A report on Copyright

European output of books before the advent of copyright, 6th century to 18th century. Blue shows printed books. Log-lin plot; a straight line therefore shows an exponential increase.
The Statute of Anne (the Copyright Act 1709) came into force in 1710.
The Pirate Publisher—An International Burlesque that has the Longest Run on Record, from Puck, 1886, satirizes the then-existing situation where a publisher could profit by simply copying newly published works from one country, and publishing them in another, and vice versa.
A copyright symbol used in copyright notice
A copyright symbol embossed on a piece of paper.
Expansion of US copyright law (currently based on the date of creation or publication)
DVD: All rights reserved

Type of intellectual property that gives its owner the exclusive right to copy, distribute, adapt, display, and perform a creative work, usually for a limited time.

- Copyright
European output of books before the advent of copyright, 6th century to 18th century. Blue shows printed books. Log-lin plot; a straight line therefore shows an exponential increase.

85 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Berne Convention

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The Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works, usually known as the Berne Convention, is an international agreement governing copyright, which was first accepted in Berne, Switzerland, in 1886.

Public domain logo from the Creative Commons Corporation

Public domain

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The public domain consists of all the creative work to which no exclusive intellectual property rights apply.

The public domain consists of all the creative work to which no exclusive intellectual property rights apply.

Public domain logo from the Creative Commons Corporation
Newton's own copy of his Principia, with hand-written corrections for the second edition
The 1925 film Go West entered the public domain in the US in 2021 due to expiration of its copyright after 95 years.
Creative Commons' Public Domain Mark
An English logo of the 2018/2019 Public Domain Day in Poland
Visual created for Public Domain Day. Features Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa, as it is famously part of the public domain

The French poet Alfred de Vigny equated the expiration of copyright with a work falling "into the sink hole of public domain" and if the public domain receives any attention from intellectual property lawyers it is still treated as little more than that which is left when intellectual property rights, such as copyright, patents, and trademarks, expire or are abandoned.

Expansion of U.S. copyright law (assuming authors create their works at age 35 and live for seventy years)

Copyright Act of 1976

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Expansion of U.S. copyright law (assuming authors create their works at age 35 and live for seventy years)

The Copyright Act of 1976 is a United States copyright law and remains the primary basis of copyright law in the United States, as amended by several later enacted copyright provisions.

TRIPS Agreement

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International legal agreement between all the member nations of the World Trade Organization (WTO).

International legal agreement between all the member nations of the World Trade Organization (WTO).

Specifically, TRIPS requires WTO members to provide copyright rights, covering authors and other copyright holders, as well as holders of related rights, namely performers, sound recording producers and broadcasting organisations; geographical indications; industrial designs; integrated circuit layout-designs; patents; new plant varieties; trademarks; trade names and undisclosed or confidential information.

Joseph Story wrote the opinion in Folsom v. Marsh.

Fair use

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Joseph Story wrote the opinion in Folsom v. Marsh.
The unpublished nature of J. D. Salinger's letters was a key issue in the court's analysis of the second fair use factor in Salinger v. Random House.
The Ninth Circuit has held that the use of thumbnails in image search engines is fair use.

Fair use is a doctrine in United States law that permits limited use of copyrighted material without having to first acquire permission from the copyright holder.

Limitations and exceptions to copyright

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Limitations and exceptions to copyright are provisions, in local copyright law or Berne Convention, which allow for copyrighted works to be used without a license from the copyright owner.

Marcel Duchamp's 1919 piece L.H.O.O.Q., a derivative work based on the Mona Lisa.

Derivative work

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Marcel Duchamp's 1919 piece L.H.O.O.Q., a derivative work based on the Mona Lisa.
Artists copying the "Mona Lisa". The original picture is in the public domain, but both the derivative work (the copy of the picture) and this photograph would attract their own copyright. The artists and photographer were working for the copyright holder, who has released the rights under a "CC BY-SA 2.0" license.
In U.S. law, this derivative work of a chest radiograph (which is in the Public Domain) is copyrightable because of the additional graphics. Yet the chest radiograph component of the work is still in the Public Domain.
Screenshot of Half.com pop-up ad over Amazon's Web page c. 2008
Graphic from the United States Copyright Office, 1959, giving examples of derivative works.

In copyright law, a derivative work is an expressive creation that includes major copyrightable elements of an original, previously created first work (the underlying work).

Intellectual property laws such as trademark laws forbid the sale of infringing goods like these "McDnoald's" [sic] and "NKIE" [sic] sandals.

Intellectual property

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Category of property that includes intangible creations of the human intellect.

Category of property that includes intangible creations of the human intellect.

Intellectual property laws such as trademark laws forbid the sale of infringing goods like these "McDnoald's" [sic] and "NKIE" [sic] sandals.
The Statute of Anne came into force in 1710
Demonstration in Sweden in support of file sharing, 2006
"Copying is not theft!" badge with a character resembling Mickey Mouse in reference to the "in popular culture" rationale behind the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act of 1998
The free culture movement champions the production of content that bears little or no restrictions.
Expansion of U.S. copyright law (Assuming authors create their works by age 35 and live for seventy years)

The best-known types are copyrights, patents, trademarks, and trade secrets.

Expansion of U.S. copyright law (assuming authors create their works 35 years before their death)

Copyright Term Extension Act

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The Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act – also known as the Copyright Term Extension Act, Sonny Bono Act, or (derisively) the Mickey Mouse Protection Act – extended copyright terms in the United States in 1998.

The Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act – also known as the Copyright Term Extension Act, Sonny Bono Act, or (derisively) the Mickey Mouse Protection Act – extended copyright terms in the United States in 1998.

Expansion of U.S. copyright law (assuming authors create their works 35 years before their death)
US Congressman Sonny Bono, sponsor of the Copyright Term Extension Act

Following the Copyright Act of 1976, copyright would last for the life of the author plus 50 years(or the last surviving author), or 75 years from publication or 100 years from creation,whichever is shorter for a work of corporate authorship (works made for hire)and anonymous and pseudonymous works.

A patent issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Patent

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Type of intellectual property that gives its owner the legal right to exclude others from making, using, or selling an invention for a limited period of time in exchange for publishing an enabling disclosure of the invention.

Type of intellectual property that gives its owner the legal right to exclude others from making, using, or selling an invention for a limited period of time in exchange for publishing an enabling disclosure of the invention.

A patent issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
The Venetian Patent Statute, issued by the Senate of Venice in 1474, and one of the earliest statutory patent systems in the world.
James Puckle's 1718 early autocannon was one of the first inventions required to provide a specification for a patent.
U.S. patents granted, 1790–2010.
The plate of the Martin ejector seat of a military aircraft, stating that the product is covered by multiple patents in the UK, South Africa, Canada and pending in "other" jurisdictions. Dübendorf Museum of Military Aviation.
Share of women amongst listed inventors and share of PCT applications with at least one woman as inventor for the top 20 origins 2020.

Similar grants included land patents, which were land grants by early state governments in the US, and printing patents, a precursor of modern copyright.