Constitution of the United States

United States ConstitutionU.S. ConstitutionConstitutionUS ConstitutionconstitutionalConstitution of the United States of AmericaU.S. Const.Federal ConstitutionAmerican Constitutionconstitutionality
The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America.wikipedia
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Supremacy Clause

supreme law of the landU.S. Const. Art. VIsupreme law
The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America.
The Supremacy Clause of the Constitution of the United States (Article VI, Clause 2), establishes that the Constitution, federal laws made pursuant to it, and treaties made under its authority, constitute the “supreme Law of the Land”, and thus take priority over any conflicting state laws.

Article Three of the United States Constitution

Article IIIU.S. Const. art. IIIArticle III of the United States Constitution
Its first three articles embody the doctrine of the separation of powers, whereby the federal government is divided into three branches: the legislative, consisting of the bicameral Congress (Article One); the executive, consisting of the president (Article Two); and the judicial, consisting of the Supreme Court and other federal courts (Article Three).
Article Three of the United States Constitution establishes the judicial branch of the federal government.

Article Four of the United States Constitution

Article IVTerritorial ClauseGuarantee Clause
Articles Four, Five and Six embody concepts of federalism, describing the rights and responsibilities of state governments, the states in relationship to the federal government, and the shared process of constitutional amendment.
Article Four of the United States Constitution outlines the relationship between the various states, as well as the relationship between each state and the United States federal government.

Federal judiciary of the United States

federal courtfederal courtsUnited States federal court
Its first three articles embody the doctrine of the separation of powers, whereby the federal government is divided into three branches: the legislative, consisting of the bicameral Congress (Article One); the executive, consisting of the president (Article Two); and the judicial, consisting of the Supreme Court and other federal courts (Article Three).
The federal judiciary of the United States is one of the three branches of the federal government of the United States organized under the United States Constitution and laws of the federal government.

Article Five of the United States Constitution

Article VArticle Fiveratified
Articles Four, Five and Six embody concepts of federalism, describing the rights and responsibilities of state governments, the states in relationship to the federal government, and the shared process of constitutional amendment.
Article Five of the United States Constitution describes the process whereby the Constitution, the nation's frame of government, may be altered.

Federalism

federalfederalistfederal system
Articles Four, Five and Six embody concepts of federalism, describing the rights and responsibilities of state governments, the states in relationship to the federal government, and the shared process of constitutional amendment.
Its distinctive feature, exemplified in the founding example of modern federalism by the United States under the Constitution of 1787, is a relationship of parity between the two levels of government established.

Federal government of the United States

United States governmentU.S. governmentfederal government
Its first three articles embody the doctrine of the separation of powers, whereby the federal government is divided into three branches: the legislative, consisting of the bicameral Congress (Article One); the executive, consisting of the president (Article Two); and the judicial, consisting of the Supreme Court and other federal courts (Article Three).
The federal government is composed of three distinct branches: legislative, executive and judicial, whose powers are vested by the U.S. Constitution in the Congress, the president and the federal courts, respectively.

United States Bill of Rights

Bill of RightsU.S. Bill of RightsUS Bill of Rights
In general, the first ten amendments, known collectively as the Bill of Rights, offer specific protections of individual liberty and justice and place restrictions on the powers of government.
The United States Bill of Rights comprises the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution.

Article Six of the United States Constitution

Article VIArticle SixU.S. Const. art. VI
Articles Four, Five and Six embody concepts of federalism, describing the rights and responsibilities of state governments, the states in relationship to the federal government, and the shared process of constitutional amendment.
Article Six of the United States Constitution establishes the laws and treaties of the United States made in accordance with it as the supreme law of the land, forbids a religious test as a requirement for holding a governmental position, and holds the United States under the Constitution responsible for debts incurred by the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
Its first three articles embody the doctrine of the separation of powers, whereby the federal government is divided into three branches: the legislative, consisting of the bicameral Congress (Article One); the executive, consisting of the president (Article Two); and the judicial, consisting of the Supreme Court and other federal courts (Article Three).
The Congress was created by the Constitution of the United States and first met in 1789, replacing in its legislative function the Congress of the Confederation.

Article Seven of the United States Constitution

Article SevenArticle VIIMassachusetts' ratification
Article Seven establishes the procedure subsequently used by the thirteen States to ratify it.
Article Seven of the United States Constitution sets the number of state ratifications necessary in order for the Constitution to take effect and prescribes the method through which the states may ratify it.

United States constitutional law

constitutional lawU.S. constitutional lawAmerican constitutional law
The first permanent constitution of its kind, adopted by the people's representatives for an expansive nation, it is interpreted, supplemented, and implemented by a large body of constitutional law, and has influenced the constitutions of other nations.
United States constitutional law is the body of law governing the interpretation and implementation of the United States Constitution.

State governments of the United States

state governmentsU.S. state governmentstate
Articles Four, Five and Six embody concepts of federalism, describing the rights and responsibilities of state governments, the states in relationship to the federal government, and the shared process of constitutional amendment.
The United States comprises 50 states: 13 that were already part of the United States at the time the present Constitution took effect in 1789, plus 37 that have been admitted since by Congress as authorized under Article IV, Section 3 of the Constitution.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
Although, in a way, the Congressional powers in Article 9 made the "league of states as cohesive and strong as any similar sort of republican confederation in history", the chief problem was, in the words of George Washington, "no money". The vision of a "respectable nation" among nations seemed to be fading in the eyes of revolutionaries such as George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and Rufus King.
He presided at the Constitutional Convention of 1787 which established the U.S. Constitution

List of amendments to the United States Constitution

amendmentamendmentsconstitutional amendment
Since the Constitution came into force in 1789, it has been amended 27 times, including one amendment that repealed a previous one, in order to meet the needs of a nation that has profoundly changed since the eighteenth century.
Thirty-three amendments to the United States Constitution have been proposed by the United States Congress and sent to the states for ratification since the Constitution was put into operation on March 4, 1789.

Continental Congress

CongressContinental CongressmanDelegate to the Continental Congress
From September 5, 1774, to March 1, 1781, the Continental Congress functioned as the provisional government of the United States.
More broadly, it also refers to the Congress of the Confederation of 1781–1789, thus covering the three congressional bodies of the Thirteen Colonies and the United States that met between 1774 and the inauguration of a new government in 1789 under the United States Constitution.

James Madison

MadisonPresident MadisonPresident James Madison
In September 1786, during an inter–state convention to discuss and develop a consensus about reversing the protectionist trade barriers that each state had erected, James Madison angrily questioned whether the Articles of Confederation was a binding compact or even a viable government.
He is hailed as the "Father of the Constitution" for his pivotal role in drafting and promoting the Constitution of the United States and the United States Bill of Rights.

U.S. state

StatestatesU. S. state
Articles Four, Five and Six embody concepts of federalism, describing the rights and responsibilities of state governments, the states in relationship to the federal government, and the shared process of constitutional amendment. Article Seven establishes the procedure subsequently used by the thirteen States to ratify it.
States, unlike U.S. territories, possess a number of powers and rights under the United States Constitution.

Articles of Confederation

Articles of Confederation and Perpetual UnionConfederationArticles
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was the first constitution of the United States.
On March 4, 1789, the government under the Articles was replaced with the federal government under the Constitution.

Separation of powers

checks and balancesbranches of governmentdivision of powers
Its first three articles embody the doctrine of the separation of powers, whereby the federal government is divided into three branches: the legislative, consisting of the bicameral Congress (Article One); the executive, consisting of the president (Article Two); and the judicial, consisting of the Supreme Court and other federal courts (Article Three).
The origin of checks and balances, like separation of powers itself, is specifically credited to Montesquieu in the Enlightenment (in The Spirit of the Laws, 1748), under this influence was implemented in 1787 in the Constitution of the United States.

Rufus King

KingKing, RufusRufus King of New York
The vision of a "respectable nation" among nations seemed to be fading in the eyes of revolutionaries such as George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and Rufus King. Toward the close of these discussions, on September 8, a "Committee of Style and Arrangement" – Alexander Hamilton (New York), William Samuel Johnson (Connecticut), Rufus King (Massachusetts), James Madison (Virginia), and Gouverneur Morris (Pennsylvania) – was appointed to distill a final draft constitution from the twenty-three approved articles.
He was a delegate for Massachusetts to the Continental Congress and the Philadelphia Convention and was one of the signers of the United States Constitution in 1787.

Oliver Ellsworth

EllsworthEllsworth, OliverJemima (Leavitt) Ellsworth
On July 24, a "Committee of Detail" – John Rutledge (South Carolina), Edmund Randolph (Virginia), Nathaniel Gorham (Massachusetts), Oliver Ellsworth (Connecticut), and James Wilson (Pennsylvania) – was elected to draft a detailed constitution reflective of the Resolutions passed by the convention up to that point.
He was a framer of the United States Constitution, a United States Senator from Connecticut, and the third Chief Justice of the United States.

Alexander Hamilton

HamiltonHamiltonianA. Hamilton
Toward the close of these discussions, on September 8, a "Committee of Style and Arrangement" – Alexander Hamilton (New York), William Samuel Johnson (Connecticut), Rufus King (Massachusetts), James Madison (Virginia), and Gouverneur Morris (Pennsylvania) – was appointed to distill a final draft constitution from the twenty-three approved articles.
He was an influential interpreter and promoter of the U.S. Constitution, as well as the founder of the nation's financial system, the Federalist Party, the United States Coast Guard, and the New York Post newspaper.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
Its first three articles embody the doctrine of the separation of powers, whereby the federal government is divided into three branches: the legislative, consisting of the bicameral Congress (Article One); the executive, consisting of the president (Article Two); and the judicial, consisting of the Supreme Court and other federal courts (Article Three).
It was through the closed-door negotiations at Philadelphia that the presidency framed in the U.S. Constitution emerged.

United States Senate

U.S. SenatorUnited States SenatorU.S. Senate
According to the United States Senate: "The Constitution's first three words—We the People—affirm that the government of the United States exists to serve its citizens. For over two centuries the Constitution has remained in force because its framers wisely separated and balanced governmental powers to safeguard the interests of majority rule and minority rights, of liberty and equality, and of the federal and state governments."
The drafters of the Constitution created a bicameral Congress primarily as a compromise between those who felt that each state, since it was sovereign, should be equally represented, and those who felt the legislature must directly represent the people, as the House of Commons did in Great Britain.