Continental Congress

CongressContinental Congressman from DelawareDelegate to the Continental CongressContinental CongressmanSecond Continental CongressContinentalContinental Congressmen[Continental] Congressa unified continental governmentcentral government
The Continental Congress, also known as the Philadelphia Congress, was a convention of delegates called together from the Thirteen Colonies.wikipedia
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American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican RevolutionAmerican War of Independence
It waged war with Great Britain, made a militia treaty with France, and funded the war effort with loans and paper money.
Twelve colonies formed a Continental Congress to coordinate their resistance, establishing committees and conventions that effectively seized power.

Early American currency

continental currencyContinentalContinentals
It waged war with Great Britain, made a militia treaty with France, and funded the war effort with loans and paper money.
The Continental Congress also issued paper money during the Revolution, known as Continental currency, to fund the war effort.

Congress of the Confederation

CongressConfederation CongressContinental Congress
The third Continental Congress was the Congress of the Confederation, under the Articles of Confederation.
The newly reorganized Congress at the time continued to refer itself as the Continental Congress throughout its eight-year history, although modern historians separate it from the earlier bodies, which operated under slightly different rules and procedures until the later part of American Revolutionary War.

Thirteen Colonies

American coloniescoloniescolonial
The Continental Congress, also known as the Philadelphia Congress, was a convention of delegates called together from the Thirteen Colonies.
Grievances with the British government led to the American Revolution, in which the colonies collaborated in forming the Continental Congress.

First Continental Congress

FirstContinental Congress1st Continental Congress
The First Continental Congress met briefly in Carpenter's Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from September 5 to October 26, 1774.
The Congress also called for another Continental Congress in the event that their petition was unsuccessful in halting enforcement of the Intolerable Acts.

Virginia

VACommonwealth of VirginiaVa.
It established a Continental Army, giving command to one of its members, George Washington of Virginia. As the ambassador to France, Benjamin Franklin not only secured the "bridge loan" for the national budget, but he also persuaded France to send an army of about 6,000 soldiers across the Atlantic Ocean to America—and also to dispatch a large squadron of French warships under Comte de Grasse to the coasts of Virginia and North Carolina. 1) The passage of the Northwest Ordinance in 1787. This ordinance accepted the abolition of all claims to the land west of Pennsylvania and north of the Ohio River by the states of Pennsylvania, Virginia, New York, Connecticut, and Massachusetts, and the ordinance established Federal control over all of this land in the Northwest Territory—with the goal that several new states should be created there. In the course of time, this land was divided over the course of many decades into Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, and part of Minnesota.
Virginians began to coordinate their actions with other colonies in 1773, and sent delegates to the Continental Congress the following year.

Samuel Adams

Sam AdamsSamuelAdams
Other notable delegates included Samuel Adams from Massachusetts Bay Colony, and Joseph Galloway and John Dickinson from the Province of Pennsylvania.
Parliament passed the Coercive Acts in 1774, at which time Adams attended the Continental Congress in Philadelphia which was convened to coordinate a colonial response.

Boston

Boston, MassachusettsBoston, MABoston, United States
Benjamin Franklin had put forth the idea of such a meeting the year before, but he was unable to convince the colonies of its necessity until the 1773 British blockade at the port of Boston in response to the Boston Tea Party.
Several weeks later, George Washington took over the militia after the Continental Congress established the Continental Army to unify the revolutionary effort.

Benjamin Franklin

FranklinBen FranklinFranklin, Benjamin
Benjamin Franklin had put forth the idea of such a meeting the year before, but he was unable to convince the colonies of its necessity until the 1773 British blockade at the port of Boston in response to the Boston Tea Party. In 1774 Benjamin Franklin convinced the colonial delegates to the Congress to form a representative body. As the ambassador to France, Benjamin Franklin not only secured the "bridge loan" for the national budget, but he also persuaded France to send an army of about 6,000 soldiers across the Atlantic Ocean to America—and also to dispatch a large squadron of French warships under Comte de Grasse to the coasts of Virginia and North Carolina.
The College was to become influential in guiding the founding documents of the United States: in the Continental Congress, for example, over one third of the college-affiliated men who contributed the Declaration of Independence between September 4, 1774, and July 4, 1776, were affiliated with the College.

Thomas Jefferson

JeffersonPresident JeffersonJeffersonian
Thomas Jefferson of Virginia drafted the declaration, and John Adams was a leader in the debates in favor of its adoption.
During the American Revolution, he represented Virginia in the Continental Congress that adopted the Declaration, drafted the law for religious freedom as a Virginia legislator, and served as a wartime governor (1779–1781).

Petition to the King

petitioned the kingpetitioned Parliamentpetitioned the British monarch
Convened in response to the Intolerable Acts passed by Parliament in 1774, the delegates organized an economic boycott of Great Britain in protest and petitioned the King for a redress of grievances.
These punitive Acts were vehemently opposed by the colonists, leading the newly formed Continental Congress to seek redress with King George III, in an attempt to reach a common understanding.

Joseph Galloway

Galloway
Other notable delegates included Samuel Adams from Massachusetts Bay Colony, and Joseph Galloway and John Dickinson from the Province of Pennsylvania.
Galloway was a member of the Continental Congress in 1774, where he proposed a compromise plan for Union with Great Britain which would provide the colonies with their own parliament subject to the Crown.

Articles of Confederation

Articles of Confederation and Perpetual UnionArticles of Confederation and Perpetual Union.Confederation
The third Continental Congress was the Congress of the Confederation, under the Articles of Confederation.
A copy was made for each state and one was kept by the Congress.

North Carolina

NCNorthN.C.
As the ambassador to France, Benjamin Franklin not only secured the "bridge loan" for the national budget, but he also persuaded France to send an army of about 6,000 soldiers across the Atlantic Ocean to America—and also to dispatch a large squadron of French warships under Comte de Grasse to the coasts of Virginia and North Carolina.
On April 12, 1776, the colony became the first to instruct its delegates to the Continental Congress to vote for independence from the British Crown, through the Halifax Resolves passed by the North Carolina Provincial Congress.

New York (state)

New YorkNYNew York State
1) The passage of the Northwest Ordinance in 1787. This ordinance accepted the abolition of all claims to the land west of Pennsylvania and north of the Ohio River by the states of Pennsylvania, Virginia, New York, Connecticut, and Massachusetts, and the ordinance established Federal control over all of this land in the Northwest Territory—with the goal that several new states should be created there. In the course of time, this land was divided over the course of many decades into Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, and part of Minnesota.
The Stamp Act Congress met in the city on October 19 of that year, composed of representatives from across the Thirteen Colonies who set the stage for the Continental Congress to follow.

President of the Continental Congress

PresidentPresident of CongressPresidents of the United States in Congress Assembled
The delegates chose a presiding President of the Continental Congress to monitor the debate, maintain order, and make sure journals were kept and documents and letters were published and delivered.
The President of the Continental Congress was the presiding officer of the Continental Congress, the convention of delegates that emerged as the first (transitional) national government of the United States during the American Revolution.

James Madison

MadisonPresident MadisonPresident James Madison
In addition to their slowness, the lack of coercive power in the Continental Congress was harshly criticized by James Madison when arguing for the need of a Federal Constitution.
Born into a prominent Virginia planting family, Madison served as a member of the Virginia House of Delegates and the Continental Congress during and after the American Revolutionary War.

Charles Thomson

Secretary of the Continental Congress
It ran with very low overhead of 4 men for the 56 delegates, having only Secretary Charles Thomson as its operating officer for the whole period from 1774 to 1789, supported by a scribe, a doorman, and a messenger.
Charles Thomson (November 29, 1729 – August 16, 1824) was an Irish-born Patriot leader in Philadelphia during the American Revolution and the secretary of the Continental Congress (1774–1789) throughout its existence.

United States Constitution

ConstitutionU.S. Constitutionconstitutional
In addition to their slowness, the lack of coercive power in the Continental Congress was harshly criticized by James Madison when arguing for the need of a Federal Constitution. When the Articles of Confederation were superseded by the Constitution of the United States, the Confederation Congress was superseded by the United States Congress.
From September 5, 1774, to March 1, 1781, the Continental Congress functioned as the provisional government of the United States.

Stamp Act Congress

Stamp Act Congress Delegate
To present a united front in their opposition to the Stamp act, delegates of the Provinces of British North America met in the Stamp Act Congress, which convened in New York City from 7 through 25 October 1765.

Olive Branch Petition

final attempt to avert warpetitions to the Crown for intervention with Parliamentsecond petition
July 8: Second petition to the king (the Olive Branch Petition) is signed and sent to London
The Olive Branch Petition was adopted by the Second Continental Congress on July 5, 1775 and signed on July 8 in a final attempt to avoid war between Great Britain and the Thirteen Colonies in America.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonPresident Washington
It established a Continental Army, giving command to one of its members, George Washington of Virginia.
During the Revolutionary War he was a delegate to the Continental Congress, was unanimously appointed commander-in-chief of the Army, and led an allied campaign to victory at the Siege of Yorktown ending the conflict.

Province of Georgia

Georgiacolony of GeorgiaGeorgia Colony
All of the colonies sent delegates except the newest and most southerly one, the Province of Georgia – which needed the British Army's protection in order to contend with attacks from several Native American tribes.
Georgia was a member of the Continental Congress, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, the tenth state to ratify the Articles of Confederation on July 24, 1778, and the fourth state to be admitted to the Union under the U.S. Constitution, on January 2, 1788.

John Dickinson

Dickinson[John] Dickinson
Other notable delegates included Samuel Adams from Massachusetts Bay Colony, and Joseph Galloway and John Dickinson from the Province of Pennsylvania.

Continental Marines

MarinesColonial marinesContinental Marine Corps
November 10: Congress establishes the Continental Marines
The Corps was formed by the Continental Congress on November 10, 1775 and was disbanded in 1783.