Cook Inlet

Turnagain Arm115 Cook InletCook Inlet AreaKnik ArmTurnagain Arm and the Kenai Mountains
Cook Inlet (Dena'ina: Tikahtnu, Залив Кука) stretches 180 mi from the Gulf of Alaska to Anchorage in south-central Alaska.wikipedia
311 Related Articles

Denaʼina language

Dena'inaDena'ina languageDena'ina Athabascan
Cook Inlet (Dena'ina: Tikahtnu, Залив Кука) stretches 180 mi from the Gulf of Alaska to Anchorage in south-central Alaska.
Denaʼina, also Tanaina, is the Athabaskan language of the region surrounding Cook Inlet.

Anchorage, Alaska

AnchorageAnchorage, AKMunicipality of Anchorage
Cook Inlet (Dena'ina: Tikahtnu, Залив Кука) stretches 180 mi from the Gulf of Alaska to Anchorage in south-central Alaska.
Anchorage is in Southcentral Alaska, at the terminus of the Cook Inlet, on a peninsula formed by the Knik Arm to the north and the Turnagain Arm to the south.

Gulf of Alaska

gulf
Cook Inlet (Dena'ina: Tikahtnu, Залив Кука) stretches 180 mi from the Gulf of Alaska to Anchorage in south-central Alaska.
The coast is heavily indented with Cook Inlet and Prince William Sound, the two largest connected bodies of water.

Turnagain Arm

Cook Inlet branches into the Knik Arm and Turnagain Arm at its northern end, almost surrounding Anchorage.
It is one of two narrow branches at the north end of Cook Inlet, the other being Knik Arm.

Knik Arm

Cook Inlet branches into the Knik Arm and Turnagain Arm at its northern end, almost surrounding Anchorage.
It is one of two narrow branches of Cook Inlet, the other being Turnagain Arm.

Susitna River

Susitna
The watershed covers about 100,000 km² of southern Alaska, east of the Aleutian Range, south and east of the Alaska Range, receiving water from its tributaries the Knik River, the Little Susitna River, and the Susitna and Matanuska rivers.
The river stretches from the Susitna Glacier to Cook Inlet's Knik Arm.

Little Susitna River

The watershed covers about 100,000 km² of southern Alaska, east of the Aleutian Range, south and east of the Alaska Range, receiving water from its tributaries the Knik River, the Little Susitna River, and the Susitna and Matanuska rivers.
Little Susitna River heads at Mint Glacier on Montana Peak, in Talkeetna Mountains at 61.85833°N, -149.05833°W, flows southwest to Cook Inlet, 13 mi west of Anchorage, Alaska Cook Inlet Low.

Matanuska River

MatanuskaMatanuska River Valley
The watershed covers about 100,000 km² of southern Alaska, east of the Aleutian Range, south and east of the Alaska Range, receiving water from its tributaries the Knik River, the Little Susitna River, and the Susitna and Matanuska rivers.
Formed by the confluence of its east and south forks, the Matanuska River flows generally southwest to the Knik Arm of Cook Inlet.

Knik River

Knik
The watershed covers about 100,000 km² of southern Alaska, east of the Aleutian Range, south and east of the Alaska Range, receiving water from its tributaries the Knik River, the Little Susitna River, and the Susitna and Matanuska rivers.
Its source is at Knik Glacier, from which it flows northwest and west and empties into the head of Cook Inlet's Knik Arm, near the mouth of the Matanuska River.

Mount Redoubt

Redoubt VolcanoMt. RedoubtMount Redoubt (Alaska)
Within the watershed there are several national parks and the active volcano Mount Redoubt, along with three other historically active volcanoes. The Cook Inlet region contains active volcanoes, including Augustine Volcano and Mount Redoubt.
Located at the head of the Chigmit Mountains subrange in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, the mountain is just west of Cook Inlet, in the Kenai Peninsula Borough about 110 miles (180 km) southwest of Anchorage.

Augustine Volcano

Augustine IslandMount AugustineAugustine
The Cook Inlet region contains active volcanoes, including Augustine Volcano and Mount Redoubt.
It forms Augustine Island in southwestern Cook Inlet in the Kenai Peninsula Borough of southcentral coastal Alaska, 174 mi southwest of Anchorage.

Shelikof Strait

strait
On its south end merges with Shelikof Strait, Stevenson Entrance, Kennedy Entrance and Chugach Passage.
Cook Inlet is at its northern end.

Denali

Mount McKinleyMt. McKinleyMount Denali
The watershed includes the drainage areas of Denali (formerly named Mount McKinley).
A British naval captain and explorer, George Vancouver, is the first European on record to have sighted Denali, when he noted "distant stupendous mountains" while surveying the Knik Arm of the Cook Inlet on May 6, 1794.

Farallon Steamship Disaster

Farallonstruck
The S.S. Farallon was a wooden Alaskan Steamship Company liner that struck Black Reef in the Cook Inlet on January 5, 1910.
The Farallon Steamship Disaster was the wreck of a wooden Alaska Steamship Company passenger liner, SS Farallon, that hit Black Reef in Cook Inlet in the Territory of Alaska on 5 January 1910.

Drift River Terminal Facility

Drift RiverDrift River oil terminal
In 2009 a lahar from Mt. Redoubt threatened the Drift River oil terminal.
It is located in Alaska along Cook Inlet, at the terminus of the Drift River, an historic floodplain of nearby volcanic Mount Redoubt.

Girdwood, Anchorage, Alaska

GirdwoodGirdwood, AlaskaGirdwood, Anchorage
During the 1964 Alaska earthquake, areas around the head of Turnagain Arm near Girdwood and Portage dropped as much as 8 ft by subsidence and subsequent tidal action.
Located near the end of the Turnagain Arm of Cook Inlet, Girdwood lies in a valley in the southwestern Chugach Mountains, surrounded by seven glaciers feeding into a number of creeks, which either converge within the valley or empty directly into the arm.

Kenai Peninsula

Kenai Peninsula, AlaskaEastern Kenai PeninsulaKenaitze
Along the East side of the Cook Inlet, the Kenai Peninsula is host to many smaller fishing communities, such as Kenai, Soldotna, Ninilchick, Anchor Point and Homer.
It is separated from the mainland on the west by Cook Inlet and on the east by Prince William Sound.

Alaska Railroad

Alaska Central RailwayAlaska Central RailroadThe Alaska Railroad
Few white people visited upper Cook Inlet until construction of the Alaska Railroad along the eastern shores of Turnagain Arm and Knik Arm of Cook Inlet around 1915.
This route carried passengers, freight and mail to the upper Turnagain Arm.

Chuitna River (Alaska)

Chuitna River
Alaska has approximately half the known coal reserves in the U.S. For decades, there has been a proposal to build a large coal mine (the Chuitna Coal Mine) on the west side of Cook Inlet near the Chuitna River, and the native village of Tyonek, Alaska.
The Chuitna River, sometimes called the Chuit, emerges from a broad expanse of forest and wetlands west of Anchorage and drains into Cook Inlet.

Chuitna Coal Project

Chuitna Coal Mine
Alaska has approximately half the known coal reserves in the U.S. For decades, there has been a proposal to build a large coal mine (the Chuitna Coal Mine) on the west side of Cook Inlet near the Chuitna River, and the native village of Tyonek, Alaska.
The Chuitna Coal Project is a proposed coal strip mine that, if granted state and federal permits, would be built about 45 mi southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, in an area known as the Beluga Coal Fields near the Chuitna River and the small communities of Tyonek and Beluga in upper Cook Inlet.

Northwest Passage

North-West PassageNorth West PassageNorthwestern Passages
Other Europeans to visit Cook Inlet include the 1778 expedition of James Cook, its namesake, who sailed into it while searching for the Northwest Passage.
Before reaching 65°N they found the coastline pushing them further south, but Gore convinced Cook to sail on into the Cook Inlet in the hope of finding the route.

James Cook

Captain CookCaptain James CookCook
Other Europeans to visit Cook Inlet include the 1778 expedition of James Cook, its namesake, who sailed into it while searching for the Northwest Passage.
After leaving Nootka Sound, Cook explored and mapped the coast all the way to the Bering Strait, on the way identifying what came to be known as Cook Inlet in Alaska.

Eklutna, Anchorage

EklutnaEklutna, Alaska
The natives of the Eklutna village are the descendants of the residents of eight native villages around upper Cook Inlet.
142 of the Alaska Railroad and the Mile 26 of the Glenn Highway 2 mi from the mouth of the Eklutna River at the head of the Knik Arm of Cook Inlet, at 61.45833°N, -149.36222°W in the Anchorage Recording District.

Port of Anchorage

AnchorageAnchorage Port Commission
However, over 95% of freight entering Alaska comes through the Port of Anchorage, which is served by major container ship companies and other carriers.
The Port of Alaska is located on the Anchorage side of the Knik Arm of the Cook Inlet on the Pacific Ocean.

1964 Alaska earthquake

Good Friday earthquake1964 earthquakeGreat Alaska earthquake
During the 1964 Alaska earthquake, areas around the head of Turnagain Arm near Girdwood and Portage dropped as much as 8 ft by subsidence and subsequent tidal action.
Anchorage was not hit by tsunamis, but downtown Anchorage was heavily damaged, and parts of the city built on sandy bluffs overlying "Bootlegger Cove clay" near Cook Inlet, most notably the Turnagain neighborhood, suffered landslide damage.