Coronation of Elizabeth II

Coronation of Queen Elizabeth IIcoronationher coronationQueen Elizabeth II's coronation1953 Coronationthe coronationQueen's CoronationElizabeth II's coronationCoronation Daycoronation in 1953
The coronation of Elizabeth II took place on 2 June 1953 at Westminster Abbey, London.wikipedia
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Coronation of the British monarch

coronationcrownedcoronations
The coronation was held more than one year later because of the tradition of allowing an appropriate length of time to pass after a monarch dies before holding such festivals.
For example, Queen Elizabeth II was crowned on 2 June 1953, having ascended the throne on 6 February 1952; the date of her coronation was announced almost a year in advance, and preparations inside the abbey took five months.

Queen Elizabeth II Coronation Medal

Coronation MedalQueen's Coronation MedalCoronation Medal 1953
Celebrations took place across the Commonwealth realms and a commemorative medal was issued.
The Queen Elizabeth II Coronation Medal is a commemorative medal instituted to celebrate the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II on 2 June 1953.

Elizabeth II

Queen Elizabeth IIthe QueenQueen
Elizabeth II ascended the throne at the age of 25 upon the death of her father, George VI, on 6 February 1952, being proclaimed queen by her privy and executive councils shortly afterwards.
Significant events have included her coronation in 1953 and the celebrations of her Silver, Golden, and Diamond Jubilees in 1977, 2002, and 2012, respectively.

Coronation gown of Elizabeth II

Coronation gown of Queen Elizabeth IIElizabeth's coronation gown1953 Coronation Dress
Norman Hartnell was commissioned by the Queen to design the outfits for all members of the royal family, including Elizabeth's coronation gown.
Queen Elizabeth II's coronation took place on 2 June 1953.

David Eccles, 1st Viscount Eccles

David EcclesSir David EcclesThe Viscount Eccles
Many physical preparations and decorations along the route were the responsibility of David Eccles, Minister of Works.
He served in the Conservative administrations of Churchill, Eden and Macmillan respectively as Minister of Works from 1951 to 1954 (in which position he helped organise the 1953 Coronation and was appointed KCVO), as Minister of Education from 1954 to 1957 and again from 1959 to 1962 and as President of the Board of Trade from 1957 to 1959.

Lavinia Fitzalan-Howard, Duchess of Norfolk

Duchess of NorfolkLavinia Mary StruttLavinia, Duchess of Norfolk
The Duchess of Norfolk usually stood in for the Queen at rehearsals.
In 1953, she took the part of Queen Elizabeth II during dress rehearsals for the Coronation at Westminster Abbey.

Lady Rosemary Spencer-Churchill

Lady Rosemary Mildred Spencer-ChurchillLady Rosemary Muir
Attached to the shoulders of her dress, the Queen wore the Robe of State, a 6-yard (5.5 metre) long, hand woven silk velvet cloak lined with Canadian ermine that required the assistance of the Queen's maids of honour—Lady Jane Vane-Tempest-Stewart, Lady Anne Coke, Lady Moyra Hamilton, Lady Mary Baillie-Hamilton, Lady Jane Heathcote-Drummond-Willoughby, Lady Rosemary Spencer-Churchill and the Duchess of Devonshire —to carry.
Lady Rosemary Mildred Muir (née Spencer-Churchill; born 24 July 1929) is an English aristocrat who served as a maid of honour to Elizabeth II at her coronation in 1953.

Dominion of Pakistan

PakistanQueen of PakistanKing of Pakistan
During the service, Elizabeth took an oath, was anointed with holy oil, invested with robes and regalia, and crowned Queen of the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Pakistan, and Ceylon (now Sri Lanka).
During the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953, she was crowned as Queen of seven independent Commonwealth countries, including Pakistan, which was still a dominion at the time, whereas India was not, as the dominion of India had become a republic under the new Indian constitution of 1950.

KVOS-TV

KVOSKVOS 12KVOS-DT2
The film was escorted by the RCMP to the Peace Arch Border Crossing, where it was then escorted by the Washington State Patrol to Bellingham, where it was shown as the inaugural broadcast of KVOS-TV, a new station whose signal reached into the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, allowing viewers there to see the coronation as well, though on a one day delay.
Its first broadcast was a kinescope of Queen Elizabeth II's coronation.

Coronation Day

Coronation
After being closed since the Queen's accession for coronation preparations, Westminster Abbey was opened at 6 am on Coronation Day to the approximately 8,000 guests invited from across the Commonwealth of Nations; more prominent individuals, such as members of the Queen's family and foreign royalty, the peers of the United Kingdom, heads of state, Members of Parliament from the Queen's various legislatures, and the like, arrived after 8:30 a.m. Tonga's Queen Sālote was a guest, and was noted for her cheery demeanour while riding in an open carriage through London in the rain.

Andrew Cunningham, 1st Viscount Cunningham of Hyndhope

Andrew CunninghamSir Andrew CunninghamAndrew Browne Cunningham
Preceding the Queen into Westminster Abbey was St Edward's Crown, carried into the abbey by the Lord High Steward of England, then the Viscount Cunningham of Hyndhope, who was flanked by two other peers, while the Archbishops and Bishops Assistant (Durham and Bath and Wells) of the Church of England, in their copes and mitres, waited outside the Great West Door for the arrival of the Queen.
After his retirement, Cunningham enjoyed several ceremonial positions, including Lord High Steward at the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953.

Mary of Teck

Queen MaryMaryDuchess of York
Elizabeth's grandmother Queen Mary had died on 24 March 1953, having stated in her will that her death should not affect the planning of the coronation, and the event went ahead as scheduled.
Mary died on 24 March 1953 in her sleep at the age of 85, ten weeks before her granddaughter's coronation.

Coronation of George VI and Elizabeth

coronation of King George VI and Queen Elizabethcoronation of George VIcoronation of King George VI
It was the first British coronation to be televised; television cameras had not been allowed inside the abbey during her father's coronation in 1937.
It has been somewhat overshadowed in history by the larger Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953; the Abbey's sacrist, Jocelyn Perkins, said that the 1953 event was "out and away the most impressive" of the 1953, 1937 and 1911 coronations.

Alan Brooke, 1st Viscount Alanbrooke

Alan BrookeSir Alan BrookeAlanbrooke
After the Queen moved to stand before King Edward's Chair (Coronation Chair), she turned, following as Fisher, along with the Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain (the Viscount Simonds), Lord Great Chamberlain of England (the Marquess of Cholmondeley), Lord High Constable of England (the Viscount Alanbrooke) and Earl Marshal of the United Kingdom (the Duke of Norfolk), all led by the Garter Principal King of Arms (George Bellew), asked the audience in each direction of the compass separately: "Sirs, I here present unto you Queen Elizabeth, your undoubted Queen: wherefore all you who are come this day to do your homage and service, are you willing to do the same?"
After retiring from the British Army, he served as Lord High Constable of England during the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953.

Imperial State Crown

Imperial Crownimperial crowns
She also wore the Imperial State Crown while going about her daily business – at her desk, during tea, and while reading a newspaper – so that she could become accustomed to its feel and weight.
The crown was adjusted for Queen Elizabeth II's coronation in 1953, with the head size reduced and the arches lowered by 25 mm (1 inch) to give it a more feminine appearance.

Winston Churchill

Sir Winston ChurchillChurchillChurchill, Winston
There had been considerable debate within the British Cabinet on the subject, with Prime Minister Winston Churchill against the idea; but, Elizabeth refused his advice on this matter and insisted the event take place before television cameras, as well as those filming with experimental 3D technology.
Some of Churchill's colleagues hoped that he might retire after the Queen's Coronation in May 1953.

Maid of honour

maids of honourhovfrökenmaid-of-honour
Attached to the shoulders of her dress, the Queen wore the Robe of State, a 6-yard (5.5 metre) long, hand woven silk velvet cloak lined with Canadian ermine that required the assistance of the Queen's maids of honour—Lady Jane Vane-Tempest-Stewart, Lady Anne Coke, Lady Moyra Hamilton, Lady Mary Baillie-Hamilton, Lady Jane Heathcote-Drummond-Willoughby, Lady Rosemary Spencer-Churchill and the Duchess of Devonshire —to carry.
At her coronation, Queen Elizabeth II had maids of honour who attended to her throughout the ceremony, especially carrying the trains of her robes.

Bernard Fitzalan-Howard, 16th Duke of Norfolk

Duke of NorfolkThe Duke of NorfolkBernard Marmaduke Fitzalan-Howard, 16th Duke of Norfolk
After the Queen moved to stand before King Edward's Chair (Coronation Chair), she turned, following as Fisher, along with the Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain (the Viscount Simonds), Lord Great Chamberlain of England (the Marquess of Cholmondeley), Lord High Constable of England (the Viscount Alanbrooke) and Earl Marshal of the United Kingdom (the Duke of Norfolk), all led by the Garter Principal King of Arms (George Bellew), asked the audience in each direction of the compass separately: "Sirs, I here present unto you Queen Elizabeth, your undoubted Queen: wherefore all you who are come this day to do your homage and service, are you willing to do the same?" Other committees were also formed, such as the Coronation Joint Committee and the Coronation Executive Committee, both chaired by the Duke of Norfolk who, by convention as Earl Marshal, had overall responsibility for the event.
As hereditary Earl Marshal, he organised the coronation of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, the funeral of Winston Churchill, and the investiture of Prince Charles as Prince of Wales.

George Bellew

George Rothe BellewHon. Sir George Rothe BellewSir George Bellew
After the Queen moved to stand before King Edward's Chair (Coronation Chair), she turned, following as Fisher, along with the Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain (the Viscount Simonds), Lord Great Chamberlain of England (the Marquess of Cholmondeley), Lord High Constable of England (the Viscount Alanbrooke) and Earl Marshal of the United Kingdom (the Duke of Norfolk), all led by the Garter Principal King of Arms (George Bellew), asked the audience in each direction of the compass separately: "Sirs, I here present unto you Queen Elizabeth, your undoubted Queen: wherefore all you who are come this day to do your homage and service, are you willing to do the same?"
As Garter, Bellew oversaw the funeral of George VI, proclaimed the late King's daughter, Elizabeth II, as Queen and took a leading role in the organisation of her Coronation in 1953.

I was glad

Laetatus SumacclamationI rejoiced
Once going, the procession, which included the various High Commissioners of the Commonwealth carrying banners bearing the shields of the coats of arms of their respective nations, moved inside the abbey, up the central aisle and through the choir to the stage, as the choirs sang "I was glad", an imperial setting of Psalm 122, vv.
At the last coronation, that of Elizabeth II in 1953, the acclamation took the form of "Vivat Regina Elizabetha".

William McKie (musician)

William McKieSir William McKieWilliam Neil McKie
Although many had assumed that the Master of the Queen's Musick, Arnold Bax, would be the director of music for the coronation, it was decided instead to appoint the organist and master of the choristers at the abbey, William McKie, who had been in charge of music at the royal wedding in 1947.
He was Organist and Master of the Choristers at Westminster Abbey 1941-1963 and noted for his direction of the music for the marriage of Princess Elizabeth in 1947, and later her Coronation in 1953.

George Marshall

George C. MarshallMarshallGeneral George C. Marshall
General George Marshall, the United States Secretary of State who implemented the Marshall Plan, was appointed chairman of the US delegation to the coronation and attended the ceremony along with his wife, Katherine.
He was head of the American delegation at the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953.

Sālote Tupou III

Salote Tupou IIIQueen SaloteSālote
After being closed since the Queen's accession for coronation preparations, Westminster Abbey was opened at 6 am on Coronation Day to the approximately 8,000 guests invited from across the Commonwealth of Nations; more prominent individuals, such as members of the Queen's family and foreign royalty, the peers of the United Kingdom, heads of state, Members of Parliament from the Queen's various legislatures, and the like, arrived after 8:30 a.m. Tonga's Queen Sālote was a guest, and was noted for her cheery demeanour while riding in an open carriage through London in the rain. Behind the marching troops was a carriage procession led by the rulers of the British protectorates, including the Queen of Tonga, the Commonwealth prime ministers, the princes and princesses of the blood royal, and the Queen Mother.
She brought Tonga to international attention when, during her sole visit to Europe, she attended the 1953 coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in London.

Gold State Coach

British Coronation Coachgilded state coachRoyal State Coach
Queen Elizabeth II proceeded through London from Buckingham Palace, through Trafalgar Square, and towards the abbey in the Gold State Coach.
The Gold State Coach has been used since the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II.

Colin Tennant, 3rd Baron Glenconner

Colin TennantLord GlenconnerColin Christopher Paget Tennant
Attached to the shoulders of her dress, the Queen wore the Robe of State, a 6-yard (5.5 metre) long, hand woven silk velvet cloak lined with Canadian ermine that required the assistance of the Queen's maids of honour—Lady Jane Vane-Tempest-Stewart, Lady Anne Coke, Lady Moyra Hamilton, Lady Mary Baillie-Hamilton, Lady Jane Heathcote-Drummond-Willoughby, Lady Rosemary Spencer-Churchill and the Duchess of Devonshire —to carry.
Lady Anne had been one of Queen Elizabeth II's Maids of Honour at the 1953 coronation, and was also a close friend and lady-in-waiting of the Queen's sister, Princess Margaret.