Constitution of the United States

Page one of the officially engrossed copy of the Constitution signed by delegates. A print run of 500 copies of the final version preceded this copy.
Signing of the Constitution, September 17, 1787 (1940 by Howard Chandler Christy)
Dates the 13 states ratified the Constitution
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"We the People" in an original edition
Closing endorsement section of the United States Constitution
United States Bill of Rights
Currently housed in the National Archives.
John Jay, 1789–1795
John Marshall, 1801–1835
Salmon P. Chase {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Chase Court, 1864–1873, in 1865 were Salmon P. Chase (chief Justice); Hon. Nathan Clifford, Maine; Stephen J. Field, Justice Supreme Court, U.S.; Hon. Samuel F. Miller, U.S. Supreme Court; Hon. Noah H. Swayne, Justice Supreme Court, U.S.; Judge Morrison R. Waite}}
William Howard Taft {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Taft Court, 1921–1930, in 1925 were James Clark McReynolds, Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., William Howard Taft (chief justice), Willis Van Devanter, Louis Brandeis. Edward Sanford, George Sutherland, Pierce Butler, Harlan Fiske Stone}}
Earl Warren {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Warren Court, 1953–1969, in 1963 were Felix Frankfurter; Hugo Black; Earl Warren (chief justice); Stanley Reed; William O. Douglas. Tom Clark; Robert H. Jackson; Harold Burton; Sherman Minton}}
William Rehnquist {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Rehnquist Court, 1986–2005.}}
José Rizal
Sun Yat-sen

Supreme law of the United States of America.

- Constitution of the United States
Page one of the officially engrossed copy of the Constitution signed by delegates. A print run of 500 copies of the final version preceded this copy.

215 related topics

Alpha

Euler diagram showing A is a subset of B, A⊆B, and conversely B is a superset of A.

Supermajority

Requirement for a proposal to gain a specified level of support which is greater than the threshold of more than one-half used for a simple majority.

Requirement for a proposal to gain a specified level of support which is greater than the threshold of more than one-half used for a simple majority.

Euler diagram showing A is a subset of B, A⊆B, and conversely B is a superset of A.

The Constitution of the United States requires supermajorities in order for certain significant actions to occur.

1st United States Congress

The 1st United States Congress, comprising the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives, met from March 4, 1789, to March 4, 1791, during the first two years of George Washington's presidency, first at Federal Hall in New York City and later at Congress Hall in Philadelphia.

The 1st United States Congress, comprising the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives, met from March 4, 1789, to March 4, 1791, during the first two years of George Washington's presidency, first at Federal Hall in New York City and later at Congress Hall in Philadelphia.

Congress Hall in Philadelphia, meeting place of this Congress's third session.
Statue of George Washington in front of Federal Hall, where he was first inaugurated as president.
Senate President John Adams
Senate President pro tempore John Langdon
Speaker of the House Frederick Muhlenberg of Pennsylvania
Beginning of the Congress
End of the Congress
Beginning of the Congress
End of the Congress

With the initial meeting of the First Congress, the United States federal government officially began operations under the new (and current) frame of government established by the 1787 Constitution.

The Iowa State Capitol building, where the Iowa General Assembly convenes

State legislature (United States)

Legislative body of any of the 50 U.S. states.

Legislative body of any of the 50 U.S. states.

The Iowa State Capitol building, where the Iowa General Assembly convenes

(The ruling does not affect the U.S. Senate, because that chamber's makeup is prescribed by the U.S. Constitution.)

Page one of the officially engrossed copy of the Constitution signed by delegates. A print run of 500 copies of the final version preceded this copy.

Twenty-seventh Amendment to the United States Constitution

Page one of the officially engrossed copy of the Constitution signed by delegates. A print run of 500 copies of the final version preceded this copy.

The Twenty-seventh Amendment (Amendment XXVII) to the United States Constitution prohibits any law that increases or decreases the salary of members of Congress from taking effect until after the next election of the House of Representatives has occurred.

Suffrage universel dédié à Ledru-Rollin, Frédéric Sorrieu, 1850

Suffrage

Right to vote in public, political elections and referendums .

Right to vote in public, political elections and referendums .

Suffrage universel dédié à Ledru-Rollin, Frédéric Sorrieu, 1850
The Peterloo Massacre of 1819
German election poster from 1919: Equal rights – equal duties!
A British postcard against women's suffrage postcard from c.1908. It shows unflattering caricatures of suffragettes in front of parliament and the caption: 'This is the house that man built' with a poem. From the People's History Museum, Manchester.
Women's Suffrage Headquarters on Euclid Avenue in Cleveland, Ohio in 1912
Demonstration for universal right to vote, Prague, Austria-Hungary, 1905
Countries with universal suffrage granted to women, 2017
The Chartists' National Convention at the British Coffee House in February 1839

The Constitution did not originally define who was eligible to vote, allowing each state to decide this status.

Earl Warren

American lawyer, politician, and jurist who served as the 14th Chief Justice of the United States from 1953 to 1969.

American lawyer, politician, and jurist who served as the 14th Chief Justice of the United States from 1953 to 1969.

Warren as a U.S. Army officer in 1918
The René C. Davidson Courthouse, the main courthouse of the Alameda County Superior Court, completed in 1934
California Attorney General
Warren as Governor of California
Governor Warren meets a young "gold miner" as part of the California centennials, 1948–50
Chief Justice Earl Warren
The Warren Court (1953–1969)
President Kennedy, Jacqueline Kennedy, Chief Justice Earl Warren, and Nina Elisabeth Meyers (Warren's wife), November 1963
An "Impeach Earl Warren sign", posted in San Francisco in October 1958
Earl Warren presents the Commission's report to President Johnson on September 24, 1964.
Chief Justice Warren swears in President Nixon on January 20, 1969.
Grave at Arlington National Cemetery
Warren bust, U.S. Supreme Court
Earl Warren Hall, University of California, Berkeley
Earl Warren Building, headquarters of California Supreme Court (San Francisco)

The Warren Court presided over a major shift in American constitutional jurisprudence, which has been recognized by many as a "Constitutional Revolution" in the liberal direction, with Warren writing the majority opinions in landmark cases such as Brown v. Board of Education (1954), Reynolds v. Sims (1964), Miranda v. Arizona (1966) and Loving v. Virginia (1967).

Northwest Territory (1787)

Northwest Ordinance

Organic act of the Congress of the Confederation of the United States.

Organic act of the Congress of the Confederation of the United States.

Northwest Territory (1787)
Map of the states and territories of the United States as it was on August 7, 1789, when the Northwest Territory was organized

The natural rights provisions of the ordinance foreshadowed the Bill of Rights, the first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution.

Justice William O. Douglas, the author of the majority opinion in Griswold

Griswold v. Connecticut

Justice William O. Douglas, the author of the majority opinion in Griswold

Griswold v. Connecticut, 381 U.S. 479 (1965), was a landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in which the Court ruled that the Constitution of the United States protects the liberty of married couples to buy and use contraceptives without government restriction.

James Madison, drafter of the Bill of Rights, by John Vanderlyn

Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution

James Madison, drafter of the Bill of Rights, by John Vanderlyn
The Bill of Rights in the National Archives

The Fifth Amendment (Amendment V) to the United States Constitution addresses criminal procedure and other aspects of the Constitution.

James Wilson (Founding Father)

American statesman, politician, legal scholar, and Founding Father who served as an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1789 to 1798.

American statesman, politician, legal scholar, and Founding Father who served as an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1789 to 1798.

Hannah Gray
"Fort Wilson", the house of James Wilson on the southwest corner of Third and Walnut Streets in Philadelphia

He was elected twice to the Continental Congress, was a signatory of the United States Declaration of Independence, and was a major participant in drafting the United States Constitution.