Constitution of New Zealand

constitutionalNew ZealandconstitutionNew Zealand's constitutionNew Zealand's uncodified constitutionits constitutionNew Zealand constitutionconstitutional lawconstitutional principlesConstitutional Review
The Constitution of New Zealand is the sum of laws and principles that determine the political governance of New Zealand.wikipedia
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Letters Patent Constituting the Office of Governor-General of New Zealand

Letters Patent 1983Letters Patentletters patent constituting the office of governor-general
The Constitution Act 1986 has a central role, alongside a collection of other statutes, Orders in Council, letters patent, decisions of the courts, principles of the Treaty of Waitangi, and unwritten traditions and conventions.
The Letters Patent Constituting the Office of Governor-General of New Zealand is a royal decree and a part of the uncodified New Zealand constitution.

Constitution Act 1986

Constitution Act1986New Zealand Constitution Act 1986
The Constitution Act 1986 has a central role, alongside a collection of other statutes, Orders in Council, letters patent, decisions of the courts, principles of the Treaty of Waitangi, and unwritten traditions and conventions.
The Constitution Act 1986 is an Act of the New Zealand Parliament that forms a major part of the Constitution of New Zealand.

Monarchy of New Zealand

Queen of New ZealandMonarchKing of the British Dominions Beyond the Seas
The monarch of New Zealand is the head of state, represented in the Realm of New Zealand by the governor-general, and is the source of executive, judicial and legislative power, although effective power is in the hands of ministers drawn from the democratically elected New Zealand House of Representatives.
However, the Queen is the only member of the royal family with any constitutional role.

New Zealand

NZLNZKiwi
The Constitution of New Zealand is the sum of laws and principles that determine the political governance of New Zealand.
New Zealand is a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary democracy, although its constitution is not codified.

Imperial Laws Application Act 1988

Imperial Laws Application Act
Under the Imperial Laws Application Act 1988, however, the Act of Settlement is deemed a New Zealand Act, which may be amended only by the New Zealand Parliament.
The Imperial Laws Application Act 1988 is an important part of New Zealand's uncodified constitution.

New Zealand Constitution Act 1852

Constitution ActNew Zealand Constitution ActNew Zealand Constitution Act of 1852
Following the suspension of the 1846 Act, the Imperial Parliament moved again to grant New Zealand self-government with the New Zealand Constitution Act 1852, which repealed the earlier Constitution Act.
The Act remained in force as part of New Zealand's constitution until it was repealed by the Constitution Act 1986.

New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990

New Zealand Bill of Rights ActBill of Rights ActNew Zealand Bill of Rights
The New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 sets out the civil and political rights of New Zealand citizens against the three branches of government and entities and persons exercising public functions.
It is part of New Zealand's uncodified constitution.

Uncodified constitution

uncodifiedunwritten constitutionunwritten
It is an uncodified constitution, consisting of both written and unwritten sources.

Law of New Zealand

New Zealand lawNew ZealandLaw in New Zealand
The Constitution of New Zealand is the sum of laws and principles that determine the political governance of New Zealand.

Cabinet Manual (New Zealand)

Cabinet ManualNew Zealand Cabinet Manual
The Cabinet Manual forms one part of the constitution of New Zealand, and serves to consolidate many of the previously unwritten conventions through which the New Zealand Government operates.

Judiciary of New Zealand

New Zealand judiciarycourtsjudges
The Constitution Act 1986 has a central role, alongside a collection of other statutes, Orders in Council, letters patent, decisions of the courts, principles of the Treaty of Waitangi, and unwritten traditions and conventions. New Zealand's judiciary is a hierarchy consisting of the Supreme Court of New Zealand, the Court of Appeal of New Zealand, the High Court of New Zealand, and the District Courts.

Referendums in New Zealand

referendumCitizens Initiated Referendumcitizens initiated referendums
There are some exceptions to this though – the Electoral Act 1993 requires certain provisions can only be amended following a referendum.

New Zealand Constitution Act 1846

New Zealand Constitution Act1846 Actconstitution
The Imperial Parliament (Westminster) passed the first New Zealand Constitution Act 1846 empowering the government in New Zealand in 1846.
The Act formally remained part of New Zealand's constitution until it was repealed by the New Zealand Constitution Act 1852.

Executive Council of New Zealand

Executive CouncilMember of Executive CouncilExecutive Council in New Zealand
The Cabinet forms the practical expression of a formal body known as the Executive Council.

Republicanism in New Zealand

New Zealand republicrepublicanismconstitutionally remove British sovereignty
Many groups advocate constitutional reform by referendum, for example New Zealand Republic supports a referendum on a republic.
Because New Zealand's constitution is uncodified, a republic could be enacted by statute, as a simple act of parliament.

Supreme Court of New Zealand

Supreme CourtNew Zealand Supreme CourtHigh Court
New Zealand's judiciary is a hierarchy consisting of the Supreme Court of New Zealand, the Court of Appeal of New Zealand, the High Court of New Zealand, and the District Courts. The Privy Council as New Zealand's highest court of appeal was replaced by the Supreme Court of New Zealand by a simple Act of Parliament despite calls from New Zealand First, National and ACT for a referendum to be called on the issue.

Treaty of Waitangi

Te Tiriti o WaitangiTreatyThe Treaty of Waitangi
It increasingly reflects the fact that the Treaty of Waitangi is regarded as a founding document of government in New Zealand.

Statute of Westminster Adoption Act 1947

Statute of Westminster Adoption Act1947adopt the statute until 1947
"The Crown in right of New Zealand" has been legally distinct from the British monarchy following New Zealand's adoption of the Statute of Westminster 1931 in 1947.

Independence of New Zealand

independenceNew Zealand independencean independent country of its own
New Zealand has no fixed date of independence; instead, political independence came about as a result of New Zealand's evolving constitutional status.

New Zealand First

NZ FirstNew Zealand First Party NZ First
The Privy Council as New Zealand's highest court of appeal was replaced by the Supreme Court of New Zealand by a simple Act of Parliament despite calls from New Zealand First, National and ACT for a referendum to be called on the issue.
The party refers to the Treaty as a "source of national pride" but does not support it becoming a part of constitutional law.

New Zealand Parliament

ParliamentParliament of New ZealandHouse of Representatives
In most cases the New Zealand Parliament can perform "constitutional reform" simply by passing Acts of Parliament, and thus has the power to change or abolish elements of the constitution.

Entrenched clause

entrenchedeternity clauseentrenched clauses
Certain aspects of the constitution are entrenched, after a fashion.
Section 268 of the Electoral Act (part of the Constitution of New Zealand) declares that the law governing the maximum term of Parliament, along with certain provisions of the Electoral Act relating to the redistribution of electoral boundaries, the voting age, and the secret ballot, may only be altered either by three-quarters of the entire membership of the House of Representatives, or by a majority of valid votes in a popular referendum.

New Zealand Constitution Amendment (Request and Consent) Act 1947

New Zealand Constitution Amendment Act 1947Full power to amend own constitutionNew Zealand Constitution (Amendment) Act 1947
At the request of the New Zealand Parliament, Westminster passed the New Zealand Constitution (Amendment) Act 1947 to grant the New Zealand Parliament full sovereign powers to amend or repeal the New Zealand Constitution Act 1852.

Electoral reform in New Zealand

electoral reform1993 electoral referendumNew Zealand
The Fourth Labour government also began the process of electoral reform.

New Zealand Legislative Council

Legislative CouncilMLCLegislative Council Chamber
Because it is not supreme law, New Zealand's constitution is in theory comparatively easy to reform, requiring only a majority of Members of Parliament to amend it, as illustrated by the abolition of the Legislative Council in 1950.