A report on Constitution of the United States

Page one of the officially engrossed copy of the Constitution signed by delegates. A print run of 500 copies of the final version preceded this copy.
Signing of the Constitution, September 17, 1787 (1940 by Howard Chandler Christy)
Dates the 13 states ratified the Constitution
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"We the People" in an original edition
Closing endorsement section of the United States Constitution
United States Bill of Rights
Currently housed in the National Archives.
John Jay, 1789–1795
John Marshall, 1801–1835
Salmon P. Chase {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Chase Court, 1864–1873, in 1865 were Salmon P. Chase (chief Justice); Hon. Nathan Clifford, Maine; Stephen J. Field, Justice Supreme Court, U.S.; Hon. Samuel F. Miller, U.S. Supreme Court; Hon. Noah H. Swayne, Justice Supreme Court, U.S.; Judge Morrison R. Waite}}
William Howard Taft {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Taft Court, 1921–1930, in 1925 were James Clark McReynolds, Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., William Howard Taft (chief justice), Willis Van Devanter, Louis Brandeis. Edward Sanford, George Sutherland, Pierce Butler, Harlan Fiske Stone}}
Earl Warren {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Warren Court, 1953–1969, in 1963 were Felix Frankfurter; Hugo Black; Earl Warren (chief justice); Stanley Reed; William O. Douglas. Tom Clark; Robert H. Jackson; Harold Burton; Sherman Minton}}
William Rehnquist {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Rehnquist Court, 1986–2005.}}
José Rizal
Sun Yat-sen

Supreme law of the United States of America.

- Constitution of the United States
Page one of the officially engrossed copy of the Constitution signed by delegates. A print run of 500 copies of the final version preceded this copy.

218 related topics with Alpha

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Magna Carta

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Royal charter of rights agreed to by King John of England at Runnymede, near Windsor, on 15 June 1215.

Royal charter of rights agreed to by King John of England at Runnymede, near Windsor, on 15 June 1215.

King John on a stag hunt
A contemporaneous mural of Pope Innocent III
The Articles of the Barons, 1215, held by the British Library
The Charter of the Forest re-issued in 1225, held by the British Library
The 1225 version of Magna Carta issued by Henry III, held in the National Archives
1297 version of the Great Charter, on display in the National Archives Building in Washington, D.C.
Magna carta cum statutis angliae ("Great Charter with English Statutes"), early 14th century
A version of the Charter of 1217, produced between 1437 and c. 1450
The jurist Edward Coke made extensive political use of Magna Carta.
The Leveller John Lilburne criticised Magna Carta as an inadequate definition of English liberties.
Magna Carta replica and display in the rotunda of the United States Capitol, Washington, D.C.
A romanticised 19th-century recreation of King John signing Magna Carta. Rather than signing in writing, the document would have been authenticated with the Great Seal and applied by officials rather than John himself.
The Magna Carta Memorial at Runnymede, designed by Sir Edward Maufe and erected by the American Bar Association in 1957. The memorial stands in the meadow known historically as Long Mede: it is likely that the actual site of the sealing of Magna Carta lay further east, towards Egham and Staines.
1733 engraving by John Pine of the 1215 charter (Cotton Charter XIII.31A)
1225 charter, held in the British Library, with the royal great seal attached
A 1297 copy of Magna Carta, owned by the Australian Government and on display in the Members' Hall of Parliament House, Canberra
A silver King John penny; much of Magna Carta concerned how royal revenues were raised.
King John holding a church, painted c. 1250–1259 by Matthew Paris

It influenced the early American colonists in the Thirteen Colonies and the formation of the United States Constitution, which became the supreme law of the land in the new republic of the United States.

December 23, 1783: General George Washington Resigning His Commission by John Trumbull (1822–1824)

Congress of the Confederation

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The governing body of the United States of America from March 1, 1781, to March 4, 1789.

The governing body of the United States of America from March 1, 1781, to March 4, 1789.

December 23, 1783: General George Washington Resigning His Commission by John Trumbull (1822–1824)

The Congress of the Confederation was succeeded by the Congress of the United States as provided for in the new United States Constitution, proposed September 17, 1787, in Philadelphia and adopted by the United States in 1788.

Dates the 13 states ratified the Constitution

Article Seven of the United States Constitution

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Dates the 13 states ratified the Constitution

Article Seven of the United States Constitution sets the number of state ratifications necessary for the Constitution to take effect and prescribes the method through which the states may ratify it.

Constitutional law of the United States

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The constitutional law of the United States is the body of law governing the interpretation and implementation of the United States Constitution.

The Twelfth Amendment in the National Archives

Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution

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The Twelfth Amendment in the National Archives
Certificate for the electoral vote for Rutherford B. Hayes and William A. Wheeler for the State of Louisiana

The Twelfth Amendment (Amendment XII) to the United States Constitution provides the procedure for electing the president and vice president.

The Capitol exalted classical republican virtues

Republicanism in the United States

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Use of the concept of republic, or the political ideals associated with it in the United States.

Use of the concept of republic, or the political ideals associated with it in the United States.

The Capitol exalted classical republican virtues

The political ideals have been discussed since before the concept of republic was introduced legally by Article Four of the United States Constitution.

The Articles of Confederation, predecessor to the U.S. Constitution and drafted from Anti-Federalist principles

Anti-Federalism

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The Articles of Confederation, predecessor to the U.S. Constitution and drafted from Anti-Federalist principles

Anti-Federalism was a late-18th century political movement that opposed the creation of a stronger U.S. federal government and which later opposed the ratification of the 1787 Constitution.

Article Six of the United States Constitution

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Article Six of the United States Constitution establishes the laws and treaties of the United States made in accordance with it as the supreme law of the land, forbids a religious test as a requirement for holding a governmental position, and holds the United States under the Constitution responsible for debts incurred by the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

The first page of the Judiciary Act of 1789

Judiciary Act of 1789

7 links

The Judiciary Act of 1789 (ch.

The Judiciary Act of 1789 (ch.

The first page of the Judiciary Act of 1789
John Jay Chief Justice Commissioned: Sept. 26, 1789<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.fjc.gov/history/judges/jay-john|title=History of the Federal Judiciary, Judges, Jay, John|website=fjc.gov}}</ref>
John Rutledge Associate Justice Commissioned: Sept. 26, 1789<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.fjc.gov/history/judges/rutledge-john|title=History of the Federal Judiciary, Judges, Rutledge, John|website=fjc.gov}}</ref>
William Cushing Associate Justice Commissioned: Sept. 27, 1789<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.fjc.gov/history/judges/cushing-william|title=History of the Federal Judiciary, Judges, Cushing, William|website=fjc.gov}}</ref>
James Wilson Associate Justice Commissioned: Sept. 29, 1789<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.fjc.gov/history/judges/wilson-james|title=History of the Federal Judiciary, Judges, Wilson, James|website=fjc.gov}}</ref>
John Blair Associate Justice Commissioned: Sept. 30, 1789<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.fjc.gov/history/judges/blair-john-jr|title=History of the Federal Judiciary, Judges, Blair, John, Jr.|website=fjc.gov}}</ref>
James Iredell Associate Justice Commissioned: Feb. 10, 1790<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.fjc.gov/history/judges/iredell-james|title=History of the Federal Judiciary, Judges, Iredell, James|website=fjc.gov}}</ref>

Article III, Section 1 of the Constitution prescribed that the "judicial power of the United States, shall be vested in one Supreme Court, and such inferior Courts" as Congress saw fit to establish.

Portrait by John Wesley Jarvis, between 1809 and 1819

William Samuel Johnson

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American Founding Father and statesman.

American Founding Father and statesman.

Portrait by John Wesley Jarvis, between 1809 and 1819
Coat of Arms of William Samuel Johnson
Portrait by Gilbert Stuart

He was notable for signing the United States Constitution, for representing Connecticut in the United States Senate, and for serving as the third president of King's College, now known as Columbia University.