Constable of the Tower

Constable of the Tower of LondonConstableLieutenant of the TowerLieutenant of the Tower of LondonConstable's Dues ritualGovernor of the Tower of LondonLieutenantTower Hamlets
The Constable of the Tower is the most senior appointment at the Tower of London.wikipedia
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Lieutenant of the Tower of London

Lieutenant of the TowerLieutenant
The Constable's ceremonial deputy is the Lieutenant of the Tower of London, currently Simon Mayall;
The Lieutenant of the Tower of London serves directly under the Constable of the Tower.

Tower of London

Towerthe TowerThe Tower of London
The Constable of the Tower is the most senior appointment at the Tower of London. This was an unusual arrangement as Lord Lieutenancy powers were usually exercised at county level; they enabled the Constable to raise local forces to supplement the Tower garrison at times of increased tension, or for use in the field.
In the absence of the monarch, the Constable of the Tower is in charge of the castle.

Constable

police constableconstablesPC
In the Middle Ages a constable was the person in charge of a castle when the owner—the king or a nobleman—was not in residence.
Even today, there is a Constable of the Tower of London.

Geoffrey de Mandeville (11th century)

Geoffrey de MandevilleGeoffrey de Mandeville Ide Mandevilles
The first Constable, Geoffrey de Mandeville was appointed by William the Conqueror (AD 1066-87) in the 11th century.
Geoffrey de Mandeville (died c. 1100), also known as de Magnaville (from the Latin de Magna Villa "of the great town"), was a Constable of the Tower of London.

Tower division

Tower HamletsTowerTower Division (aka Tower Hamlets)
The Tower Hamlets was an area of SE Middlesex that urbanised as inner East London and included the area of the eponymous modern borough and most of what is now the London Borough of Hackney.
It was also known as the Tower Hamlets, and took its name from the military obligations owed to the Constable of the Tower of London.

Lord Lieutenant of the Tower Hamlets

Until 1899, the Constable also held the office of Lord Lieutenant of the Tower Hamlets.
It was generally held by the Constable of the Tower of London.

Resident Governor of the Tower of London and Keeper of the Jewel House

Keeper of the Jewel HouseResident GovernorResident Governor and Major of HM Tower of London
He in turn entrusts it to the Resident Governor, who is responsible for the day-to-day running of Her Majesty’s Palace and Fortress, the Tower of London.
The Constable of the Tower is the most senior appointment at the Tower of London.

Lord-lieutenant

lieutenancylord lieutenantLords Lieutenant
This was an unusual arrangement as Lord Lieutenancy powers were usually exercised at county level; they enabled the Constable to raise local forces to supplement the Tower garrison at times of increased tension, or for use in the field.
The Constable of the Tower of London and the Warden of the Cinque Ports were ex-officio lieutenants for the Tower Hamlets and Cinque Ports respectively, which were treated as counties in legislation regarding lieutenancy and militia affairs.

William de Mandeville

William
William de Mandeville (died before 1130) was an Anglo-Norman baron and Constable of the Tower of London.

Stephen de Segrave

Stephen de SeagraveStephen de SegneStephen, Lord de Segrave
Stephen became a knight and was made constable of the Tower of London in 1220.

Bertram de Criol

Bertram of CryallBertram de Crioll (younger)Bertram de Crioyl
He served as Constable and Keeper of Dover Castle, Keeper of the Coast and of the Cinque Ports, Keeper of the receipts, expenses and wardships of the archbishopric of Canterbury, Constable of the Tower of London and Sheriff of Kent.

Yeomen Warders

beefeaterBeefeatersYeoman Warder
Yeomen Warders were no longer permitted to buy and sell their places but were to be drawn only from sergeants in the Army.
The Yeomen Warders provided the permanent garrison of the Tower, but the Constable of the Tower could call upon the men of the Tower Hamlets to supplement them when necessary.

Thomas d'Ippegrave

He was a member of the Privy Council of Ireland in 1264, served as Constable of the Tower and Lord Mayor of London in 1268 and then served as Seneschal of Gascony from 1268 until 1269.

Nicholas de la Beche

Beche was appointed Constable of the Tower of London in October 1335 and was appointed as Governor to Edward of Woodstock, heir to King Edward III of England in 1336.

Thomas Rempston

Sir Thomas Rempstonhis fatherSir Thomas de Rempston
Sir Thomas Rempston (or Ramston) KG (died 1406),was Constable of the Tower and an MP.

Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

Duke of WellingtonWellingtonArthur Wellesley
Perhaps the most famous Constable was Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, who served from 1825 to 1852.
He was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the British Army on 22 January 1827 and Constable of the Tower of London on 5 February 1827.

Antony Bek (bishop of Durham)

Antony BekAnthony BekAntony Bek, Bishop of Durham
Edward named Bek the constable of the Tower of London in 1275.

William Kingston

Sir William Kingston
He was the Constable of the Tower of London during much of the reign of Henry VIII.

Nick Houghton

Sir Nick HoughtonThe Lord Houghton of RichmondJohn Nicholas Reynolds Houghton
The Constable appointed in 2016 is General Sir Nick Houghton.

Robert Oxenbridge (died 1574)

Sir Robert OxenbridgeRobertRobert Oxenbridge
Sir Robert Oxenbridge (1508–1574) was an English Member of Parliament and Constable of the Tower.

Edward of Norwich, 2nd Duke of York

Edward of NorwichEdwardDuke of York
In the late 1390s, Edward was sent on embassies to France and to the Count Palatine and was appointed to numerous offices, including Constable of Dover Castle, Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports, Keeper of the Channel Islands, Constable of the Tower, Warden of the New Forest, Keeper of Carisbrooke Castle and Lord of the Isle of Wight.

John Gage (Tudor politician)

Sir John GageJohn GageSir John Gage KG
He held a number of offices, including Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (1542–1547), Comptroller of the Household (1540–1547), Constable of the Tower (1540–1556) and Lord Chamberlain (1553–1556).

Henry Holland, 3rd Duke of Exeter

Duke of ExeterHenry Holland, Duke of ExeterExeter
Exeter was for a time Constable of the Tower of London, and afterwards the rack there came to be called "the Duke of Exeter's daughter".

John Holland, 2nd Duke of Exeter

John Holland, Earl of HuntingdonEarl of HuntingdonJohn Holland, 2nd Earl of Huntingdon
Over the next five years he held various important commands with the English forces in France and in 1420 was made Constable of the Tower of London.

Robert Lucas, 3rd Baron Lucas

Lord Lucas
A supporter of William III during the Glorious Revolution, he was made Constable of the Tower of London by the House of Lords to supersede Lord Dartmouth, an appointment subsequently confirmed by the King.