Counsel

legal counseladvisorSpecial CounselChief Counselcity attorneyCouncilCouncillorcounselorcounselslawyer
A counsel or a counsellor at law is a person who gives advice and deals with various issues, particularly in legal matters.wikipedia
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Lawyer

attorneylawyersattorneys
It is a title often used interchangeably with the title of lawyer. In the United States of America, the term counselor-at-law designates, specifically, an attorney admitted to practice in all courts of law; but as the United States legal system makes no formal division of the legal profession into two classes, as in the United Kingdom, most US citizens use the term loosely in the same sense as lawyer, meaning one who is versed in (or practicing) law.
A lawyer or attorney is a person who practices law, as an advocate, attorney, attorney at law, barrister, barrister-at-law, bar-at-law, canonist, canon lawyer, civil law notary, counsel, counselor, counsellor, solicitor, legal executive, or public servant preparing, interpreting and applying law, but not as a paralegal or charter executive secretary.

Law

legallawslegal theory
A counsel or a counsellor at law is a person who gives advice and deals with various issues, particularly in legal matters. In the United States of America, the term counselor-at-law designates, specifically, an attorney admitted to practice in all courts of law; but as the United States legal system makes no formal division of the legal profession into two classes, as in the United Kingdom, most US citizens use the term loosely in the same sense as lawyer, meaning one who is versed in (or practicing) law.
Once accredited, a lawyer will often work in a law firm, in a chambers as a sole practitioner, in a government post or in a private corporation as an internal counsel.

Of counsel

assigned counselcounselGeneral Counsel
In the United States and Canada, many large and midsize law firms have lawyers with the job title of "counsel", "special counsel" or "of counsel".

Barristers in England and Wales

English BarbarristerBar of England and Wales
The legal system in England uses the term counsel as an approximate synonym for a barrister-at-law, but not for a solicitor, and may apply it to mean either a single person who pleads a cause, or collectively, the body of barristers engaged in a case.

Solicitor

solicitorsSolicitor GeneralSolicitor-General
The legal system in England uses the term counsel as an approximate synonym for a barrister-at-law, but not for a solicitor, and may apply it to mean either a single person who pleads a cause, or collectively, the body of barristers engaged in a case.

Pleading

pleadpleadingspleaded
The legal system in England uses the term counsel as an approximate synonym for a barrister-at-law, but not for a solicitor, and may apply it to mean either a single person who pleads a cause, or collectively, the body of barristers engaged in a case.

Barrister

Barrister-at-Lawbarristersbar
The legal system in England uses the term counsel as an approximate synonym for a barrister-at-law, but not for a solicitor, and may apply it to mean either a single person who pleads a cause, or collectively, the body of barristers engaged in a case.

Legal case

casecourt casecases
The legal system in England uses the term counsel as an approximate synonym for a barrister-at-law, but not for a solicitor, and may apply it to mean either a single person who pleads a cause, or collectively, the body of barristers engaged in a case.

Inns of Court

Inn of CourtInnInns
"Barrister" is a professional title awarded by one of the four Inns of Court, and is used in a barrister's private, academic or professional capacity.

Ireland

IrishIRLisland of Ireland
The legal term counsellor, or more fully, counsellor-at-law, became practically obsolete in England, but continued in use locally in Ireland as an equivalent to barrister, where a Senior Counsel (S.C.) is equivalent to the English Queen's Counsel (Q.C.)

Queen's Counsel

QCKing's CounselKC
The legal term counsellor, or more fully, counsellor-at-law, became practically obsolete in England, but continued in use locally in Ireland as an equivalent to barrister, where a Senior Counsel (S.C.) is equivalent to the English Queen's Counsel (Q.C.)

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
In the United States of America, the term counselor-at-law designates, specifically, an attorney admitted to practice in all courts of law; but as the United States legal system makes no formal division of the legal profession into two classes, as in the United Kingdom, most US citizens use the term loosely in the same sense as lawyer, meaning one who is versed in (or practicing) law.

Attorneys in the United States

attorneylawyerattorneys
In the United States of America, the term counselor-at-law designates, specifically, an attorney admitted to practice in all courts of law; but as the United States legal system makes no formal division of the legal profession into two classes, as in the United Kingdom, most US citizens use the term loosely in the same sense as lawyer, meaning one who is versed in (or practicing) law.

Court

court of lawcourtscourts of law
In the United States of America, the term counselor-at-law designates, specifically, an attorney admitted to practice in all courts of law; but as the United States legal system makes no formal division of the legal profession into two classes, as in the United Kingdom, most US citizens use the term loosely in the same sense as lawyer, meaning one who is versed in (or practicing) law.

Legal profession

Lawlegal professionalLegal
In the United States of America, the term counselor-at-law designates, specifically, an attorney admitted to practice in all courts of law; but as the United States legal system makes no formal division of the legal profession into two classes, as in the United Kingdom, most US citizens use the term loosely in the same sense as lawyer, meaning one who is versed in (or practicing) law.

Canada

CanadianCANCanadians
In the United States and Canada, many large and midsize law firms have lawyers with the job title of "counsel", "special counsel" or "of counsel".

Law firm

law firmsfirmlaw office
(For more information, see the Law firm article.)

Stephen M. Schwebel

Stephen SchwebelJudge Stephen M. SchwebelSchwebel
Stephen Myron Schwebel (born March 10, 1929), is an American jurist, counsel and independent arbitrator.

Rede

Rede (disambiguation)
Rede is an archaic word meaning, among other things, "counsel" and "advice".

Alfred (name)

AlfredAlfie/AlfredAlfréd
Alfred is a masculine given name of English origin, a modern descendant of the Anglo-Saxon name Ælfræd, formed from the Germanic words ælf, meaning elf, and ræd, meaning counsel.

Dale Bumpers

Dale L. BumpersDale Leon Bumpers
Prior to his death, he was counsel at the Washington, D.C. office of law firm Arent Fox LLP, where his clients included Riceland Foods and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.

Murder of Sylvia Likens

Sylvia LikensGertrude Baniszewskibook of the same name
Baniszewski; her oldest daughter, Paula; her son, John; and two neighborhood youths, Coy Hubbard and Richard Hobbs, were all tried and convicted in May 1966 of neglecting, torturing, and murdering Likens, with counsels at the defendants' trial describing the case as the "most diabolical" ever to be presented before a court or jury and Likens having been subjected to acts of "degradation that you wouldn't commit on a dog" prior to her death.

Closing argument

SummationClosingClosing (law)
A closing argument, summation, or summing up is the concluding statement of each party's counsel reiterating the important arguments for the trier of fact, often the jury, in a court case.