Coronary stent

coronary artery stentheart stentstentstentingstentscoronarycoronary in-stent restenosisstent in the coronary artery
A coronary stent is a tube-shaped device placed in the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart, to keep the arteries open in the treatment of coronary heart disease.wikipedia
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Stent

stentsstent graftstenting
A coronary stent is a tube-shaped device placed in the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart, to keep the arteries open in the treatment of coronary heart disease. Similar stents and procedures are used in non-coronary vessels (e.g., in the legs in peripheral artery disease).
There is a wide variety of stents used for different purposes, from expandable coronary, vascular and biliary stents, to simple plastic stents used to allow the flow of urine between kidney and bladder.

Percutaneous coronary intervention

coronary angioplastyPCIpercutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty
It is used in a procedure called percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).
After this, an interventional cardiologist can perform a coronary angioplasty, using a balloon catheter in which a deflated balloon is advanced into the obstructed artery and inflated to relieve the narrowing; certain devices such as stents can be deployed to keep the blood vessel open.

Clopidogrel

Since platelets are involved in the clotting process, patients must take dual antiplatelet therapy starting immediately before or after stenting: usually an ADP receptor antagonist (e.g. clopidogrel or ticagrelor) and aspirin for up to one year and aspirin indefinitely.
It is also used together with aspirin in heart attacks and following the placement of a coronary artery stent (dual antiplatelet therapy).

Interventional cardiology

interventional cardiologistinterventional cardiologistsinterventional cardiac catheterization
The interventional cardiologist uses angiography to assess the location and estimate the size of the blockage ("lesion") by injecting a contrast medium through the guide catheter and viewing the flow of blood through the downstream coronary arteries.
Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI/Coronary angioplasty): the use of angioplasty for the treatment of obstruction of coronary arteries as a result of coronary artery disease. A deflated balloon catheter is advanced into the obstructed artery and inflated to relieve the narrowing; certain devices such as coronary stents can be deployed to keep the blood vessel open. Various other procedures can also be performed at the same time. After a heart attack, it can be restricted to the culprit vessel (the one whose obstruction or thrombosis is suspected of causing the event) or complete revascularization; complete revascularization is more efficacious in terms of major adverse cardiac events and all-cause mortality.

Coronary artery disease

coronary heart diseaseischemic heart diseaseischaemic heart disease
A coronary stent is a tube-shaped device placed in the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart, to keep the arteries open in the treatment of coronary heart disease.
Coronary interventions as angioplasty and coronary stent;

Drug-eluting stent

drug eluting stentdrug-eluting stentsdrug-eluting
Drug-eluting stents were developed with the intent of dealing with this problem: by releasing an antiproliferative drug (drugs typically used against cancer or as immunosuppressants), they can help reduce the incidence of "in-stent restenosis" (re-narrowing).
A drug-eluting stent (DES) is a peripheral or coronary stent (a scaffold) placed into narrowed, diseased peripheral or coronary arteries that slowly releases a drug to block cell proliferation.

Coronary artery bypass surgery

heart bypassbypass surgeryheart bypass surgery
The MASS-II trial compared PCI, CABG and optimum medical therapy for the treatment of multi-vessel coronary artery disease. The MASS-II trial showed no difference in cardiac death or acute MI among patients in the CABG, PCI, or MT group. However, it did show a significantly greater need for additional revascularization procedures in patients who underwent PCI.
Bypass surgery can provide relief of angina when the location of partial obstructions precludes improving blood flow with stents.

Coronary arteries

coronary arterycoronaryarteries
A coronary stent is a tube-shaped device placed in the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart, to keep the arteries open in the treatment of coronary heart disease.

Blood

human bloodhematologicalblood-forming
A coronary stent is a tube-shaped device placed in the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart, to keep the arteries open in the treatment of coronary heart disease.

Heart

cardiachuman heartapex of the heart
A coronary stent is a tube-shaped device placed in the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart, to keep the arteries open in the treatment of coronary heart disease.

Angina

angina pectorischest painstable angina
Stents reduce angina (chest pain) and have been shown to improve survivability and decrease adverse events in an acute myocardial infarction.

Myocardial infarction

heart attackheart attacksacute myocardial infarction
Stents reduce angina (chest pain) and have been shown to improve survivability and decrease adverse events in an acute myocardial infarction.

Peripheral artery disease

peripheral vascular diseaseperipheral arterial diseasearterial insufficiency
Similar stents and procedures are used in non-coronary vessels (e.g., in the legs in peripheral artery disease).

Angiography

angiogramarteriographyangiographic
The interventional cardiologist uses angiography to assess the location and estimate the size of the blockage ("lesion") by injecting a contrast medium through the guide catheter and viewing the flow of blood through the downstream coronary arteries.

Contrast agent

contrast mediumcontrast mediacontrast agents
The interventional cardiologist uses angiography to assess the location and estimate the size of the blockage ("lesion") by injecting a contrast medium through the guide catheter and viewing the flow of blood through the downstream coronary arteries.

Intravascular ultrasound

IVUSIntravascular ultrasound systemsultrasound
Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) may be used to assess the lesion's thickness and hardness ("calcification").

Catheter

catheterscatheterizationindwelling catheter
Drug-eluting stents are most often sold as a unit, with the stent in its collapsed form attached to the outside of a balloon catheter.

Platelet

plateletsplatelet aggregationplatelet count
Since platelets are involved in the clotting process, patients must take dual antiplatelet therapy starting immediately before or after stenting: usually an ADP receptor antagonist (e.g. clopidogrel or ticagrelor) and aspirin for up to one year and aspirin indefinitely.

Antiplatelet drug

antiplateletplatelet aggregation inhibitorantiplatelet agent
Since platelets are involved in the clotting process, patients must take dual antiplatelet therapy starting immediately before or after stenting: usually an ADP receptor antagonist (e.g. clopidogrel or ticagrelor) and aspirin for up to one year and aspirin indefinitely.

Ticagrelor

Since platelets are involved in the clotting process, patients must take dual antiplatelet therapy starting immediately before or after stenting: usually an ADP receptor antagonist (e.g. clopidogrel or ticagrelor) and aspirin for up to one year and aspirin indefinitely.

Aspirin

acetylsalicylic acidASAbaby aspirin
Since platelets are involved in the clotting process, patients must take dual antiplatelet therapy starting immediately before or after stenting: usually an ADP receptor antagonist (e.g. clopidogrel or ticagrelor) and aspirin for up to one year and aspirin indefinitely.

Thrombosis

blood clotsthromboticblood clot
However, in some cases the dual antiplatelet therapy may be insufficient to fully prevent clots that may result in stent thrombosis; these clots and cell proliferation may sometimes cause standard (“bare-metal”) stents to become blocked (restenosis).

Restenosis

coronary restenosisre-stenosisrestenotic
However, in some cases the dual antiplatelet therapy may be insufficient to fully prevent clots that may result in stent thrombosis; these clots and cell proliferation may sometimes cause standard (“bare-metal”) stents to become blocked (restenosis).

Immunosuppressive drug

immunosuppressantcalcineurin inhibitorimmunosuppressive drugs
Drug-eluting stents were developed with the intent of dealing with this problem: by releasing an antiproliferative drug (drugs typically used against cancer or as immunosuppressants), they can help reduce the incidence of "in-stent restenosis" (re-narrowing).

Smooth muscle

smooth muscle cellssmooth musclessmooth muscle cell
One of the drawbacks of vascular stents is the potential for restenosis via the development of a thick smooth muscle tissue inside the lumen, the so-called neointima.