Cotton

cotton woolcotton industrycotton fibercotton clothcotton farmingcotton linterbollscotton growingcotton merchantlisle
Cotton is a soft, fluffy staple fiber that grows in a boll, or protective case, around the seeds of the cotton plants of the genus Gossypium in the mallow family Malvaceae.wikipedia
4,353 Related Articles

Malvaceae

mallow familymallowmallows
Cotton is a soft, fluffy staple fiber that grows in a boll, or protective case, around the seeds of the cotton plants of the genus Gossypium in the mallow family Malvaceae.
Well-known members of economic importance include okra, cotton, cacao and durian.

Gossypium

cottoncotton plantlint
Cotton is a soft, fluffy staple fiber that grows in a boll, or protective case, around the seeds of the cotton plants of the genus Gossypium in the mallow family Malvaceae.
Gossypium is a genus of flowering plants in the tribe Gossypieae of the mallow family, Malvaceae from which cotton is harvested.

Textile

textilesfabriccloth
The fiber is most often spun into yarn or thread and used to make a soft, breathable textile.
Yarn is produced by spinning raw fibres of wool, flax, cotton, hemp, or other materials to produce long strands.

Cotton gin

ginninggincotton ginning
Although cultivated since antiquity, it was the invention of the cotton gin that lowered the cost of production that led to its widespread use, and it is the most widely used natural fiber cloth in clothing today.
A cotton gin – meaning "cotton engine" – is a machine that quickly and easily separates cotton fibers from their seeds, enabling much greater productivity than manual cotton separation.

Cellulose

cellulolyticcellulosiccellulose ester
The fiber is almost pure cellulose.
The cellulose content of cotton fiber is 90%, that of wood is 40–50%, and that of dried hemp is approximately 57%.

Fiber

fibrefibersfibrous
Cotton is a soft, fluffy staple fiber that grows in a boll, or protective case, around the seeds of the cotton plants of the genus Gossypium in the mallow family Malvaceae.
Natural cellulose, such as cotton or bleached kraft, show smaller fibrils jutting out and away from the main fiber structure.

Yarn

threadcotton yarnyarns
The fiber is most often spun into yarn or thread and used to make a soft, breathable textile.
The most common plant fiber is cotton, which is typically spun into fine yarn for mechanical weaving or knitting into cloth.

Spinning (textiles)

spinningcotton spinningspun
The fiber is most often spun into yarn or thread and used to make a soft, breathable textile.
Natural fibres are from animals (sheep, goat, rabbit, silkworm), minerals (asbestos), or plants (cotton, flax, sisal).

Muslin

mousselineSindonDhakai muslin
The largest manufacturing industry in the Mughal Empire was cotton textile manufacturing, which included the production of piece goods, calicos, and muslins, available unbleached and in a variety of colours.
Muslin ( or ), also mousseline or Malmal, is a cotton fabric of plain weave.

Textile industry

textiletextilestextile manufacturer
The cotton textile industry was responsible for a large part of the empire's international trade.
Natural fibres are either from animals (sheep, goat, rabbit, silk-worm) mineral (asbestos) or from plants (cotton, flax, sisal).

Textile manufacturing

textile millTextile Engineeringtextile mills
The largest manufacturing industry in the Mughal Empire was cotton textile manufacturing, which included the production of piece goods, calicos, and muslins, available unbleached and in a variety of colours.
Cotton remains the most important natural fibre, so is treated in depth.

Spinning wheel

charkhacharkawheel
The earliest clear illustrations of the spinning wheel come from the Islamic world in the eleventh century.
However, it fell into disuse when fibre production shifted from hemp to cotton.

Bengal Subah

Mughal BengalBengalMughal
The most important center of cotton production was the Bengal Subah province, particularly around its capital city of Dhaka.
The eastern part of Bengal was globally prominent in industries such as textile manufacturing and shipbuilding, and it was a major exporter of silk and cotton textiles, steel, saltpeter, and agricultural and industrial produce in the world.

East India Company

British East India CompanyHonourable East India CompanyEnglish East India Company
The English East India Company (EIC) introduced the Britain to cheap calico and chintz cloth on the restoration of the monarchy in the 1660s.
Originally chartered as the "Governor and Company of Merchants of London Trading into the East-Indies", the company rose to account for half of the world's trade, particularly in basic commodities including cotton, silk, indigo dye, salt, spices, saltpetre, tea, and opium.

Cotton mill

cotton spinning millcotton millsmill
This mechanised production was concentrated in new cotton mills, which slowly expanded till by the beginning of the 1770s seven thousand bales of cotton were imported annually, and pressure was put on Parliament, by the new mill owners, to remove the prohibition on the production and sale of pure cotton cloth, as they could easily compete with anything the EIC could import.
A cotton mill is a building housing spinning or weaving machinery for the production of yarn or cloth from cotton, an important product during the Industrial Revolution in the development of the factory system.

Boll

Boll (disambiguation)
Cotton is a soft, fluffy staple fiber that grows in a boll, or protective case, around the seeds of the cotton plants of the genus Gossypium in the mallow family Malvaceae.

Calico

calico printingcalico printercalicoes
The largest manufacturing industry in the Mughal Empire was cotton textile manufacturing, which included the production of piece goods, calicos, and muslins, available unbleached and in a variety of colours. The English East India Company (EIC) introduced the Britain to cheap calico and chintz cloth on the restoration of the monarchy in the 1660s.
Calico (in British usage since 1505) is a plain-woven textile made from unbleached and often not fully processed cotton.

Vegetable Lamb of Tartary

BarometzTartar LambVegetable Lamb
(See Vegetable Lamb of Tartary.)
Underlying the legend is the cotton plant, which was unknown in Northern Europe before the Norman conquest of Sicily.

Dhaka

DaccaDhaka, BangladeshDhaka City
The most important center of cotton production was the Bengal Subah province, particularly around its capital city of Dhaka.
The city was a center of the worldwide muslin, cotton and jute industries, with 80,000 skilled weavers.

Fustian

bombastclothfustanum
In 1721, dissatisfied with the results of the first act, Parliament passed a stricter addition, this time prohibiting the sale of most cottons, imported and domestic (exempting only thread Fustian and raw cotton).
Fustian is a variety of heavy cloth woven from cotton, chiefly prepared for menswear.

Egypt

EgyptianEGYArab Republic of Egypt
Egyptians grew and spun cotton in the first seven centuries of the Christian era.
The introduction in 1820 of long-staple cotton transformed its agriculture into a cash-crop monoculture before the end of the century, concentrating land ownership and shifting production towards international markets.

Spinning mule

mule spindlesmule spinningmule
Later, the invention of the James Hargreaves' spinning jenny in 1764, Richard Arkwright's spinning frame in 1769 and Samuel Crompton's spinning mule in 1775 enabled British spinners to produce cotton yarn at much higher rates.
The spinning mule is a machine used to spin cotton and other fibres.

Plantation

plantationscotton plantationsugar plantation
Improving technology and increasing control of world markets allowed British traders to develop a commercial chain in which raw cotton fibers were (at first) purchased from colonial plantations, processed into cotton cloth in the mills of Lancashire, and then exported on British ships to captive colonial markets in West Africa, India, and China (via Shanghai and Hong Kong).
The crops that are grown include cotton,

Spindle (textiles)

spindlespindlesspindle whorls
Egypt under Muhammad Ali in the early 19th century had the fifth most productive cotton industry in the world, in terms of the number of spindles per capita.
A spindle is a straight spike usually made from wood used for spinning, twisting fibers such as wool, flax, hemp, cotton into yarn.

Staple (textiles)

stapleStaple fiberfilament
Cotton is a soft, fluffy staple fiber that grows in a boll, or protective case, around the seeds of the cotton plants of the genus Gossypium in the mallow family Malvaceae.
Natural fibres (such as cotton or wool) have a range of lengths in each sample, so the staple length is an average.