Corporate branding

corporate brandbranding
Corporate branding refers to the practice of promoting the brand name of a corporate entity, as opposed to specific products or services.wikipedia
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Brand architecture

sub-brand
The ways in which corporate brands and other brands interact is known as the corporate brand architecture.
The brand architecture should define the different leagues of branding within the organization; how the corporate brand and sub-brands relate to and support each other; and how the sub-brands reflect or reinforce the core purpose of the corporate brand to which they belong.

Individual branding

flanker brandIndividual product brandindividual product brands
Individual branding contrasts with umbrella branding (or umbrella branding) and corporate branding, in which the firm markets all of its product together, using the same brand name and identity.

Brand

brand namemarquebrands
Corporate branding refers to the practice of promoting the brand name of a corporate entity, as opposed to specific products or services.

Corporation

corporatecorporationsincorporated
Although corporate branding is a distinct activity from product or service branding, these different forms of branding can, and often do, take place side-by-side within a given corporation.

Economies of scope

scopeEconomy of scopeScope economies
It therefore can result in significant economies of scope since one advertising campaign can be used for several products.

Advertising

advertisementadvertisementscommercial
It therefore can result in significant economies of scope since one advertising campaign can be used for several products. These touchpoints include; logo, customer service, treatment and training of employees, packaging, advertising, stationery, and quality of products and services.

New product development

product developmentdevelopmentdeveloping
It also facilitates new product acceptance because potential buyers are already familiar with the name.

Positioning (marketing)

positioningmarket positionproduct positioning
However, this strategy may hinder the creation of distinct brand images or identities for different products: an overarching corporate brand reduces the ability to position a brand with an individual identity, and may conceal different products' unique characteristics.

Touchpoint

touch pointmarketing touch points
Branding can incorporate multiple touchpoints.

Logo

logotypecorporate logologo design
These touchpoints include; logo, customer service, treatment and training of employees, packaging, advertising, stationery, and quality of products and services.

Customer service

customer careservicecustomer feedback
These touchpoints include; logo, customer service, treatment and training of employees, packaging, advertising, stationery, and quality of products and services.

Stationery

stationerschool suppliesstationers
These touchpoints include; logo, customer service, treatment and training of employees, packaging, advertising, stationery, and quality of products and services.

Organizational culture

corporate culturecompany cultureculture
It has been argued that successful corporate branding often stems from a strong coherence between what the company's top management seek to accomplish (their strategic vision), what the company's employees know and believe (lodged in its organizational culture), and how its external stakeholders perceived the company (their image of it).

Marketing

marketermarketedmarketing campaign
Changes in stakeholder expectations are causing an increasing number of corporations to integrate marketing, communications and corporate social responsibility into corporate branding.

Communication

communicationsSocial Communicationcommunicate
Changes in stakeholder expectations are causing an increasing number of corporations to integrate marketing, communications and corporate social responsibility into corporate branding.

IBM

International Business MachinesIBM CorporationInternational Business Machines Corporation
This trend is evident in campaigns such as IBM Smarter Planet, G.E. Ecomagination, The Coca-Cola Company Live Positively, and DOW Human Element.

General Electric

GEGeneral Electric CompanyGeneral Electric Co.
This trend is evident in campaigns such as IBM Smarter Planet, G.E. Ecomagination, The Coca-Cola Company Live Positively, and DOW Human Element.

The Coca-Cola Company

Coca-ColaCoca-Cola CompanyCoca Cola Company
This trend is evident in campaigns such as IBM Smarter Planet, G.E. Ecomagination, The Coca-Cola Company Live Positively, and DOW Human Element.

Dow Chemical Company

Dow ChemicalDowThe Dow Chemical Company
This trend is evident in campaigns such as IBM Smarter Planet, G.E. Ecomagination, The Coca-Cola Company Live Positively, and DOW Human Element.

Digital Revolution

computer revolutioncomputerizationThird Industrial Revolution
Transparency is, in part, a byproduct of the digital revolution, which has enabled stakeholders—employees, retirees, customers, business partners, supply chain partners, investors, neighbors—with the ability to share opinion about corporations via social media.

Social media

socialsocial media platformsocial media campaign
Transparency is, in part, a byproduct of the digital revolution, which has enabled stakeholders—employees, retirees, customers, business partners, supply chain partners, investors, neighbors—with the ability to share opinion about corporations via social media.

Corporate social responsibility

CSRcorporate responsibilitycorporate citizenship
Changes in stakeholder expectations are causing an increasing number of corporations to integrate marketing, communications and corporate social responsibility into corporate branding.