so their churches were unadorned and plain.
Death's head, Granary Burial Ground. A typical example of early Funerary art in Puritan New England
Polemical popular print with a Catalogue of Sects, 1647.
The Snake in the Grass or Satan Transform'd to an Angel of Light, title page engraved by Richard Gaywood, ca. 1660
Pilgrims Going to Church by George Henry Boughton (1867)
Cotton Mather, influential New England Puritan minister, portrait by Peter Pelham
1659 public notice in Boston deeming Christmas illegal
Quaker Mary Dyer led to execution on Boston Common, 1 June 1660, by an unknown 19th century artist
Second version of The Puritan, a late 19th-century sculpture by Augustus Saint-Gaudens
Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland

The New England Congregationalists were also adamant that they were not separating from the Church of England.

First Congregational Church, an NACCC church in Ceredo, West Virginia.

National Association of Congregational Christian Churches

3 links

First Congregational Church, an NACCC church in Ceredo, West Virginia.

The National Association of Congregational Christian Churches (NACCC) is an association of about 400 churches providing fellowship for and services to churches from the Congregational tradition.

Charles Chauncy, clergyman and president of Harvard from 1654–1672, was an outspoken opponent of the Half-Way Covenant.

Half-Way Covenant

3 links

Charles Chauncy, clergyman and president of Harvard from 1654–1672, was an outspoken opponent of the Half-Way Covenant.
Increase Mather initially opposed the Half-Way Covenant but was persuaded to support it.

The Half-Way Covenant was a form of partial church membership adopted by the Congregational churches of colonial New England in the 1660s.

TheCall rally in 2008, Washington, D.C., with the United States Capitol in the background

Evangelicalism in the United States

3 links

Movement among Protestant Christians who believe in the necessity of being born again, emphasize the importance of evangelism, and affirm traditional Protestant teachings on the authority as well as the historicity of the Bible.

Movement among Protestant Christians who believe in the necessity of being born again, emphasize the importance of evangelism, and affirm traditional Protestant teachings on the authority as well as the historicity of the Bible.

TheCall rally in 2008, Washington, D.C., with the United States Capitol in the background
National Association of Evangelicals works to foster cooperation among U.S. evangelical churches
Jonathan Edwards was the most influential evangelical theologian in America during the 18th century
Depiction of a camp meeting
Charles Grandison Finney, the most prominent revivalist of the Second Great Awakening
Collection box for the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society, circa 1850.
John Nelson Darby, considered to be the father of modern Dispensationalism
Dwight Moody, founder of the Moody Bible Institute
Cyrus Scofield, author of the Scofield Reference Bible
Scofield Bible, 1917 edition
Congregation at Angelus Temple during 14-hour Holy Ghost service led by Aimee Semple McPherson in Los Angeles, California in 1942.
Services at the Pentecostal Church of God in Lejunior, Kentucky, 1946
Mushroom cloud from the Trinity test, the first test of a nuclear bomb
Evangelical revivalist Billy Graham in Duisburg, Germany, 1954
Socially conservative evangelical Protestantism has a major cultural influence in the Bible Belt, an area that covers almost all of the Southern United States, and includes all of the states that fought against the Union in the American Civil War.
An event at Texas megachurch Gateway Church's 114 Southlake Campus
Jerry Falwell, founder of the Moral Majority
Average surface air temperatures from 2011 to 2021 compared to the 1956–1976 average

Within their Congregational churches, Puritans promoted experimental or experiential religion, arguing that saving faith required an inward transformation.

A sign of the Unitarian Universalist Association in Rochester, Minnesota. Unitarianism in the English-speaking world largely evolved into a pluralistic liberal religious movement, while retaining its distinctiveness in continental Europe and elsewhere.

Unitarianism

3 links

Nontrinitarian Christian theological movement that believes that the God in Christianity is one singular person.

Nontrinitarian Christian theological movement that believes that the God in Christianity is one singular person.

A sign of the Unitarian Universalist Association in Rochester, Minnesota. Unitarianism in the English-speaking world largely evolved into a pluralistic liberal religious movement, while retaining its distinctiveness in continental Europe and elsewhere.
Ferenc Dávid holding his speech at the Diet of Torda, The Kingdom of Hungary in 1568 (today Turda, Romania) by Aladár Körösfői-Kriesch (1896)
"God is One" (Egy az Isten) stained glass window in a Unitarian church in Budapest, Hungary
Fausto Sozzini was an Italian theologian who helped define Unitarianism and also served the Polish Brethren church
Constantine I burning Arian books, illustration from a book of canon law, c. 825
First Unitarian Meeting House in Madison, Wisconsin, designed by Unitarian Frank Lloyd Wright
The Dârjiu fortified church, a 13th-century fortified church belonging to the Unitarian Church of Transylvania. This is the only Unitarian fortified church in Transylvania which is on the UNESCO's World Heritage List.
Newington Green Unitarian Church in London, England. Built in 1708, this is the oldest nonconformist church in London still in use.
Whitney Young, executive director of the National Urban League (1961–1971), and Unitarian Universalist.
A Unitarian Assembly in Louisville, Kentucky
Sir Isaac Newton held Arian views
Frances Ellen Watkins Harper was an abolitionist, journalist, and suffragist associated with both American Unitarianism and the African Methodist Episcopal Church.

A theological battle with the Congregational Churches resulted in the formation of the American Unitarian Association at Boston in 1825.