Constitutive rhetoric

Constitutive rhetoric is a theory of discourse devised by James Boyd White about the capacity of language or symbols to create a collective identity for an audience, especially by means of condensation symbols, literature, and narratives.wikipedia
29 Related Articles

James Boyd White

James B. White
Constitutive rhetoric is a theory of discourse devised by James Boyd White about the capacity of language or symbols to create a collective identity for an audience, especially by means of condensation symbols, literature, and narratives.
James Boyd White (born 1938) is an American law professor, literary critic, scholar and philosopher who is generally credited with founding the "Law and Literature" movement and is the preeminent proponent of the analysis of constitutive rhetoric in the analysis of legal texts.

Symbol

symbolssymbologysymbologist
Constitutive rhetoric is a theory of discourse devised by James Boyd White about the capacity of language or symbols to create a collective identity for an audience, especially by means of condensation symbols, literature, and narratives.
In this way, people use symbols not only to make sense of the world around them, but also to identify and cooperate in society through constitutive rhetoric.

Rhetoric

rhetoricianrhetorrhetorical
The constitutive model of rhetoric dates back to the ancient Greek Sophists, with theories that speech moved audiences to action based on a contingent, shared knowledge.
Among the many scholars who have since pursued Burke's line of thought, James Boyd White sees rhetoric as a broader domain of social experience in his notion of constitutive rhetoric.

Edwin Black (rhetorician)

Edwin Black
Edwin Black's theory of the second persona also aided scholars in rhetoric to analyze the imagined shared values and beliefs between speaker and audience through textual analysis.
Black also wrote The Second Persona, which concentrated on a “constitutive" perspective, (Constitutive rhetoric) emphasizing the evaluation of the worldview contained in a text rather than the text's spatio-temporally located effects. The book opened the field to defining concepts of agency and identity. This shift also encouraged critics to bring the study of ideology into rhetorical analysis, as critics could analyze the intended audience (as they were and as the speaker wanted them to be) as the “Second Persona” beyond the speaker's persona. These ideas were later extended into the analysis of “Third Persona” by Philip Wander and “Fourth Persona” by Charles Morris.

Heracles' Bow

*Heracles' Bow
Heracles' Bow is a collection of ten essays, written by James Boyd White in 1985, that examine forensic rhetoric as it creates community, as an example of what White calls constitutive rhetoric.

Discourse

discursivelanguagediscours
Constitutive rhetoric is a theory of discourse devised by James Boyd White about the capacity of language or symbols to create a collective identity for an audience, especially by means of condensation symbols, literature, and narratives.

Language

languageslinguisticlinguistic diversity
Constitutive rhetoric is a theory of discourse devised by James Boyd White about the capacity of language or symbols to create a collective identity for an audience, especially by means of condensation symbols, literature, and narratives.

Identity (philosophy)

identitysamenessnumerical identity
Constitutive rhetoric is a theory of discourse devised by James Boyd White about the capacity of language or symbols to create a collective identity for an audience, especially by means of condensation symbols, literature, and narratives.

Audience

audience participationaudiencesviewers
Constitutive rhetoric is a theory of discourse devised by James Boyd White about the capacity of language or symbols to create a collective identity for an audience, especially by means of condensation symbols, literature, and narratives.

Condensation symbol

condensation symbols
Constitutive rhetoric is a theory of discourse devised by James Boyd White about the capacity of language or symbols to create a collective identity for an audience, especially by means of condensation symbols, literature, and narratives.

Literature

literaryLettersliterary work
Constitutive rhetoric is a theory of discourse devised by James Boyd White about the capacity of language or symbols to create a collective identity for an audience, especially by means of condensation symbols, literature, and narratives.

Sophist

sophistssophistrySophism
The constitutive model of rhetoric dates back to the ancient Greek Sophists, with theories that speech moved audiences to action based on a contingent, shared knowledge.

Kenneth Burke

A Grammar of MotivesBurke, KennethBurkean
Kenneth Burke contributed to the theory of constitutive rhetoric by highlighting identification, rather than persuasion, as the major means by which language functioned.

Content analysis

textual analysistext analysisanalysis
Edwin Black's theory of the second persona also aided scholars in rhetoric to analyze the imagined shared values and beliefs between speaker and audience through textual analysis.

Ethos

characteretheacharacter as a people
Audience must adopt a particular ethos prior to being persuaded by constitutive rhetoric, thus the ethos of the subject of discourse can be critically studied and interpreted through a text.

Culture

culturalculturesculturally
Thus, speech happens within culture, and speakers adapt messages to reflect the ideas and views of a community.

Material culture

materialmaterial culture studiesTangible folk art
When speeches address a diverse crowd as though they are of one community, White describes this as "calling [identity] into being" through material identification.

Identification (psychology)

identificationidentifyimitation
When speeches address a diverse crowd as though they are of one community, White describes this as "calling [identity] into being" through material identification.

Narrative

storystoriesnarratives
Constitutive rhetoric is a theory of discourse devised by James Boyd White about the capacity of language or symbols to create a collective identity for an audience, especially by means of condensation symbols, literature, and narratives. In 1987, Maurice Charland further emphasized the importance of the narrative and Marxist theory He observed, "While classical narratives have an ending, constitutive rhetorics leave the task of narrative closure to their constituted subjects".

Marxist philosophy

Marxist theoryMarxist philosopherMarxist
In 1987, Maurice Charland further emphasized the importance of the narrative and Marxist theory He observed, "While classical narratives have an ending, constitutive rhetorics leave the task of narrative closure to their constituted subjects".

Louis Althusser

AlthusserAlthusser, LouisAlthusserian
Charland's theory draws from Burke and the philosopher Louis Althusser.

Interpellation (philosophy)

interpellationinterpellates
Althusser explained interpellation, or "hailing", as the social phenomenon of a mass audience having already been "recruited" by an ideology.

Ideology

ideologicalideologiespolitical ideology
Althusser explained interpellation, or "hailing", as the social phenomenon of a mass audience having already been "recruited" by an ideology.

Civil rights movement

American Civil Rights Movementcivil rightscivil rights era
An African-American protesting during the Civil Rights Movement established an "African-American" identity.

New Criticism

New CriticsNew CriticalNew Critic
Constitutive rhetoric and theories of logical persuasion (such as New Criticism or Neo-Aristotelianism) can be used together, but constitutive rhetoric presumes that belief and identity always precedes logical persuasion.