Content clause

indirect questiondeclarative content clausedirect questionreported questionthat''-clauses
In grammar, a content clause is a subordinate clause that provides content implied or commented upon by its main clause.wikipedia
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Dependent clause

subordinate clausesubordinate clausessubordinate
In grammar, a content clause is a subordinate clause that provides content implied or commented upon by its main clause.
The different types of dependent clauses include content clauses (noun clauses), relative (adjectival) clauses, and adverbial clauses.

Adjective

adjectivesadjectivalattributive adjective
Similarly with certain verb-like adjectives:
Other constructs that often modify nouns include prepositional phrases (as in "a rebel without a cause"), relative clauses (as in "the man who wasn't there"), and infinitive phrases (as in "a cake to die for"). Some nouns can also take complements such as content clauses (as in "the idea that I would do that"), but these are not commonly considered modifiers.

Question

answerwh-questionquestions
Such clauses correspond to direct questions, which are questions actually asked.
As well as direct questions (such as Where are my keys?), there also exist indirect questions (also called interrogative content clauses), such as where my keys are.

Indirect speech

indirect discoursereported speechindirect
Reported questions (as in the last of the examples) are also subject to the tense and other changes that apply generally in indirect speech.
In grammar, indirect speech often makes use of certain syntactic structures such as content clauses ("that" clauses, such as (that) he was coming), and sometimes infinitive phrases.

Interrogative

interrogative sentenceinterrogative moodQuestions
There are two main kinds of content clauses: declarative content clauses (or that-clauses), which correspond to declarative sentences, and interrogative content clauses, which correspond to interrogative sentences. For more information see interrogative mood and English grammar.
Indirect questions (or interrogative content clauses) are subordinate clauses used within sentences to refer to a question (as opposed to direct questions, which are interrogative sentences themselves).

English grammar

Englishgrammarthere
For more information see interrogative mood and English grammar.
content clauses, i.e. that clauses and certain others: certain that he was right, unsure where they are;

Grammar

grammaticalgrammaticallyrules of language
In grammar, a content clause is a subordinate clause that provides content implied or commented upon by its main clause.

Independent clause

main clausematrix clauseindependent clauses
In grammar, a content clause is a subordinate clause that provides content implied or commented upon by its main clause.

Otto Jespersen

JespersenJespersen, OttoOtto
The term was coined by Danish linguist Otto Jespersen.

Sentence (linguistics)

sentencesentencesdeclarative sentence
There are two main kinds of content clauses: declarative content clauses (or that-clauses), which correspond to declarative sentences, and interrogative content clauses, which correspond to interrogative sentences.

Object (grammar)

objectdirect objectindirect object
They often serve as direct objects of verbs of reporting, cognition, perception, and so on. In this use, the conjunction that may head the clause, but is often omitted, that is, unvoiced:

Conjunction (grammar)

conjunctionconjunctionssubordinating conjunction
They often serve as direct objects of verbs of reporting, cognition, perception, and so on. In this use, the conjunction that may head the clause, but is often omitted, that is, unvoiced:

Head (linguistics)

headheadsheaded
They often serve as direct objects of verbs of reporting, cognition, perception, and so on. In this use, the conjunction that may head the clause, but is often omitted, that is, unvoiced:

Complement (linguistics)

complementcomplementscomplemented
They also often serve as complements of nouns—both nouns corresponding to the above verbs, and nouns like fact, idea, and so on. Here, that is almost always included:

Subject (grammar)

subjectsubjectsgrammatical subject
Finally, they can serve as subjects, or as direct objects of verbs that link them to adjectives or other predicatives.

Linking verb

link
Finally, they can serve as subjects, or as direct objects of verbs that link them to adjectives or other predicatives.

Predicative expression

predicativepredicative adjectivepredicatively
Finally, they can serve as subjects, or as direct objects of verbs that link them to adjectives or other predicatives.

Syntactic expletive

expletiveexpletivesdummy
In this use, they are commonly postponed to the end of their main clause, with an expletive it standing in their original place:

Syntax

syntacticsyntacticalsyntactically
Where are the files?'' Notice how, in English (and in some other languages), different syntax is used in direct and indirect questions: direct questions normally use subject-verb inversion, while indirect questions do not.

Inversion (linguistics)

inversioninvertedinverting
Where are the files?'' Notice how, in English (and in some other languages), different syntax is used in direct and indirect questions: direct questions normally use subject-verb inversion, while indirect questions do not.

Grammatical tense

tensetensesverb tense
Reported questions (as in the last of the examples) are also subject to the tense and other changes that apply generally in indirect speech.

Question mark

????interrogation point
The question mark is not used for indirect questions.

Subjunctive mood

subjunctivePresent subjunctiveconjunctive
Subjunctives occur most often, although not exclusively, in subordinate clauses, particularly that-clauses.

Interrogative word

interrogative pronouninterrogativeinterrogative pronouns
They may be used in both direct questions (Where is he going?) and in indirect questions (I wonder where he is going). In English and various other languages the same forms are also used as relative pronouns in certain relative clauses (The country where he was born) and certain adverb clauses (I go where he goes).

English clause syntax

conditionalfronting
Particular types of dependent clause include relative clauses, content clauses and adverbial clauses.