Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others

Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and the Exploitation of the Prostitution of OthersConventionconventionConventionConvention of 1949
The Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others was approved by the United Nations General Assembly on 2 December 1949 and entered into force on 25 July 1951.wikipedia
41 Related Articles

Forced prostitution

commercial sexual exploitationforced into prostitutionenforced prostitution
The Convention supersedes a number of earlier conventions that covered some aspects of forced prostitution.
In 1949, the UN General Assembly adopted the [[Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others]].

Brothel

brothelsbordellowhorehouse
The Convention requires state parties to punish any person who "procures, entices, or leads away, for purposes of prostitution, another person, even with the consent of that person", "exploits the prostitution of another person, even with the consent of that person" (Article 1), or runs a brothel or rents accommodations for prostitution purposes (Article 2).
On 2 December 1949, the United Nations General Assembly approved the [[Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others]].

Prostitution

prostituteprostituteswhore
''"Whereas prostitution and the accompanying evil of the traffic in persons for the purpose of prostitution are incompatible with the dignity and worth of the human person and endanger the welfare of the individual, the family and the community"''
In 1949, the UN General Assembly adopted a [[Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others|convention]] stating that "prostitution and the accompanying evil of the traffic in persons for the purpose of prostitution are incompatible with the dignity and worth of the human person", requiring all signing parties to punish pimps and brothel owners and operators and to abolish all special treatment or registration of prostitutes.

Prostitution law

regulateddecriminalization of prostitutionprostitution
The United Nations [[Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others]] favors criminalizing the activities of those seen as exploiting or coercing prostitutes (so-called "pimping" and "procuring" laws), while leaving sex workers free from regulation.

Sexual slavery

sexual exploitationsex slavewhite slavery
In 1949 the UN General Assembly adopted the [[Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others]] (the 1949 Convention).

Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children

2000 UN TIP ProtocolProtocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in PersonsPalermo Protocol on human trafficking
The Trafficking protocol (2000) to the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime has used a different definition of "trafficking" to that in the 1949 Convention, and has been ratified by many more countries.

International Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Women and Children

1921 International Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Women and ChildrenInternational Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Women of Full Age
This Protocol was superseded by the [[Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others]] (1949) whose Preamble recalls the 1921 Convention together with "1910 Convention for Suppression of White Slave Traffic", and "1933 Convention on the Suppression of Traffic of Women of Full Age", again tabled by the United Nations Secretary-General.

International Day for the Abolition of Slavery

The [[Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others]] was approved by the United Nations General Assembly on December 2, 1949.

International Abolitionist Federation

abolish prostitution lawsabolitionismAbolitionism (prostitution)
The United Nations' 1949 [[Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others]] was only ratified by a few states since most would have had to first change their laws related to prostitution.

United Nations General Assembly

General AssemblyUN General AssemblyGeneral Assembly of the United Nations
The Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others was approved by the United Nations General Assembly on 2 December 1949 and entered into force on 25 July 1951.

Human trafficking

traffickingtrafficking in personstrafficked
''"Whereas prostitution and the accompanying evil of the traffic in persons for the purpose of prostitution are incompatible with the dignity and worth of the human person and endanger the welfare of the individual, the family and the community"''

Employment agency

employment agencieslabour exchangejob placement
And also, they are required to take the necessary measure for the supervision of employment agencies in order to prevent persons seeking employment, in particular women and children, from being exposed to the danger of prostitution (Article 20).

International Court of Justice

World CourtICJInternational Court of Justice (ICJ)
A dispute between the parties relating to the interpretation or application of the Convention may, at the request of any one of the parties to the dispute, be referred to the International Court of Justice (Article 22).

Germany

GermanGERFederal Republic of Germany
For example, in countries such as Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Greece, Turkey, and other countries, voluntary prostitution is legal and regulated as an "occupation".

Netherlands

DutchThe NetherlandsHolland
For example, in countries such as Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Greece, Turkey, and other countries, voluntary prostitution is legal and regulated as an "occupation".

New Zealand

NZLNZKiwi
For example, in countries such as Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Greece, Turkey, and other countries, voluntary prostitution is legal and regulated as an "occupation".

Greece

GreekHellenic RepublicGreeks
For example, in countries such as Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Greece, Turkey, and other countries, voluntary prostitution is legal and regulated as an "occupation".

Turkey

TurkishRepublic of TurkeyTUR
For example, in countries such as Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Greece, Turkey, and other countries, voluntary prostitution is legal and regulated as an "occupation".

United Nations

UNU.N.the United Nations
The Trafficking protocol (2000) to the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime has used a different definition of "trafficking" to that in the 1949 Convention, and has been ratified by many more countries.

United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime

Convention against Transnational Organized CrimeConvention against Transnational Organised CrimeUN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime
The Trafficking protocol (2000) to the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime has used a different definition of "trafficking" to that in the 1949 Convention, and has been ratified by many more countries.

Centre for Human Rights

The Centre for Human Rights, specifically the secretariat of the Working Group on Slavery, in close co-operation with the Centre for Social Development and Humanitarian Affairs of the Department of International Economic and Social Affairs, actively monitors the Convention.

Centre for Social Development and Humanitarian Affairs

The Centre for Human Rights, specifically the secretariat of the Working Group on Slavery, in close co-operation with the Centre for Social Development and Humanitarian Affairs of the Department of International Economic and Social Affairs, actively monitors the Convention.

Prostitution in France

FranceRéglementationFrench system of licensed prostitution
Brothels became illegal in 1946, and France signed the [[Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others]] in 1960.