New Amsterdam, centered in the eventual Lower Manhattan, in 1664, the year England took control and renamed it "New York"
New York was dominated by Iroquoian (purple) and Algonquian (pink) tribes.
Fort George and the City of New York c. 1731. Royal Navy ships of the line are seen guarding what would become New York Harbor.
A map of the Connecticut, New Haven, and Saybrook colonies
New Amsterdam, present-day Lower Manhattan, 1660
Columbia University was founded by royal charter in 1754 under the name of King's College.
A 1799 map of Connecticut which shows The Oblong, from Low's Encyclopaedia
New York and neighboring provinces, by Claude Joseph Sauthier, 1777
The Battle of Long Island, the largest battle of the American Revolution, took place in Brooklyn in 1776.
View of New London in 1854
British general John Burgoyne surrenders at Saratoga in 1777
Broadway follows the Native American Wickquasgeck Trail through Manhattan.
1895 map from Rand McNally
1800 map of New York from Low's Encyclopaedia
The current 5 boroughs of Greater New York as they appeared in 1814. Bronx was in Westchester County, Queens County included modern Nassau County, Kings County had 6 towns, one of which was Brooklyn, New York City is shown by hatching in southern New York County on the island of Manhattan, and Richmond County on Staten Island.
The Erie Canal at Lockport, New York, in 1839
A construction worker atop the Empire State Building as it was being built in 1930. The Chrysler Building is behind him.
Köppen climate types of Connecticut, using 1991–2020 climate normals.
Flight 175 hitting the South Tower on September11, 2001
Manhattan's Little Italy, Lower East Side, circa 1900
Connecticut's population density map
Flooding on AvenueC in Lower Manhattan caused by Hurricane Sandy
The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement
A welcome sign on I-91 in Enfield.
New York is bordered by six U.S. states, two Great Lakes, and the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec.
United Airlines Flight 175 hits the South Tower of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.
The Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge, locally known as the QBridge, carries ten lanes over the Quinnipiac River in New Haven, along the Connecticut Turnpike.
Enveloped by the Atlantic Ocean and Long Island Sound, New York City and Long Island alone are home to about eleven million residents conjointly.
The core of the New York City metropolitan area, with Manhattan Island at its center
A Metro-North Railroad New Haven Line train leaving Stamford Station
Lake-effect snow is a major contributor to heavy snowfall totals in western New York, including the Tug Hill region.
Bradley International Airport, the state's largest
Two major state parks (in green) are the Adirondack Park (north) and the Catskill Park (south).
Lower and Midtown Manhattan, as seen by a SkySat satellite in 2017
The Connecticut State Capitol in downtown Hartford
The Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor is a symbol of the United States and its ideals.
Central Park in Winter by Raymond Speers, in Munsey's Magazine, February 1900
Connecticut political party registration 1958–2012, marked with presidential influence
The African Burial Ground National Monument in Lower Manhattan
Flushing Meadows–Corona Park was used in both the 1939 and 1964 New York World's Fair, with the Unisphere as the centerpiece of the latter and which remains today.
Yale's motto means “light and truth.”
Map of the counties in New York
The Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island in New York Harbor is a symbol of the United States and its ideals of freedom, democracy, and opportunity.
University of Connecticut, the state's main public university
New York population distribution map. New York's population is primarily concentrated in the Greater New York area, including New York City and Long Island.
View of The Pond and Midtown Manhattan from the Gapstow Bridge in Central Park, one of the world's most visited tourist attractions, in 2019
Lime Rock, a home of the American Le Mans Series
The Stonewall Inn in the gay village of Greenwich Village, Lower Manhattan, site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots, the cradle of the modern LGBT rights movement
California sea lions play at the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
Yale Bowl during "The Game" between Yale and Harvard. The Bowl was also the home of the NFL's New York Giants in 1973–74.
258x258px
A map of racial distribution in New York, 2010 U.S. census. Each dot is 25 people:
The Charter Oak
The main laboratory building of the IBM Watson Research Center is located in Yorktown Heights, New York.
The landmark Neo-Gothic Roman Catholic St. Patrick's Cathedral, Midtown Manhattan
The {{USS|Nautilus|SSN-571}}
Times Square in Midtown Manhattan, hub of the Broadway theater district, a media center, and one of the world's busiest pedestrian intersections
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish residents in Brooklyn. Brooklyn has the largest Jewish community in the United States, with approximately 600,000 individuals.
"I Love New York"
The Islamic Cultural Center of New York in Upper Manhattan was the first mosque built in New York City.
CMA CGM Theodore Roosevelt, the largest container ship to enter the Port of New York and New Jersey as of September7, 2017
Ganesh Temple in Flushing, Queens, is the oldest Hindu temple in the Western Hemisphere.
Harris Hall of the City College of New York, a public college of the City University of New York
The New York Stock Exchange, by a significant margin the world's largest stock exchange per market capitalization of its listed companies, at US$23.1 trillion as of April 2018. Pictured is the exchange's building on Wall Street.
Butler Library at Columbia University
The Deutsche Bank Center as viewed from Central Park West
University of Rochester
Times Square is the hub of the Broadway theater district and a media center. It also has one of the highest annual attendance rates of any tourist attraction in the world, estimated at 50 million.
South campus of the University at Buffalo, the flagship of the State University of New York
The I Love New York logo, designed by Milton Glaser in 1977
The New York City Subway is one of the world's busiest, serving more than five million passengers per average weekday.
Rockefeller Center is home to NBC Studios.
Grand Central Terminal in New York City
Times Square Studios, home of Good Morning America
John F. Kennedy Airport in Queens, the busiest international air passenger gateway to the United States
Butler Library at Columbia University, described as one of the most beautiful college libraries in the United States
The New York State Capitol in Albany
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of both New York University (NYU) and its Greenwich Village neighborhood
New York State Court of Appeals
New York-Presbyterian Hospital, affiliated with Columbia University and Cornell University, the largest hospital and largest private employer in New York City and one of the world's busiest
Kirsten Gillibrand and Chuck Schumer, New York's U.S. Senators
The New York Police Department (NYPD) is the largest police force in the United States.
Kathy Hochul (D), the 57th Governor of New York
Police officers of New York Police Department (NYPD)
Yankee Stadium in The Bronx
The Fire Department of New York (FDNY) is the largest municipal fire department in the United States.
Koppen climate of New York
The Stephen A. Schwarzman Headquarters Building of the New York Public Library, at 5th Avenue and 42nd Street
The fast-paced streets of New York City, January 2020
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, part of Museum Mile, is one of the largest museums in the world.
Smorgasburg opened in 2011 as an open-air food market and is part of the Brooklyn Flea.
As of 2012, the city had about 6,000 hybrid taxis (shown) in service, the largest number of any city in North America.
New York City Hall is the oldest City Hall in the United States that still houses its original governmental functions.
The New York County Courthouse houses the New York Supreme Court and other offices.
Eric Adams, the current and 110th Mayor of New York City
New York City is home to the two busiest train stations in the U.S., including Grand Central Terminal.
The New York City Subway is the world's largest rapid transit system by number of stations.
The Port Authority Bus Terminal, the world's busiest bus station, at 8th Avenue and 42nd Street
John F. Kennedy Airport in Queens, the busiest international air passenger gateway to the United States
The Staten Island Ferry shuttles commuters between Manhattan and Staten Island.
Yellow medallion taxicabs are widely recognized icons of the city.
8th Avenue, looking northward ("uptown"). Most streets and avenues in Manhattan's grid plan incorporate a one-way traffic configuration.
The George Washington Bridge, connecting Upper Manhattan (background) from Fort Lee, New Jersey across the Hudson River, is the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge.
The growing skyline of Long Island City, Queens (background),<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-10-30/nyc-s-fastest-growing-neighborhood-gets-180-million-investment|title=NYC's Fastest-Growing Neighborhood Gets $180 Million Investment|first=Henry|last=Goldman|date=October 30, 2018|publisher=Bloomberg L.P|access-date=October 30, 2018}}</ref> facing the East River and Manhattan in May 2017
The Grand Concourse in the Bronx, foreground, with Manhattan in the background in February 2018
St. George, Staten Island as seen from the Staten Island Ferry, the world's busiest passenger-only ferry system, shuttling passengers between Manhattan and Staten Island
The Asia gate entrance to the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
The Spanish Harlem Orchestra. New York City is home to nearly 3 million Latino Americans, the largest Hispanic population of any city outside Latin America and Spain.
The Financial District of Lower Manhattan including Wall Street, the world's principal financial center

New York, often called New York City (NYC) to distinguish it from the State of New York, is the most populous city in the United States.

- New York City

It is often called New York State to distinguish it from its largest city, New York City.

- New York (state)

It is bordered by Rhode Island to the east, Massachusetts to the north, New York to the west, and Long Island Sound to the south.

- Connecticut

The state of New York is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south, and Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Vermont to the east; it has a maritime border with Rhode Island, east of Long Island, as well as an international border with the Canadian provinces of Quebec to the north and Ontario to the northwest.

- New York (state)

For the winter of 1778–79, General George Washington decided to split the Continental Army into three divisions encircling New York City, where British General Sir Henry Clinton had taken up winter quarters.

- Connecticut

New York City also has an extensive web of freeways and parkways, which link the city's boroughs to each other and to North Jersey, Westchester County, Long Island, and southwestern Connecticut through various bridges and tunnels.

- New York City

9 related topics with Alpha

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Long Island Native American settlements

Long Island

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Long Island Native American settlements
Painting of three Lenape Indians, circa 1860s
The Old House, built in 1699 in Cutchogue, January 2008
The Brooklyn Bridge, the first of multiple crossings constructed across the East River, connects Long Island with Manhattan Island (background).
Oheka Castle, a Gold Coast estate in West Hills, is the second-largest private residence in the country
Montauk Point at Long Island's rural eastern tip, January 2013
The four counties of Long Island include two independent counties (Nassau and Suffolk) and two New York City boroughs (Brooklyn and Queens)
Satellite imagery showing the New York metropolitan area at night. Long Island is highly developed and densely populated, extending approximately 120 mi eastward from the central core of Manhattan
The intersection of Long Island, Manhattan, and the continental mainland taken from space by the Space Shuttle Columbia, 1993
The bluffs of Long Island's North Shore, November 2012
Cumulus congestus clouds over Long Island on a summer afternoon, July 2013
Clear skies in autumn over the Great Peconic Bay, with the Atlantic Ocean as its primary inflow, separating the North Fork and South Fork at the East End of Long Island, November 2007
Stripped Rockaway Beach Boardwalk after Hurricane Sandy, November 2012
A mansion on Long Island's wealthy Gold Coast, which along with The Hamptons and Brooklyn's western waterfront (facing Manhattan) provides Long Island with some of the most expensive residential real estate in the world.
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory on the North Shore of Nassau County is an internationally renowned biomedical research facility and home to eight scientists awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
Brookhaven National Laboratory a major U.S. Department of Energy research institution, July 2010
A commemorative half-dollar coin issued in 1936 for Long Island's tercentenary
Chaminade High School in Mineola, April 2013
The Student Activities Center at Stony Brook University, August 2020
Blodgett Hall at Adelphi University in Garden City, March 2022
Northwell Health at Jones Beach Theater in Wantagh, March 2007
The Big Duck in Flanders, August 2018
A winery and tasting room in a 1690 farmhouse near Stony Brook, May 2014
Citi Field, home of the New York Mets, in Queens, September 2011
Barclays Center in Brooklyn, home of the Brooklyn Nets, October 2016
The Stony Brook Seawolves homecaming game, September 2012
Bethpage Ballpark, home of the Long Island Ducks minor league baseball team, July 2011
Preparing for a horse race at Belmont Park, home of the Belmont Stakes, the final leg of the Triple Crown, April 2005
John F. Kennedy Airport in Queens, the busiest international air passenger gateway to the United States, January 2013
A 7 train in Queens, April 2007
A schematic map of the LIRR system
A Nassau Inter-County Express bus, June 2019
Long Island Expressway in Nassau County

Long Island is a largely urbanized and densely populated island in the southeastern geographical area of the U.S. state of New York, part of the New York metropolitan area.

The island comprises four counties; Kings and Queens counties (the New York City boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens, respectively) and Nassau County share the western third of the island, while Suffolk County occupies the eastern two thirds.

North of the island is Long Island Sound, across which lie Westchester County, New York, and the state of Connecticut.

Italian Americans

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Italian Americans (italoamericani or italo-americani, ) are Americans who have full or partial Italian ancestry.

Italian Americans (italoamericani or italo-americani, ) are Americans who have full or partial Italian ancestry.

Landing of Cristopher Columbus (12 October 1492), painting by John Vanderlyn
Amerigo Vespucci, Italian explorer from whose name the term "America" is derived
Verrazzano's voyage of 1524. The Italian explorer was the first documented European to enter New York Harbor and the Hudson River.
Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge in New York City is named for Giovanni da Verrazzano.
Philip Mazzei, Italian physician and promoter of liberty, whose phrase: "All men are by nature equally free and independent" was incorporated into the United States Declaration of Independence
Statue of Francis Vigo
Review of the Garibaldi Guard by President Abraham Lincoln
The Garibaldi-Meucci Museum on Staten Island
The "Bambinos" of Little Italy - Syracuse, New York in 1899
Mulberry Street, along which New York City's Little Italy is centered. Lower East Side, circa 1900.
Italian immigrants entering the United States via Ellis Island in 1905
The Monongah mining disaster of 1907 described as "the worst mining disaster in American history" the official death toll stood at 362, 171 of them Italian migrants.
Little Italy in Chicago, 1909
Italian-Hawaiian woman with a poi bowl, 1909
Joe Petrosino in 1909
Michael Valente, recipient of the highest military decoration, the Medal of Honor, for his actions during World War I
Fiorello La Guardia with Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1938
Italian American WPA workers doing roadwork in Dorchester, Boston, 1930s
Rudolph Valentino with Alice Terry in The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, 1921
Historical advertisement of an Italian American restaurant, between circa 1930 and 1945
Italian-American veterans of all wars memorial, Southbridge, Massachusetts
Frank Capra receiving the Distinguished Service Medal from General George C. Marshall, 1945
Enrico Fermi, architect of the nuclear age, was awarded the 1938 Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on induced radioactivity.
Dominic Salvatore Don Gentile on the wing of his P-51B, 'Shangri-La'. Also known as "Ace of Aces", he was a World War II USAAF pilot who surpassed Eddie Rickenbacker's World War I record of 26 downed aircraft.
Joe DiMaggio, considered one of the greatest baseball players of all time, in 1951
Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin in 1963
Martin Scorsese and Francis Ford Coppola, filmmakers whose body of work explores themes such as Italian-American identity, here together with Steven Spielberg and George Lucas, are among the greatest modern directors.
Wally Schirra, one of the earliest NASA astronauts to enter into space (1962), taking part in the Mercury Seven program and later Gemini and Apollo programs
Columbus Day in Salem, Massachusetts in 1892
1973 U.S. postage stamp featuring Amadeo Giannini
Enrico Fermi between Franco Rasetti (left) and Emilio Segrè in academic dress
A fourteen year old Italian girl working at a paper-box factory (1913)
The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in 1911. The victims were almost exclusively Jewish and Italian female immigrants.
Mother Cabrini
An Italian immigrant making an American breakfast aided by instructional materials from the YMCA
Lawrence Ferlinghetti
Don DeLillo
Paola Corso
Danielle Trussoni
St. Anthony of Padua Church in New York was established in 1859 as the first parish in the United States formed specifically to serve the Italian immigrant community.
Our Lady of Pompeii Church in New York was founded in 1892 as a national parish to serve Italian-American immigrants who settled in Greenwich Village.
Emilio Segrè, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1959, was among the Italian Jews who emigrated to the United States after Mussolini's regime implemented an anti-semitic legislation.
Italian Cultural and Community Center (Logue House) in the Houston Museum District
A war-time poster
Feast of San Gennaro in New York
President Barack Obama participates in an interview with Jay Leno during a taping of "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno" at the NBC Studios in Burbank, Calif., Oct. 24, 2012.
Italian American Museum of Los Angeles
Sacco and Vanzetti in handcuffs
One of the largest mass lynchings in American history involved eleven Italian immigrants in New Orleans in 1891.
Top ancestry by U.S. county. Dark blue indicates counties where persons of Italian ancestry form a plurality.
Little Italy in Manhattan after Italy won the 2006 FIFA World Cup
Much of Philadelphia's Italian population is in South Philadelphia, and is well known for its Italian Market.
The American and Italian flags in Boston's North End
St. Lucy's Church in Newark
Northside in Syracuse
Feast of the Assumption in Cleveland's Little Italy
Gateway to Ybor City on 7th. Ave near the Nick Nuccio Parkway
Sts. Peter and Paul Church in North Beach, San Francisco

The first Italian to be registered as residing in the area corresponding to the current U.S.A. was Pietro Cesare Alberti, a Venetian seaman who, in 1635, settled in what would eventually become New York City.

And a majority of Italian voters living in mostly white rural Upstate New York backed black Democratic nominee Basil A. Paterson for Lieutenant Governor of New York in 1970—but not Italian voters who lived in racially diverse metro New York City.

2) Connecticut 18.7%

Long Island Sound is shown highlighted in pink between Connecticut (to the north) and Long Island (to the south).

Long Island Sound

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Long Island Sound is shown highlighted in pink between Connecticut (to the north) and Long Island (to the south).
Long Island Sound at night, as seen from space
The Watershed of Long Island Sound includes nearly all of Connecticut and western Massachusetts, large swathes of Vermont, New Hampshire and Rhode Island, along with relatively small areas of New York state. (The map is miscolored in two places: the area called "5" is part of the watershed, as is the area called "9" on Long Island; the line dividing Long Island is the southerly limit of the watershed, which includes only a small fraction of the island, along the northern coast)
Long Island Sound in Branford, Connecticut
Long Island Sound from Calf Pasture Beach in Norwalk, Connecticut

Long Island Sound is a marine sound and tidal estuary of the Atlantic Ocean, lying predominantly between the U.S. state of Connecticut to the north, and Long Island in New York to the south.

Cities on the New York side of the Sound include Rye, Glen Cove, New Rochelle, Larchmont and portions of Queens and the Bronx in New York City.

New Netherland

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17th-century colonial province of the Dutch Republic that was located on what is now the East Coast of the United States.

17th-century colonial province of the Dutch Republic that was located on what is now the East Coast of the United States.

New Netherland map published by Nicolaes Visscher II (1649–1702)
Map based on Adriaen Block's 1614 expedition to New Netherland, featuring the first use of the name. It was created by Dutch cartographers in the (ca. 1590s–1720s) and Netherlandish cartography (ca. 1570s–1670s).
New Netherland map published by Nicolaes Visscher II (1649–1702)
Map of New Netherland and New England, with north to the right
The West India House in Amsterdam, headquarters of the Dutch West India Company from 1623 to 1647
The storehouse of the Dutch West India Company in Amsterdam, built in 1642, became the headquarters of the board in 1647 because of financial difficulties after the loss of Dutch Brazil.
Map showing the area claimed by the Dutch in North-America and several Dutch settlements, against modern state boundaries
Map (c. 1639), Manhattan situated on the North River (North arrow pointing to the right)
St. Mark's Church in-the-Bowery, site of Stuyvesant's grave
Nicolaes Visscher I (1618–1679), Novi Belgii Novæque Angliæ, reprint of 1685 which is not a completely correct representation of the situation at the time. The border with New England had been adjusted to 50 mi west of the Fresh River, while the Lange Eylandt towns west of Oyster Bay were under Dutch jurisdiction.
Image of " " made in 1664, the year that it was surrendered to English forces under Richard Nicolls
The original settlement has grown into the largest metropolis in the United States, seen here in 2006
The Prinsenvlag or "Prince's Flag", featuring the blue, white, and orange of some flags in the region
The Noort Rivier was one of the three main rivers in New Netherland.

The claimed territories extended from the Delmarva Peninsula to southwestern Cape Cod, while the more limited settled areas are now part of the U.S. states of New York, New Jersey, Delaware, and Connecticut, with small outposts in Pennsylvania and Rhode Island.

It was during the early British colonial period that the New Netherlanders actually developed the land and society that had an enduring impact on the Capital District, the Hudson Valley, North Jersey, western Long Island, New York City, Fairfield County, and ultimately the United States.

The 20th Century Limited at Grand Central Terminal, c. 1952

Grand Central Terminal

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The 20th Century Limited at Grand Central Terminal, c. 1952
Midday pedestrian traffic in the Main Concourse
Floor plan of the main level of the terminal
Graybar Passage
The Oyster Bar ramps shown c. 1913. They were completely restored in 1998 with one change – lower walls on the pedestrian overpass.
Newsstand in the Biltmore Room, 2017
Central Cellars interior; the theater projection window is at the top left
MTA Police and lost-and-found offices
Floor plan of the Dining Level
The Vanderbilt Tennis Club's court
Rotary converter relics in the M42 basement
1913 map showing the space beneath Carey's barbershop
Baggage car mistakenly identified as Franklin D. Roosevelt's personal car, on display at the Danbury Railway Museum
Hospital room in the terminal, 1915
Glory of Commerce, a sculptural group by Jules-Félix Coutan
View of the station house looking northwest; the Main Concourse roof is visible in the building's center
The south facade features a set of three arched windows, with the Glory of Commerce sculpture at the top-center and the Vanderbilt statue at the bottom-center.
Frieze displaying the terminal's original logo
Illustration showing the viaduct as it approaches and wraps around Grand Central, 1944
Grand Central Post Office Annex in 1988
Passageway to the subway; the ramp at right leads to street level
Grand Central Depot
Grand Central Station, c. 1902
Proposal of the associated architects of Grand Central during its construction, 1905
Terminal and baggage building construction c. 1912
The MetLife Building was completed in 1963 above part of Grand Central Terminal.
The Main Concourse in 1986, featuring the Kodak Colorama, the illuminated clock, and two banks
Centennial celebration performance, 2013
East Side Access progress in 2014
Incline between concourses, showing the "whispering gallery" outside the Oyster Bar
Cutaway drawing from 1939, illustrating the use of ramps, express and suburban tracks, and the viaduct
Balloon loop visible behind Track 42
The Helmsley Building, in front of the MetLife Building, was built as part of Terminal City, a commercial and office district created above the tracks
MTA Police T3 scooters and GEM electric vehicles for patrol
The fire department's Taylor-Dunn personnel carrier and rescue truck
Platform at Track 34, commonly used in films
Saturday Night Live stage replica at a Museum of Broadcast Communications exhibition, 2018

Grand Central Terminal (GCT; also referred to as Grand Central Station or simply as Grand Central) is a commuter rail terminal located at 42nd Street and Park Avenue in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.

Through these lines, the terminal serves Metro-North commuters traveling to and from the Bronx in New York City; Westchester, Putnam, and Dutchess counties in New York; and Fairfield and New Haven counties in Connecticut.

English Americans

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English Americans, or Anglo-Americans, are Americans whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England.

English Americans, or Anglo-Americans, are Americans whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England.

England United States. Shows the first permanent English settlement of Jamestown in 1607.
Statue of John Smith for the first English settlement in Historic Jamestowne, Virginia.
The first self-governing document of Plymouth Colony. English Pilgrims signing the Mayflower Compact in 1620.
John Trumbull's famous painting, Declaration of Independence.
English language distribution in the United States.
American cultural icons, apple pie, baseball, and the American flag.
The First Thanksgiving at Plymouth Colony by English Pilgrims in October 1621.
Henry Chadwick’s early contributions to the development of the game is often called the "Father of Baseball".

The same 1909 data for each state (of the total European population only) of English ancestry were Connecticut 96.2%, Rhode Island 96.0%, Vermont 95.4%, Massachusetts 95.0%, New Hampshire 94.1%, Maine 93.1%, Virginia 85.0%, Maryland 84.0%, North Carolina 83.1%, South Carolina 82.4%, New York 78.2% and Pennsylvania 59.0%.

New York City (after the Duke of York )

Metro-North Railroad

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Marble Hill station on the Hudson Line
Northeast Corridor and New Haven Line in New Rochelle
An M7 train at on the Harlem Line.
A GE P32AC-DM locomotive arriving at
Metro-North maintenance train going through on the Hudson Line.

Metro-North Railroad, trading as MTA Metro-North Railroad, is a suburban commuter rail service run by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), a public authority of the U.S. state of New York and under contract with the Connecticut Department of Transportation.

Metro-North runs service between New York City and its northern suburbs in New York and Connecticut, including Port Jervis, Spring Valley, Poughkeepsie, Yonkers, New Rochelle, Mt. Vernon, White Plains, Southeast and Wassaic in New York and Stamford, New Canaan, Danbury, Bridgeport, Waterbury, and New Haven in Connecticut.

Notable Irish Americans

Irish Americans

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Irish Americans or Hiberno-Americans (Gael-Mheiriceánaigh) are Americans who have full or partial ancestry from Ireland.

Irish Americans or Hiberno-Americans (Gael-Mheiriceánaigh) are Americans who have full or partial ancestry from Ireland.

Notable Irish Americans
Charles Carroll, the sole Catholic signer of the U.S. Declaration of Independence, was the descendant of Irish nobility in County Tipperary. Signers Matthew Thornton, George Taylor were born in Ireland and were "Ulster" Scots, while Thomas Lynch Jr., for example, was Protestant; he was of Irish ancestry and retained a strong Irish identity.
"Leacht Cuimhneacháin na nGael", Irish famine memorial located on Penn's Landing, Philadelphia
Thomas Ambrose Butler, an Irish Catholic priest, was a leading voice in urging Irish immigrants to colonize Kansas
Gravestone in Boston Catholic cemetery erected in memory of County Roscommon native born shortly before the Great Famine
Population density of people born in Ireland, 1870; these were mostly Catholics; the older Scots Irish immigration is not shown.
U.S. President Grover Cleveland twisting the tail of the British Lion as Americans cheer in the Venezuelan crisis of 1895; cartoon in Puck by J.S. Pughe
American political cartoon by Thomas Nast titled "The Usual Irish Way of Doing Things", depicting a drunken Irishman lighting a powder keg and swinging a bottle. Published 2 September 1871 in Harper's Weekly
The Orange riot of 1871 as depicted in Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper. The view is at 25th Street in Manhattan looking south down Eighth Avenue.
St. Augustine's Church on fire. Anti-Irish, anti-Catholic Nativist riots in Philadelphia in 1844.
The mass hanging of Irish Catholic soldiers who joined the Mexican army
Officers and men of the Irish-Catholic 69th New York Volunteer Regiment attend church services at Fort Corcoran in 1861.
Irish Lass depiction in 1885.
Irish immigrants in Kansas City, Missouri, c. 1909
1862 song (Female versian)
1862 song that used the "No Irish Need Apply" slogan. It was copied from a similar London song.
New York Times want ad 1854—the only New York Times ad with NINA for men.
1882 illustration from Puck depicting Irish immigrants as troublemakers, as compared to those of other nationalities
St. Patrick's Cathedral, New York
Logo of the Boston Celtics basketball team
The Philadelphia Phillies started the tradition of wearing green uniforms on St. Patrick's day.
Two Irish stars: "Gentleman Jim" Corbett licks John L. Sullivan in 1892
Actor Tom Cruise descends from paternal Irish ("Cruise" and "O'Mara") lineage around County Dublin.
Irish Republican mural in South Boston, Massachusetts
The Chicago River, dyed green for the 2005 St. Patrick's Day celebration
1928 Democratic Presidential Nominee Al Smith was the first Irish Catholic nominee of a major political party.
Distribution of Irish Americans according to the 2000 Census
President John F. Kennedy in motorcade in Cork on June 27, 1963
President Ronald Reagan speaking to a large crowd in his ancestral home in Ballyporeen, Ireland, in 1984.
President Barack Obama greets local residents on Main Street in Moneygall, Ireland, May 23, 2011.

Many of the Famine immigrants to New York City required quarantine on Staten Island or Blackwell's Island and thousands died from typhoid fever or cholera for reasons directly or indirectly related to the Famine.

New York state has the most Irish speakers of the 50 states, and Massachusetts the highest percentage.

Regionally, the most Irish American states are Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont, Rhode Island, Delaware, Pennsylvania, and Connecticut, according to the U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey in 2013.

Radar image of Hurricane Sandy approaching the Jersey Shore

Hurricane Sandy

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The deadliest, most destructive, and strongest hurricane of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season.

The deadliest, most destructive, and strongest hurricane of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season.

Radar image of Hurricane Sandy approaching the Jersey Shore
The National Hurricane Center (NHC)'s forecast for the storm as of October 28, 2012
White House conference with FEMA and Department of Homeland Security in preparation for arrival of the hurricane.
A tilted satellite image of the storm on October 28, with most of the U.S. coastline artificially highlighted. The entire east coast is visible, with a cloudless Florida coast seen at the bottom of the image and the outline of the coast of Maine at the top right.
Airmen of the New Jersey National Guard's 108th Wing assemble before being sent to assist at various emergency shelters.
A downed tree in Cheltenham Township, Pennsylvania.
Special MTA service alerts, posted in subway stations on October 26, urged travelers to be alert for future evacuation orders or service suspension announcements.
The Brooklyn–Battery Tunnel remained flooded on the Tuesday morning after the storm.
Flooding in Marblehead, Massachusetts, caused by Hurricane Sandy on October 29.
Connecticut governor Dannel Malloy discusses the hurricane on the phone with President Obama on October 28 from the State Emergency Operations Center
Snowfall totals in the Appalachian mountain range (amount in inches)
Hurricane Sandy damage in Guantanamo Bay
Damage to Casino Pier in Seaside Heights, New Jersey
Storm total rainfall for Sandy (2012) across the United States
The 180-foot (55 m) sailing ship, Bounty, is shown nearly submerged during Hurricane Sandy in the Atlantic Ocean approximately 90 mi southeast of Hatteras, North Carolina on Monday, October 29, 2012.
Damaged road at Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge on Assateague Island
Flooding in Crisfield, Maryland
Before and after image of flooding caused by Hurricane Sandy at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge
Damage to Mantoloking, New Jersey
Downed tree in Kutztown, Pennsylvania
Manhattan suffered a widespread power outage during the storm.
Suomi NPP satellite imagery showing the power outages in New York and New Jersey on November 1 compared to October 21.
Damage from Hurricane Sandy to a house in Brooklyn, New York.
Snow from Hurricane Sandy in West Virginia
October 30, 2012, President Barack Obama visits the American Red Cross Digital Command Center following Hurricane Sandy
In Long Beach, New York, five years after the storm, homes were still being raised—lifted on temporary pilings so that permanent foundations could be put in.
President Barack Obama and New Jersey Governor Chris Christie talking to storm victims in Brigantine
A 2014 sign warned NYC commuters that the G train would shut down for repair due to 2012 Hurricane Sandy flooding. Several subway lines flooded by Hurricane Sandy would eventually require saltwater corrosion repair.

In the United States, Hurricane Sandy affected 24 states, including the entire eastern seaboard from Florida to Maine and west across the Appalachian Mountains to Michigan and Wisconsin, with particularly severe damage in New Jersey and New York.

Its storm surge hit New York City on October 29, flooding streets, tunnels and subway lines and cutting power in and around the city.

Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy partially activated the state's Emergency Operations Center on October 26 and signed a Declaration of Emergency the next day.