Connecticut River

ConnecticutUpper ValleyConnecticut River ValleyConnecticut ValleyConnecticut River Valley Flood Control CommissionUpper Connecticut River ValleyFresh RiverUpper Connecticut Valley1936 Connecticut River Floodlongest river
The Connecticut River is the longest river in the New England region of the United States, flowing roughly southward for 406 mi through four states.wikipedia
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New England

southern New EnglandNew EnglanderNew England region
The Connecticut River is the longest river in the New England region of the United States, flowing roughly southward for 406 mi through four states.
The Atlantic fall line lies close to the coast, which enabled numerous cities to take advantage of water power along the many rivers, such as the Connecticut River, which bisects the region from north to south.

Westfield River

WestfieldWestfield River Gorge
The Pocomtuc village of Agawam eventually became Springfield, situated on the Bay Path where the Connecticut River meets the western Westfield River and eastern Chicopee River.
The Westfield River is a major tributary of the Connecticut River located in the Berkshires and Pioneer Valley regions of western Massachusetts.

Long Island Sound

SoundLong Islandshoreline
It rises at the U.S. border with Quebec, Canada, and discharges at Long Island Sound.
Connecticut River - Old Saybrook

Vermont

VTState of VermontVt.
The region stretching from Springfield north to the New Hampshire and Vermont state borders fostered many agricultural Pocomtuc and Nipmuc settlements, with its soil enhanced by sedimentary deposits.
Thereafter, the nearby colonies, especially the provinces of New Hampshire and New York, disputed the extent of the area called the New Hampshire Grants to the west of the Connecticut River, encompassing present-day Vermont.

New Hampshire

NHState of New HampshireNew Hampshire, U.S.
The region stretching from Springfield north to the New Hampshire and Vermont state borders fostered many agricultural Pocomtuc and Nipmuc settlements, with its soil enhanced by sedimentary deposits.
Historically, New Hampshire was a major center for textile manufacturing, shoemaking, and papermaking, with Amoskeag Manufacturing Company in Manchester once being the largest cotton textile plant in the world, and numerous mills located along the various rivers in the state, including the Merrimack and Connecticut rivers.

Chicopee River

Chicopeeriver
The Pocomtuc village of Agawam eventually became Springfield, situated on the Bay Path where the Connecticut River meets the western Westfield River and eastern Chicopee River.
The Chicopee River is an 18.0 mi tributary of the Connecticut River in Metropolitan Springfield, Massachusetts, known for fast-moving water and its extraordinarily large basin: the Connecticut River's largest tributary basin.

Northfield, Massachusetts

NorthfieldEast Northfield, Massachusetts Northfield
The Western Abenaki (Sokoki) tribe lived in the Green Mountains region of Vermont but wintered as far south as the Northfield, Massachusetts area.
The Connecticut River runs through the town, dividing West Northfield from East Northfield and the village of Northfield, where the town hall is located.

Wethersfield, Connecticut

WethersfieldWethersfield, ConnWethersfield, Conn.
With this in mind, they founded Wethersfield, Connecticut in 1633, several miles south of the Dutch fort at Hartford.
It is located immediately south of Hartford along the Connecticut River.

Old Saybrook, Connecticut

Old SaybrookSaybrookFort Saybrook
The Pequots dominated a territory in the southernmost region of the Connecticut River valley, stretching roughly from the river's mouth at Old Saybrook, Connecticut northward to just below the Big Bend at Middletown.
The Saybrook Colony was established in late 1635 at the mouth of the Connecticut River, in what is today Old Saybrook and environs.

Mattabesset

MattabesecMattabesek
The Mattabesset (Tunxis) tribe takes its name from the place where its sachems ruled at the Connecticut River's Big Bend at Middletown, in a village sandwiched between the territories of the aggressive Pequots to the south and the more peaceable Mohegans to the north.
Mattabesset was a region and settlement once occupied by Algonquian language-speaking Native Americans called the Wangunk, along the Connecticut River.

Abenaki

AbenakisAbenaki nationAbnaki
The Western Abenaki (Sokoki) tribe lived in the Green Mountains region of Vermont but wintered as far south as the Northfield, Massachusetts area.
Cowasuck (also Cohass, Cohasiac, Koasek, Koasek, Coos – "People of the Pines"), lived in the upper Connecticut River Valley. Principal village: Cowass, near Newbury, Vermont.

Enfield Falls Canal

Enfield CanalEnfield FallsEnfield Rapids
The agricultural Pocomtuc tribe lived in unfortified villages alongside the Connecticut River north of the Enfield Falls on the fertile stretch of hills and meadows surrounding Springfield, Massachusetts. In 1614, Dutch explorer Adriaen Block became the first European to chart the Connecticut River, sailing as far north as Enfield Rapids.
Enfield Falls Canal (Windsor Locks Canal) is a canal that was built to circumvent the shallows at Enfield Falls (or Enfield Rapids) on the Connecticut River, between Hartford, Connecticut and Springfield, Massachusetts.

Pequot War

boiled over into warconflictcourse of war
The Mohegans dominated the region due north, where Hartford and its suburbs sit, particularly after allying themselves with the Colonists against the Pequots during the Pequot War of 1637.
In the 1630s, the Connecticut River Valley was in turmoil.

Saybrook Colony

SaybrookOld SaybrookSaybrooke
Hartford kept a fort at the mouth of the Connecticut River at Old Saybrook for protection against the Pequots, Wampanoags, Mohegans, and the New Netherland Colony.
The Saybrook Colony was established in late 1635 at the mouth of the Connecticut River in present-day Old Saybrook, Connecticut by John Winthrop, the Younger, son of John Winthrop, the Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

Massachusetts

MACommonwealth of MassachusettsMass.
The Pennacook tribe mediated many early disagreements between colonists and other Indian tribes, with a territory stretching roughly from the Massachusetts border with Vermont and New Hampshire, northward to the rise of the White Mountains in New Hampshire.
In 1641, Massachusetts expanded inland significantly, acquiring the Connecticut River Valley settlement of Springfield, which had recently disputed with, and defected from its original administrators, the Connecticut Colony.

Fort at Number 4

Fort No. 4Fort Number 4No. 4
The Fort at Number 4 in Charlestown, New Hampshire was the northernmost English settlement on the Connecticut River until the end of the French and Indian War in 1763.
The Fort at Number 4 was a fortification protecting Plantation Number 4, the northernmost British settlement along the Connecticut River in New Hampshire until after the French and Indian War.

Pocomtuc

Pocumtuc IndiansPocumtuck
The agricultural Pocomtuc tribe lived in unfortified villages alongside the Connecticut River north of the Enfield Falls on the fertile stretch of hills and meadows surrounding Springfield, Massachusetts.
The Pocumtuc (v. Pocomtuck) or Deerfield Indians were a prominent Native American tribe originally inhabiting western areas of what is now Massachusetts, especially around the confluence of the Deerfield and Connecticut Rivers in today's Franklin County.

Niantic people

NianticNianticsNehântick
They warred with and attempted to subjugate neighboring agricultural tribes such as the Western Niantics, while maintaining an uneasy stand-off with their rivals the Mohegans.
The Western Niantics were subject to the Pequots and lived just east of the mouth of the Connecticut River.

Pequots

PequotPequot tribeManhanset tribe
The Pequots dominated a territory in the southernmost region of the Connecticut River valley, stretching roughly from the river's mouth at Old Saybrook, Connecticut northward to just below the Big Bend at Middletown.
The theory of Pequot migration to the Connecticut River Valley can be traced to Rev. William Hubbard, who claimed in 1677 that the Pequots had invaded the region some time before the establishment of Plymouth Colony, rather than originating in the region.

New Hampshire Grants

New Hampshire grantdisputed territorya long-running dispute
The area that is now Vermont was claimed by both New Hampshire and New York, and was settled primarily through the issuance of land grants by New Hampshire Governor Benning Wentworth beginning in the 1740s.
The land grants, totaling about 135 (including 131 towns), were made on land claimed by New Hampshire west of the Connecticut River, territory that was also claimed by the Province of New York.

Adriaen Block

Block
In 1614, Dutch explorer Adriaen Block became the first European to chart the Connecticut River, sailing as far north as Enfield Rapids.
He is credited with being the first European to enter Long Island Sound and the Connecticut River, and to determine that Manhattan and Long Island are islands.

Iroquois

Six NationsIroquois ConfederacyFive Nations
Occasionally, these villages endured invasions from more aggressive confederated tribes living in New York, such as the Mohawk, Mahican, and Iroquois tribes.
In 1663, the Iroquois were at war with the Sokoki tribe of the upper Connecticut River.

Halls Stream

Hall's Stream
Trees cut adjacent to tributary streams including Perry Stream and Indian Stream in Pittsburg, New Hampshire, Halls Stream on the Quebec–New Hampshire border, Simms Stream, the Mohawk River, and the Nulhegan River basin in Essex County, Vermont, would be flushed into the main river by the release of water impounded behind splash dams.
Halls Stream or Rivière Hall is a 25.2 mi tributary of the Connecticut River in eastern North America.

Nulhegan River

Trees cut adjacent to tributary streams including Perry Stream and Indian Stream in Pittsburg, New Hampshire, Halls Stream on the Quebec–New Hampshire border, Simms Stream, the Mohawk River, and the Nulhegan River basin in Essex County, Vermont, would be flushed into the main river by the release of water impounded behind splash dams.
The Nulhegan River is a 15.1 mi tributary of the Connecticut River in Essex County, Vermont.

Windsor Locks, Connecticut

Windsor LocksWindsor Locks, CT
The Enfield Falls Canal was opened in 1829 to circumvent shallows around Enfield Falls, and the locks built for this canal gave their name to the town of Windsor Locks, Connecticut.
Located beside the Connecticut River and equidistant from the densely populated cities of Springfield, Massachusetts and Hartford, Connecticut, Windsor Locks is named for a set of canal locks that opened in 1829.