Coronary sinus

cardiac vein
The coronary sinus is a collection of veins joined together to form a large vessel that collects blood from the heart muscle (myocardium).wikipedia
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Heart

cardiachuman heartapex of the heart
The coronary sinus is a collection of veins joined together to form a large vessel that collects blood from the heart muscle (myocardium).
A small amount of blood from the coronary circulation also drains into the right atrium via the coronary sinus, which is immediately above and to the middle of the opening of the inferior vena cava.

Vein

veinsvenousvenous system
The coronary sinus is a collection of veins joined together to form a large vessel that collects blood from the heart muscle (myocardium).
Most of the blood of the coronary veins returns through the coronary sinus.

Inferior vena cava

inferiorIVCposterior vena cava
It delivers less-oxygenated blood to the right atrium, as do the superior and inferior venae cavae.
Together, the venae cavae (in addition to the coronary sinus, which carries blood from the muscle of the heart itself) form the venous counterparts of the aorta.

Atrium (heart)

right atriumatrialeft atrium
It delivers less-oxygenated blood to the right atrium, as do the superior and inferior venae cavae. It returns blood from the heart muscle, and is protected by a semicircular fold of the lining membrane of the auricle, the valve of coronary sinus (or valve of Thebesius).
The right atrium receives and holds deoxygenated blood from the superior vena cava, inferior vena cava, anterior cardiac veins and smallest cardiac veins and the coronary sinus, which it then sends down to the right ventricle (through the tricuspid valve), which in turn sends it to the pulmonary artery for pulmonary circulation.

Vieussens valve of the coronary sinus

valve of Vieussens
Its wall is partly muscular, and at its junction with the great cardiac vein is somewhat constricted and furnished with a valve, known as the valve of Vieussens consisting of two unequal segments.
The Vieussens valve of the coronary sinus is a valve and anatomic landmark between the coronary sinus and the great cardiac vein.

Valve of coronary sinus

Thebesian valvevalve of the coronary sinuscoronary sinus
It returns blood from the heart muscle, and is protected by a semicircular fold of the lining membrane of the auricle, the valve of coronary sinus (or valve of Thebesius). The valve of the coronary sinus is on the posterior, inferior surface of the heart, medial to the inferior vena cava opening, just superior to the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve.
The valve of the coronary sinus (Thebesian valve) is a semicircular fold of the lining membrane of the right atrium, at the orifice of the coronary sinus.

Middle cardiac vein

middle cardiac
The coronary sinus receives blood mainly from the small, middle, great and oblique cardiac veins.
The middle cardiac vein commences at the apex of the heart; ascends in the posterior longitudinal sulcus, and ends in the coronary sinus near its right extremity.

Small cardiac vein

small cardiac
The coronary sinus receives blood mainly from the small, middle, great and oblique cardiac veins.
The small cardiac vein runs in the coronary sulcus between the right atrium and ventricle and opens into the right extremity of the coronary sinus.

Great cardiac vein

great cardiac
Its wall is partly muscular, and at its junction with the great cardiac vein is somewhat constricted and furnished with a valve, known as the valve of Vieussens consisting of two unequal segments. The coronary sinus receives blood mainly from the small, middle, great and oblique cardiac veins. The coronary sinus starts at the junction of the great cardiac vein and the oblique vein of the left atrium.
It merges with the oblique vein of the left atrium to form the coronary sinus, which drains into the right atrium.

Oblique vein of the left atrium

Oblique vein of left atriumoblique cardiac veinoblique vein
The coronary sinus receives blood mainly from the small, middle, great and oblique cardiac veins. The coronary sinus starts at the junction of the great cardiac vein and the oblique vein of the left atrium.
The oblique vein of the left atrium (oblique vein of Marshall) is a small vessel which descends obliquely on the back of the left atrium and ends in the coronary sinus near its left extremity; it is continuous above with the ligament of the left vena cava (lig.

Anterior cardiac veins

anterior cardiac
The anterior cardiac veins do not drain into the coronary sinus but drain directly into the right atrium.
Unlike most cardiac veins, they do not end in the coronary sinus.

Posterior vein of the left ventricle

left posterior ventricular veinPosterior vein of left ventricle
It also receives blood from the left marginal vein and the left posterior ventricular vein.
The posterior vein of the left ventricle runs on the diaphragmatic surface of the left ventricle to the coronary sinus, but may end in the great cardiac vein.

Smallest cardiac veins

foramina venarum minimarumThebesian veinPericardial veins
Some small veins known as smallest cardiac veins drain directly into any of the four chambers of the heart.
Thebesian veins have been successfully identified by following the route of contrast flow - during catheterization procedures - from the subendocardium, through the thebesian veins, into larger veins, and into the coronary sinus.

Sinus venosus

sinus venarumVenosus
The sinus venosus also forms the SA node and the coronary sinus; in (most) Mammals only.

Cardiac muscle

myocardiumheart musclemyocardial
The coronary sinus is a collection of veins joined together to form a large vessel that collects blood from the heart muscle (myocardium).

Superior vena cava

superioranterior vena cavaSVC
It delivers less-oxygenated blood to the right atrium, as do the superior and inferior venae cavae.

Mammal

mammalsMammaliamammalian
It is present in all mammals, including humans.

Right atrioventricular orifice

atrioventricular opening
The coronary sinus drains into the right atrium, at the coronary sinus orifice, an opening between the inferior vena cava and the right atrioventricular orifice or tricuspid valve.

Tricuspid valve

tricuspidtricuspid valvesheart
The valve of the coronary sinus is on the posterior, inferior surface of the heart, medial to the inferior vena cava opening, just superior to the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve.

Left marginal vein

It also receives blood from the left marginal vein and the left posterior ventricular vein.

Atrioventricular node

AV nodeatrioventricularAV
The AV node lies at the lower back section of the interatrial septum near the opening of the coronary sinus, and conducts the normal electrical impulse from the atria to the ventricles.

AV nodal reentrant tachycardia

AV nodal re-entrant tachycardiaatrioventricular nodal re-entrant tachycardiaAVNRT
The slow pathway (which is usually targeted for ablation) is located inferior and slightly posterior to the AV node, often following the anterior margin of the coronary sinus.