A report on Constitution of the United States

Page one of the officially engrossed copy of the Constitution signed by delegates. A print run of 500 copies of the final version preceded this copy.
Signing of the Constitution, September 17, 1787 (1940 by Howard Chandler Christy)
Dates the 13 states ratified the Constitution
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"We the People" in an original edition
Closing endorsement section of the United States Constitution
United States Bill of Rights
Currently housed in the National Archives.
John Jay, 1789–1795
John Marshall, 1801–1835
Salmon P. Chase {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Chase Court, 1864–1873, in 1865 were Salmon P. Chase (chief Justice); Hon. Nathan Clifford, Maine; Stephen J. Field, Justice Supreme Court, U.S.; Hon. Samuel F. Miller, U.S. Supreme Court; Hon. Noah H. Swayne, Justice Supreme Court, U.S.; Judge Morrison R. Waite}}
William Howard Taft {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Taft Court, 1921–1930, in 1925 were James Clark McReynolds, Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., William Howard Taft (chief justice), Willis Van Devanter, Louis Brandeis. Edward Sanford, George Sutherland, Pierce Butler, Harlan Fiske Stone}}
Earl Warren {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Warren Court, 1953–1969, in 1963 were Felix Frankfurter; Hugo Black; Earl Warren (chief justice); Stanley Reed; William O. Douglas. Tom Clark; Robert H. Jackson; Harold Burton; Sherman Minton}}
William Rehnquist {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Rehnquist Court, 1986–2005.}}
José Rizal
Sun Yat-sen

Supreme law of the United States of America.

- Constitution of the United States
Page one of the officially engrossed copy of the Constitution signed by delegates. A print run of 500 copies of the final version preceded this copy.

218 related topics with Alpha

Overall

The thirteen colonies (shown in red) in 1775

Colonial government in the Thirteen Colonies

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The governments of the Thirteen Colonies of British America developed in the 17th and 18th centuries under the influence of the British constitution.

The governments of the Thirteen Colonies of British America developed in the 17th and 18th centuries under the influence of the British constitution.

The thirteen colonies (shown in red) in 1775
Governor's Palace at New Bern, North Carolina
Council chamber inside the Capitol building at Colonial Williamsburg

After the Thirteen Colonies had become the United States, the experience under colonial rule would inform and shape the new state constitutions and, ultimately, the United States Constitution.

Portrait by an anonymous artist, 1753–1794

Montesquieu

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French judge, man of letters, historian, and political philosopher.

French judge, man of letters, historian, and political philosopher.

Portrait by an anonymous artist, 1753–1794
Château de la Brède
Montesquieu's 1748 [[:File:Montesquieu, De l'Esprit des loix (1st ed, 1748, vol 1).pdf|De l'Esprit des loix]]
Lettres familières à divers amis d'Italie, 1767

His anonymously published The Spirit of Law (1748), which was received well in both Great Britain and the American colonies, influenced the Founding Fathers of the United States in drafting the U.S. Constitution.

1st United States Congress

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The 1st United States Congress, comprising the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives, met from March 4, 1789, to March 4, 1791, during the first two years of George Washington's presidency, first at Federal Hall in New York City and later at Congress Hall in Philadelphia.

The 1st United States Congress, comprising the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives, met from March 4, 1789, to March 4, 1791, during the first two years of George Washington's presidency, first at Federal Hall in New York City and later at Congress Hall in Philadelphia.

Congress Hall in Philadelphia, meeting place of this Congress's third session.
Statue of George Washington in front of Federal Hall, where he was first inaugurated as president.
Senate President John Adams
Senate President pro tempore John Langdon
Speaker of the House Frederick Muhlenberg of Pennsylvania
Beginning of the Congress
End of the Congress
Beginning of the Congress
End of the Congress
Senators' party membership by state at the opening of the 1st Congress in March 1789.
2 Anti-Administration
1 Anti-Administration and 1 Pro-Administration
2 Pro-Administration

With the initial meeting of the First Congress, the United States federal government officially began operations under the new (and current) frame of government established by the 1787 Constitution.

Recess appointment

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Appointment by the president of a federal official when the U.S. Senate is in recess.

Appointment by the president of a federal official when the U.S. Senate is in recess.

Under the U.S. Constitution's Appointments Clause, the President is empowered to nominate, and with the advice and consent (confirmation) of the Senate, make appointments to high-level policy-making positions in federal departments, agencies, boards, and commissions, as well as to the federal judiciary.

A handwritten bank draft from the Second Bank of the United States, dated July 24, 1824, from Daniel Webster, who argued on behalf of McCulloch and the U.S. government in McCulloch v. Maryland

McCulloch v. Maryland

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Landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision that defined the scope of the U.S. Congress's legislative power and how it relates to the powers of American state legislatures.

Landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision that defined the scope of the U.S. Congress's legislative power and how it relates to the powers of American state legislatures.

A handwritten bank draft from the Second Bank of the United States, dated July 24, 1824, from Daniel Webster, who argued on behalf of McCulloch and the U.S. government in McCulloch v. Maryland
The text of the McCulloch v. Maryland decision, as recorded in the minutes of the Supreme Court

In its ruling, the Supreme Court established firstly that the "Necessary and Proper" Clause of the U.S. Constitution gives the U.S. federal government certain implied powers that are not explicitly enumerated in the Constitution, and secondly that the American federal government is supreme over the states, and so states' ability to interfere with the federal government is restricted.

John Rutledge

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American Founding Father, politician, and jurist who served as one of the original associate justices of the Supreme Court and the second chief justice of the United States.

American Founding Father, politician, and jurist who served as one of the original associate justices of the Supreme Court and the second chief justice of the United States.

Self-Described Coat of Arms of John Rutledge
A map showing the battle lines during the British siege in 1780.
Rutledge's likeness at the National Constitution Center
Bust of John Rutledge in the United States Supreme Court
Gravestone of John Rutledge at St. Michael's Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina

He was a delegate to the 1787 Philadelphia Convention, which wrote the United States Constitution.

James Madison, drafter of the Bill of Rights, by John Vanderlyn

Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution

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James Madison, drafter of the Bill of Rights, by John Vanderlyn
The Bill of Rights in the National Archives

The Fifth Amendment (Amendment V) to the United States Constitution addresses criminal procedure and other aspects of the Constitution.

The order in which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order in which the others were admitted to the union.

Admission to the Union

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The order in which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order in which the others were admitted to the union.
States that were never part of an organized U.S. territory.

Admission to the Union is provided by the Admissions Clause of the United States Constitution in Article IV, Section 3, Clause 1, which authorizes the United States Congress to admit new states into the Union beyond the thirteen states that already existed when the Constitution came into effect.

George Washington's handwritten notes for the first State of the Union Address, January 8, 1790. [[:File:Washington - State of the Union.djvu|Full 7 pages]].

State of the Union

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Annual message delivered by the president of the United States to a joint session of the United States Congress near the beginning of each calendar year on the current condition of the nation.

Annual message delivered by the president of the United States to a joint session of the United States Congress near the beginning of each calendar year on the current condition of the nation.

George Washington's handwritten notes for the first State of the Union Address, January 8, 1790. [[:File:Washington - State of the Union.djvu|Full 7 pages]].
The text of the first page of Ronald Reagan's first State of the Union Address, given January 26, 1982
The Sergeants at Arms of the House (left) and of the Senate (right) wait at the doorway to the House chamber before President Barack Obama enters to deliver the 2011 State of the Union Address.

The address fulfills the requirement in Article II, Section 3, Clause 1 of the U.S. Constitution for the president to periodically "give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient."

On the death of William Henry Harrison, John Tyler (pictured) became the first vice president to succeed to the presidency.

Twenty-fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution

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On the death of William Henry Harrison, John Tyler (pictured) became the first vice president to succeed to the presidency.

The Twenty-fifth Amendment (Amendment XXV) to the United States Constitution deals with presidential succession and disability.