Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservativesUnionistConBritish Conservative PartyConservative and Unionist PartyUnionistsToryUnionist Party
The Conservative Party, officially the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a centre-right political party in the United Kingdom.wikipedia
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Liberal Party (UK)

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
The Conservative Party was founded in 1834 from the Tory Party—the Conservatives' colloquial name is "Tories"—and was one of two dominant political parties in the nineteenth century, along with the Liberal Party.
The Liberal Party was one of the two major parties in the United Kingdom with the opposing Conservative Party in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Winston Churchill

Sir Winston ChurchillChurchillChurchill, Winston
Conservative Prime Ministers — notably Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher — led governments for 57 years of the twentieth century.
Ideologically an economic liberal and imperialist, for most of his career he was a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but from 1904 to 1924 was a member of the Liberal Party.

Political party

political partiespartyparties
Conservative Party, officially the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a centre-right political party in the United Kingdom.
The transformation from loose factions into organised modern political parties is considered to have first occurred in either the United Kingdom or the United States, with the United Kingdom's Conservative Party and the Democratic Party of the United States both frequently called the world's first modern political party.

Labour Party (UK)

Labour PartyLabourBritish Labour Party
In the 1920s, the Labour Party surpassed the Liberals as the Conservatives' main rivals. However, the party lost the 1945 general election in a landslide to the resurgent Labour Party, who won their first ever majority government.
It overtook the Liberal Party to become the main opposition to the Conservative Party in the early 1920s, forming two minority governments under Ramsay MacDonald in the 1920s and early 1930s.

Political make-up of local councils in the United Kingdom

ExecutivePolitical make-up of local councils in Northern IrelandPolitical make-up of London borough councils
It also has 234 members of the House of Lords, 4 members of the European Parliament, 31 Members of the Scottish Parliament, 11 members of the Welsh Assembly, 8 members of the London Assembly and 7,445 local councillors.

Liberal Unionist Party

Liberal UnionistLiberal UnionistsUnionist
In 1912, the Liberal Unionist Party merged with the party to form the Conservative and Unionist Party. In 1886, the party formed an alliance with Spencer Compton Cavendish, Lord Hartington (later the 8th Duke of Devonshire) and Joseph Chamberlain's new Liberal Unionist Party and, under the statesmen Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, Lord Salisbury and Arthur Balfour, held power for all but three of the following twenty years before suffering a heavy defeat in 1906 when it split over the issue of free trade.
Led by Lord Hartington (later the Duke of Devonshire) and Joseph Chamberlain, the party formed a political alliance with the Conservative Party in opposition to Irish Home Rule.

Conservatism

conservativeconservativesReligious conservatism
Positioned on the centre-right to right of British politics, the Conservative Party is ideologically conservative.
According to Quintin Hogg, the chairman of the British Conservative Party in 1959: "Conservatism is not so much a philosophy as an attitude, a constant force, performing a timeless function in the development of a free society, and corresponding to a deep and permanent requirement of human nature itself."

Tories (British political party)

ToryToriesTory Party
The Conservative Party was founded in 1834 from the Tory Party—the Conservatives' colloquial name is "Tories"—and was one of two dominant political parties in the nineteenth century, along with the Liberal Party.
One faction, led by Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby and Benjamin Disraeli, survived to become the modern Conservative Party, whose members are commonly still referred to as Tories as they still often follow and promote the ideology of Toryism.

Robert Peel

Sir Robert PeelPeelSir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet
The name immediately caught on and was officially adopted under the aegis of Sir Robert Peel around 1834.
Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet, (5 February 1788 – 2 July 1850) was a British Conservative statesman who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1834–35 and 1841–46) and twice as Home Secretary (1822–27 and 1828–30).

European Conservatives and Reformists

ECREuropean Conservatives and Reformists GroupERC
The Conservatives are a member of the International Democrat Union and the Alliance of Conservatives and Reformists in Europe, and sit with the European Conservatives and Reformists (ECR) parliamentary group.
The ECR was founded around the Movement for European Reform after the 2009 European elections at the behest of British Conservative Party leader David Cameron.

Gibraltar Conservatives

local branchGibraltarian
The Scottish, Welsh, Northern Irish and Gibraltarian branches of the party are semi-autonomous.
The Conservative Party in Gibraltar is the part of the Conservative Party that operates in the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar.

Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby

Lord DerbyEarl of DerbyLord Stanley
The widening of the electoral franchise in the nineteenth century forced the Conservative Party to popularise its approach under Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby and Benjamin Disraeli, who carried through their own expansion of the franchise with the Reform Act of 1867.
Edward George Geoffrey Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, (29 March 1799 – 23 October 1869) was a British statesman, three-time Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and, to date, the longest-serving leader of the Conservative Party.

Reform Act 1867

Second Reform ActRepresentation of the People Act 1867Reform Act of 1867
The widening of the electoral franchise in the nineteenth century forced the Conservative Party to popularise its approach under Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby and Benjamin Disraeli, who carried through their own expansion of the franchise with the Reform Act of 1867.
The overall intent was to help the Conservative Party, yet it resulted in their loss of the 1868 general election.

Arthur Balfour

BalfourLord BalfourA.J. Balfour
In 1886, the party formed an alliance with Spencer Compton Cavendish, Lord Hartington (later the 8th Duke of Devonshire) and Joseph Chamberlain's new Liberal Unionist Party and, under the statesmen Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, Lord Salisbury and Arthur Balfour, held power for all but three of the following twenty years before suffering a heavy defeat in 1906 when it split over the issue of free trade.
Arthur James Balfour, 1st Earl of Balfour, (, traditionally Scottish ; 25 July 1848 – 19 March 1930) was a British Conservative statesman who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1902 to 1905.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
Conservative Party, officially the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a centre-right political party in the United Kingdom.
To seek new markets and sources of raw materials, the Conservative Party under Disraeli launched a period of imperialist expansion in Egypt, South Africa, and elsewhere.

Joseph Chamberlain

ChamberlainJ Chamberlain The Right Honourable '''Joseph Chamberlain
In 1886, the party formed an alliance with Spencer Compton Cavendish, Lord Hartington (later the 8th Duke of Devonshire) and Joseph Chamberlain's new Liberal Unionist Party and, under the statesmen Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, Lord Salisbury and Arthur Balfour, held power for all but three of the following twenty years before suffering a heavy defeat in 1906 when it split over the issue of free trade.
Joseph Chamberlain (8 July 1836 – 2 July 1914) was a British statesman who was first a radical Liberal, then, after opposing home rule for Ireland, a Liberal Unionist, and eventually served as a leading imperialist in coalition with the Conservatives.

Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury

Lord SalisburyThe Marquess of SalisburyMarquess of Salisbury
In 1886, the party formed an alliance with Spencer Compton Cavendish, Lord Hartington (later the 8th Duke of Devonshire) and Joseph Chamberlain's new Liberal Unionist Party and, under the statesmen Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, Lord Salisbury and Arthur Balfour, held power for all but three of the following twenty years before suffering a heavy defeat in 1906 when it split over the issue of free trade.
A member of the Conservative Party, he was the last Prime Minister to head his full administration from the House of Lords.

Spencer Cavendish, 8th Duke of Devonshire

Lord HartingtonMarquess of HartingtonDuke of Devonshire
In 1886, the party formed an alliance with Spencer Compton Cavendish, Lord Hartington (later the 8th Duke of Devonshire) and Joseph Chamberlain's new Liberal Unionist Party and, under the statesmen Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, Lord Salisbury and Arthur Balfour, held power for all but three of the following twenty years before suffering a heavy defeat in 1906 when it split over the issue of free trade.
He has the distinction of having served as leader of three political parties: as Leader of the Liberal Party in the House of Commons (1875–1880) and as of the Liberal Unionist Party (1886–1903) and of the Unionists in the House of Lords (1902–1903) (though the Conservatives and Liberal Unionists operated in close alliance from 1892–1903 and would eventually merge in 1912).

Bonar Law

Andrew Bonar LawLaw The Right Honourable '''Bonar Law
Under Bonar Law's leadership in 1911–14, the Party morale improved, the "radical right" wing was contained, and the party machinery strengthened. In 1922, Bonar Law and Stanley Baldwin led the break-up of the coalition and the Conservatives governed until 1923, when a minority Labour government led by Ramsay MacDonald came to power.
Andrew Bonar Law (16 September 1858 – 30 October 1923) was a British Conservative politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1922 to 1923.

Stanley Baldwin

BaldwinStanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of BewdleySir Stanley Baldwin
In 1922, Bonar Law and Stanley Baldwin led the break-up of the coalition and the Conservatives governed until 1923, when a minority Labour government led by Ramsay MacDonald came to power.
Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, (3 August 1867 – 14 December 1947) was a British Conservative statesman who dominated the government of the United Kingdom between the world wars, serving as Prime Minister on three occasions.

1918 United Kingdom general election

1918 general election19181918 election
In late 1916 Liberal David Lloyd George became prime minister but the Liberals soon split and the Conservatives dominated the government, especially after their landslide in the 1918 election.
The result was a massive landslide in favour of the coalition, comprising primarily the Conservatives and Coalition Liberals, with massive losses for Liberals who were not endorsed.

Tory

ToriesToryismConservative
The Conservative Party was founded in 1834 from the Tory Party—the Conservatives' colloquial name is "Tories"—and was one of two dominant political parties in the nineteenth century, along with the Liberal Party.
The British Conservative Party and Conservative Party of Canada, and their members, continue to be referred to as Tories.

1945 United Kingdom general election

1945 general election19451945 election
However, the party lost the 1945 general election in a landslide to the resurgent Labour Party, who won their first ever majority government.
Since 1940, the United Kingdom had been governed by a wartime coalition of all major parties led by Winston Churchill and his Conservatives.

Henry Campbell-Bannerman

Sir Henry Campbell-BannermanCampbell-BannermanHenry Campbell Bannerman
He was replaced by Liberal Prime Minister Henry Campbell-Bannerman who called an election in January 1906, which produced a massive Liberal victory with a gain of 214 seats.
Following a general election defeat in 1900, Campbell-Bannerman went on to lead the Liberal Party to a landslide victory over the Conservative Party at the 1906 general election, also the last election in which the Liberals gained an overall majority in the House of Commons.

David Lloyd George

Lloyd GeorgeRt Hon David Lloyd GeorgeDavid Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor
In late 1916 Liberal David Lloyd George became prime minister but the Liberals soon split and the Conservatives dominated the government, especially after their landslide in the 1918 election.
To fund the government's extensive welfare reforms, he proposed taxes on land ownership and high incomes in a "People's Budget" (1909), which the Conservative-dominated House of Lords rejected.