Corporation sole

the Crowncorporations solesole ownershipthe Crown never dies
A corporation sole is a legal entity consisting of a single ("sole") incorporated office, occupied by a single ("sole") natural person.wikipedia
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Legal person

legal personalitylegal entitybody corporate
A corporation sole is a legal entity consisting of a single ("sole") incorporated office, occupied by a single ("sole") natural person.
In some common law jurisdictions a distinction is drawn between corporation aggregate (such as a company, which is composed of a number of members) and a corporation sole, which is a public office of legal personality separated from the individual holding the office; (both entities have separate legal personality).

Corporation

corporatecorporationsincorporated
A corporation sole is one of two types of corporation, the other being a corporation aggregate.
Corporations can be divided by the number of owners: corporation aggregate or corporation sole.

The Crown

British CrownCrownAustralian Crown
Within most constitutional monarchies, notably the Commonwealth realms, the Crown is a non-statutory corporation sole.
A corporation sole, the Crown is the legal embodiment of executive, legislative, and judicial governance in the monarchy of each country.

Iglesia ni Cristo

Iglesia ni KristoAng Iglesia ni CristoIglesia Ni Cristo - Murphy Locale
Iglesia ni Cristo was registered as corporation sole with the Insular Government in the Philippines in 1914.
He later registered his new-found religion as the Iglesia Ni Cristo (English: Church of Christ; Spanish: Iglesia de Cristo) on July 27, 1914, at the Bureau of Commerce as a corporation sole, with himself as the first executive minister.

Monarchy of Canada

Queen of CanadaCanadian monarchCanadian Royal Family
For example, Elizabeth II as a natural person holds several separate offices, such as Queen of the United Kingdom, Queen of Canada, Queen of Australia, Supreme Governor of the Church of England, etc. which are all distinct corporations sole, and at the same time she may also act as a natural person in a private capacity separate and apart from her role filling these various offices (corporations).
This is because, in common law, the Crown never dies.

Religious corporation

Religious non-profit organizationreligious-corporation
This allows corporations (often religious corporations or Commonwealth governments) to pass without interval in time from one office holder to the next successor-in-office, giving the positions legal continuity with subsequent office holders having identical powers and possessions to their predecessors.
Religious corporations are permitted to designate a person to act in the capacity of corporation sole.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

LDS ChurchLatter-day SaintChurch of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints also uses the corporation sole form for its president, which is legally listed as "The Corporation of the President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints".
a corporation sole which was organized in 1916 under the laws of the state of Utah to acquire, hold, and dispose of real property; the Corporation of the President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which was established in 1923 in Utah to receive and manage money and church donations; and Intellectual Reserve, Inc., which was incorporated in 1997 to hold the church's copyrights, trademarks, and other intellectual property.

Government Legal Department

Treasury SolicitorHM Procurator General and Treasury SolicitorTreasury Solicitor's Department
The office was enshrined in law by the Treasury Solicitor Act 1876, which established the Treasury Solicitor as a corporation sole (an office with perpetual succession).

Receiver of the Metropolitan Police

ReceiverReceiver for the Metropolitan Police DistrictMetropolitan Police Receiver
All the property of the Metropolitan Police was technically owned by the holder of the post of Receiver, who had the legal status of a corporation sole.

Public Trust

Public TrusteeNew Zealand Public TrusteeNew Zealand Public Trust
The Public Trust of New Zealand was a government-appointed corporation sole providing trustee services to those unwilling to use private services, or required by the courts or legislation to use the Public Trustee.

Da'i al-Mutlaq

Dāʿī al-MuṭlaqDa'iDai al-Mutlaq
The Dā'ī al-Mutlaq is recognised in English law as a corporation sole, by a private act of Parliament passed in 1993.

Director of National Parks

Parks AustraliaAustralian Nature Conservation AgencyAustralian National Parks and Wildlife Service
The agency is a corporation sole and its work is supported by Parks Australia, a division of the Department of the Environment and Energy.

Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner

Immigration Services CommissionerOISCImmigration Services
The posts of Immigration Services Commissioner and Deputy Immigration Services Commissioner are Ministerial appointments, and the Commissioner is a corporation sole.

Commonwealth

British CommonwealthCommonwealth of NationsCommonwealth citizens
This allows corporations (often religious corporations or Commonwealth governments) to pass without interval in time from one office holder to the next successor-in-office, giving the positions legal continuity with subsequent office holders having identical powers and possessions to their predecessors.

Archbishop of Canterbury

Archbishops of CanterburyCanterburysee of Canterbury
Most corporations sole are church-related (for example, the Archbishop of Canterbury ), but some political offices of the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States are also corporations sole.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
In the United Kingdom, for example, many of the Secretaries of State are corporations sole.

Secretary of State (United Kingdom)

Secretary of StateSecretaries of StateBritish Secretary of State
In the United Kingdom, for example, many of the Secretaries of State are corporations sole.

Religious denomination

denominationdenominationaldenominations
The concept of corporation sole originated as a means for orderly transfer of ecclesiastical property, serving to keep the title within the denomination or religious society.

Vicar

incumbenciesvicariateparochial vicar
In order to keep the religious property from being treated as the estate of the vicar of the church, the property was titled to the office of the corporation sole.

Catholic Church

Roman CatholicCatholicRoman Catholic Church
In the case of the Roman Catholic Church, ecclesiastical property is usually titled to the diocesan bishop, who serves in the office of the corporation sole.

Diocesan bishop

Bishopdiocesanbishop diocesan
In the case of the Roman Catholic Church, ecclesiastical property is usually titled to the diocesan bishop, who serves in the office of the corporation sole.

Diocese

bishopricarchdiocesediocesan
The Roman Catholic Church continues to use corporations sole in holding titles of property: as recently as 2002, it split a diocese in the US state of California into many smaller corporations sole and with each parish priest becoming his own corporation sole, thus limiting the diocese's liability for any sexual abuse or other wrongful activity in which the priest might engage.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
The Roman Catholic Church continues to use corporations sole in holding titles of property: as recently as 2002, it split a diocese in the US state of California into many smaller corporations sole and with each parish priest becoming his own corporation sole, thus limiting the diocese's liability for any sexual abuse or other wrongful activity in which the priest might engage.

List of states and territories of the United States

State50 states50 United States
The Roman Catholic Church continues to use corporations sole in holding titles of property: as recently as 2002, it split a diocese in the US state of California into many smaller corporations sole and with each parish priest becoming his own corporation sole, thus limiting the diocese's liability for any sexual abuse or other wrongful activity in which the priest might engage.

California

CAState of CaliforniaCalifornia, USA
The Roman Catholic Church continues to use corporations sole in holding titles of property: as recently as 2002, it split a diocese in the US state of California into many smaller corporations sole and with each parish priest becoming his own corporation sole, thus limiting the diocese's liability for any sexual abuse or other wrongful activity in which the priest might engage.