Constructed language

constructedconlangconstructed languagesImaginarya prioria priori languageplanned languagea posteriori languageartificial languagesimaginary language
A constructed language (sometimes called a conlang) is a language whose phonology, grammar, and vocabulary are, instead of having developed naturally, consciously devised for communication between intelligent beings, most commonly for use by humanoids.wikipedia
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Fictional language

invented languagefictional languagesfictional
Constructed languages may also be referred to as artificial, planned or invented languages and in some cases fictional languages.
Fictional languages are a subset of constructed languages, and are distinct from the former in that they have been created as part of a fictional setting (i.e. for use in a book, movie, television show, or video game).

Artistic language

personal languageInvented languagealternative language
There are many possible reasons to create a constructed language, such as to ease human communication (see international auxiliary language and code), to give fiction or an associated constructed setting an added layer of realism, for experimentation in the fields of linguistics, cognitive science, and machine learning, for artistic creation, and for language games.
An artistic language, or artlang, is a constructed language designed for aesthetic pleasure.

Esperanto

EsperantistEsperantistsEsperanto language
For example, the Hungarian census of 2001 found 4570 speakers of Esperanto, 10 of Romanid, two each of Interlingua and Ido and one each of Idiom Neutral and Mundolinco. Some speakers of Esperanto and Esperantidos also avoid the term "artificial language" because they deny that there is anything "unnatural" about the use of their language in human communication. Codes for constructed languages include the ISO 639-2 "art" for conlangs; however, some constructed languages have their own ISO 639 language codes (e.g. "eo" and "epo" for Esperanto, "jbo" for Lojban, "ia" and "ina" for Interlingua, "tlh" for Klingon and "io" and "ido" for Ido).
Esperanto is the most widely spoken constructed international auxiliary language.

International auxiliary language

auxiliary languageinternational languageauxiliary languages
There are many possible reasons to create a constructed language, such as to ease human communication (see international auxiliary language and code), to give fiction or an associated constructed setting an added layer of realism, for experimentation in the fields of linguistics, cognitive science, and machine learning, for artistic creation, and for language games.
For this and other reasons, some have turned to the idea of promoting an artificial or constructed language as a possible solution, by way of "auxiliary" language.

Ido language

IdoIdist Ido
For example, the Hungarian census of 2001 found 4570 speakers of Esperanto, 10 of Romanid, two each of Interlingua and Ido and one each of Idiom Neutral and Mundolinco. Codes for constructed languages include the ISO 639-2 "art" for conlangs; however, some constructed languages have their own ISO 639 language codes (e.g. "eo" and "epo" for Esperanto, "jbo" for Lojban, "ia" and "ina" for Interlingua, "tlh" for Klingon and "io" and "ido" for Ido).
Ido is a constructed language, derived from Reformed Esperanto, created to be a universal second language for speakers of diverse backgrounds.

Language

languageslinguisticlinguistic diversity
A constructed language (sometimes called a conlang) is a language whose phonology, grammar, and vocabulary are, instead of having developed naturally, consciously devised for communication between intelligent beings, most commonly for use by humanoids.
The word is sometimes used to refer to codes, ciphers, and other kinds of artificially constructed communication systems such as formally defined computer languages used for computer programming.

Esperantido

reform of Esperantosubsequent reforms
Some speakers of Esperanto and Esperantidos also avoid the term "artificial language" because they deny that there is anything "unnatural" about the use of their language in human communication.
An Esperantido is a constructed language derived from Esperanto.

Natural language

linguisticnaturalnatural languages
A constructed language (sometimes called a conlang) is a language whose phonology, grammar, and vocabulary are, instead of having developed naturally, consciously devised for communication between intelligent beings, most commonly for use by humanoids.
They are distinguished from constructed and formal languages such as those used to program computers or to study logic.

Klingon language

KlingontlhIngan Holklingonaase
A member of the Klingon Language Institute, d'Armond Speers, attempted to raise his son as a native (bilingual with English) Klingon speaker. Codes for constructed languages include the ISO 639-2 "art" for conlangs; however, some constructed languages have their own ISO 639 language codes (e.g. "eo" and "epo" for Esperanto, "jbo" for Lojban, "ia" and "ina" for Interlingua, "tlh" for Klingon and "io" and "ido" for Ido). Among classical "fictional natural languages" are Klingon from the science-fiction franchise Star Trek and the languages created by fantasy writer J. R. R. Tolkien.
The Klingon language (,, in ), sometimes called Klingonese, is the constructed language spoken by the fictional Klingons in the Star Trek universe.

Láadan

ldnwomen's language
Thus, a "better" language should allow the speaker to think more clearly or intelligently or to encompass more points of view; this was the intention of Suzette Haden Elgin in creating Láadan, a feminist language embodied in her feminist science fiction series Native Tongue. Examples include Ithkuil, Kotava, Lojban (and its predecessor Loglan, both of which are also schematic), and even the fictional-setting Láadan.
Láadan is a feminist constructed language created by Suzette Haden Elgin in 1982 to test the Sapir–Whorf hypothesis, specifically to determine if development of a language aimed at expressing the views of women would shape a culture; a subsidiary hypothesis was that Western natural languages may be better suited for expressing the views of men than women.

Mundolinco

For example, the Hungarian census of 2001 found 4570 speakers of Esperanto, 10 of Romanid, two each of Interlingua and Ido and one each of Idiom Neutral and Mundolinco.
Mundolinco is a constructed language created by the Dutch author J. Braakman in 1888.

Toki Pona

Sonja Elen KisaSonja KisaToki Poni
A constructed language could also be used to restrict thought, as in George Orwell's Newspeak, or to simplify thought, as in Toki Pona.
Toki Pona is an oligoisolating constructed language, created by Canadian linguist and translator Sonja Lang as a philosophical language for the purpose of simplifying thoughts and communication.

Suzette Haden Elgin

Suzette ElginElgin, Suzette HadenSuzette Hayden Elgin
Thus, a "better" language should allow the speaker to think more clearly or intelligently or to encompass more points of view; this was the intention of Suzette Haden Elgin in creating Láadan, a feminist language embodied in her feminist science fiction series Native Tongue.
She founded the Science Fiction Poetry Association and is considered an important figure in the field of science fiction constructed languages.

Slovio

The Russian census of 2010 found 992 speakers of Esperanto, nine of Ido, one of Edo and no speakers of Slovio or Interlingua.
Slovio (from the Slavic word "slovo") is a constructed language begun in 1999 by Mark Hučko.

Communication

communicationscommunicatecommunication skills
There are many possible reasons to create a constructed language, such as to ease human communication (see international auxiliary language and code), to give fiction or an associated constructed setting an added layer of realism, for experimentation in the fields of linguistics, cognitive science, and machine learning, for artistic creation, and for language games.
Constructed languages such as Esperanto, programming languages, and various mathematical formalism is not necessarily restricted to the properties shared by human languages.

Lojban

jbo
Codes for constructed languages include the ISO 639-2 "art" for conlangs; however, some constructed languages have their own ISO 639 language codes (e.g. "eo" and "epo" for Esperanto, "jbo" for Lojban, "ia" and "ina" for Interlingua, "tlh" for Klingon and "io" and "ido" for Ido). Examples include Ithkuil, Kotava, Lojban (and its predecessor Loglan, both of which are also schematic), and even the fictional-setting Láadan.
Lojban (pronounced ) is a constructed, syntactically unambiguous human language, succeeding the Loglan project.

Experimental language

experimental
Engineered languages (engelangs ), further subdivided into logical languages (loglangs), philosophical languages and experimental languages; devised for the purpose of experimentation in logic, philosophy, or linguistics;
An experimental language is a constructed language designed for linguistics research, often on the relationship between language and thought.

Engineered language

logical languagelogicalengineered
Engineered languages (engelangs ), further subdivided into logical languages (loglangs), philosophical languages and experimental languages; devised for the purpose of experimentation in logic, philosophy, or linguistics;
Engineered languages (often abbreviated to engelangs, or, less commonly, engilangs) are constructed languages devised to test or prove some hypotheses about how languages work or might work.

Philosophical language

philosophicalperfect languagephilosophical languages
Engineered languages (engelangs ), further subdivided into logical languages (loglangs), philosophical languages and experimental languages; devised for the purpose of experimentation in logic, philosophy, or linguistics;
A philosophical language is any constructed language that is constructed from first principles, like a logical language, but may entail a strong claim of absolute perfection or transcendent or even mystical truth rather than satisfaction of pragmatic goals.

Ithkuil

Examples include Ithkuil, Kotava, Lojban (and its predecessor Loglan, both of which are also schematic), and even the fictional-setting Láadan.
Ithkuil is an experimental constructed language created by John Quijada, designed to express deeper levels of human cognition briefly yet overtly and clearly, particularly with regard to human categorization.

Loglan

Examples include Ithkuil, Kotava, Lojban (and its predecessor Loglan, both of which are also schematic), and even the fictional-setting Láadan.
Loglan is a constructed language originally designed for linguistic research, particularly for investigating the Sapir–Whorf Hypothesis.

Languages constructed by J. R. R. Tolkien

languages invented by Tolkienlanguages of Middle-earththe fictional languages
Among classical "fictional natural languages" are Klingon from the science-fiction franchise Star Trek and the languages created by fantasy writer J. R. R. Tolkien.
The philologist and author J. R. R. Tolkien created a number of constructed languages, including languages devised for fictional settings.

Atlantean language

Atlanteanlanguage
Other examples include Dothraki and Valyrian from Game of Thrones', 'Trigedasleng from The 100, Atlantean from Atlantis: The Lost Empire'', Kēlen by Sylvia Sotomayor and aUI by W. John Weilgart.
The Atlantean language is a constructed language created by Marc Okrand for the Disney film Atlantis: The Lost Empire.

Native Tongue (Elgin novel)

Native TongueNative Tongue'' (Suzette Haden Elgin novel)
Thus, a "better" language should allow the speaker to think more clearly or intelligently or to encompass more points of view; this was the intention of Suzette Haden Elgin in creating Láadan, a feminist language embodied in her feminist science fiction series Native Tongue.
A group of women, part of a worldwide group of linguists who facilitate human communication with alien races, create a new language for women as an act of resistance.

Newspeak

brainwash peoplelanguagelanguage reduction
A constructed language could also be used to restrict thought, as in George Orwell's Newspeak, or to simplify thought, as in Toki Pona.
Newspeak is also a constructed language, of planned phonology, grammar, and vocabulary, like Basic English, which Orwell promoted (1942–44) during the Second World War (1939–45), and later rejected in the essay "Politics and the English Language" (1946), wherein he criticises the bad usage of English in his day: dying metaphors, pretentious diction, and high-flown rhetoric, which produce the meaningless words of doublespeak, the product of unclear reasoning.