Count Basie

BasieCount Basie OrchestraWilliam "Count" BasieCount Basie SextetCount BassieBasie, CountCount Basie BandWilliam BasieWilliam James "Count" BasieBasie band
William James "Count" Basie (August 21, 1904 – April 26, 1984) was an American jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer.wikipedia
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Count Basie Orchestra

His Orchestraand his orchestraThe Count Basie Orchestra
In 1935, Basie formed his own jazz orchestra, the Count Basie Orchestra, and in 1936 took them to Chicago for a long engagement and their first recording.
The Count Basie Orchestra is a 16 to 18 piece big band, one of the most prominent jazz performing groups of the swing era, founded by Count Basie in 1935 and recording regularly from 1936.

Lester Young

LesterLester "Pres" YoungLester Young–Buddy Rich Trio
Many musicians came to prominence under his direction, including the tenor saxophonists Lester Young and Herschel Evans, the guitarist Freddie Green, trumpeters Buck Clayton and Harry "Sweets" Edison and singers Jimmy Rushing, Helen Humes, Thelma Carpenter, and Joe Williams.
Coming to prominence while a member of Count Basie's orchestra, Young was one of the most influential players on his instrument.

Buck Clayton

Clayton, BuckBuck Clayton All StarsWilbur Clayton
Many musicians came to prominence under his direction, including the tenor saxophonists Lester Young and Herschel Evans, the guitarist Freddie Green, trumpeters Buck Clayton and Harry "Sweets" Edison and singers Jimmy Rushing, Helen Humes, Thelma Carpenter, and Joe Williams. His personnel around 1937 included: Lester Young and Herschel Evans (tenor sax), Freddie Green (guitar), Jo Jones (drums), Walter Page (bass), Earle Warren (alto sax), Buck Clayton and Harry Edison (trumpet), Benny Morton and Dickie Wells (trombone).
Wilbur Dorsey "Buck" Clayton (November 12, 1911 – December 8, 1991) was an American jazz trumpet player who was a leading member of Count Basie's "Old Testament" orchestra and a leader of mainstream-oriented jam session recordings in the 1950s.

Helen Humes

(v. Helen Humes)
Many musicians came to prominence under his direction, including the tenor saxophonists Lester Young and Herschel Evans, the guitarist Freddie Green, trumpeters Buck Clayton and Harry "Sweets" Edison and singers Jimmy Rushing, Helen Humes, Thelma Carpenter, and Joe Williams.
Humes was a teenage blues singer, a vocalist with Count Basie's band, a saucy R&B diva, and a mature interpreter of the classy popular song.

Jimmy Rushing

James RushingJames ("Jimmy") Andrew RushingJames Andrew Rushing
Many musicians came to prominence under his direction, including the tenor saxophonists Lester Young and Herschel Evans, the guitarist Freddie Green, trumpeters Buck Clayton and Harry "Sweets" Edison and singers Jimmy Rushing, Helen Humes, Thelma Carpenter, and Joe Williams. In 1928, Basie was in Tulsa and heard Walter Page and his Famous Blue Devils, one of the first big bands, which featured Jimmy Rushing on vocals.
James Andrew Rushing (August 26, 1901 – June 8, 1972) was an American blues and jazz singer, and pianist from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, best known as the featured vocalist of Count Basie's Orchestra from 1935 to 1948.

James P. Johnson

James Price JohnsonJimmy JohnsonJames P Johnson
Soon, Basie met many of the Harlem musicians who were "making the scene," including Willie "the Lion" Smith and James P. Johnson.
As such, he was a model for Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Art Tatum, and Fats Waller.

Freddie Green

Freddie Greene
Many musicians came to prominence under his direction, including the tenor saxophonists Lester Young and Herschel Evans, the guitarist Freddie Green, trumpeters Buck Clayton and Harry "Sweets" Edison and singers Jimmy Rushing, Helen Humes, Thelma Carpenter, and Joe Williams. His personnel around 1937 included: Lester Young and Herschel Evans (tenor sax), Freddie Green (guitar), Jo Jones (drums), Walter Page (bass), Earle Warren (alto sax), Buck Clayton and Harry Edison (trumpet), Benny Morton and Dickie Wells (trombone).

Herschel Evans

Tex Evans
Many musicians came to prominence under his direction, including the tenor saxophonists Lester Young and Herschel Evans, the guitarist Freddie Green, trumpeters Buck Clayton and Harry "Sweets" Edison and singers Jimmy Rushing, Helen Humes, Thelma Carpenter, and Joe Williams.
Evans performed for a time with Lionel Hampton and Buck Clayton in Los Angeles, and in the mid-1930s returned to Kansas City to become a featured soloist in Count Basie's big band.

Thelma Carpenter

Many musicians came to prominence under his direction, including the tenor saxophonists Lester Young and Herschel Evans, the guitarist Freddie Green, trumpeters Buck Clayton and Harry "Sweets" Edison and singers Jimmy Rushing, Helen Humes, Thelma Carpenter, and Joe Williams.
She followed Helen Humes as Count Basie's vocalist in 1943, remaining with the band for two years, recording the Columbia Records hit "I Didn't Know About You" as well as many popular V-disc sides including "Do Nothing till You Hear from Me", "More Than You Know", "I Dream of You", "Tess's Torch Song" and "My Ideal".

Joe Williams (jazz singer)

Joe WilliamsJoeJoe Williams''''',
Many musicians came to prominence under his direction, including the tenor saxophonists Lester Young and Herschel Evans, the guitarist Freddie Green, trumpeters Buck Clayton and Harry "Sweets" Edison and singers Jimmy Rushing, Helen Humes, Thelma Carpenter, and Joe Williams.
By October 1950 he was again at the Club DeLisa with Red Saunders, where Count Basie heard him.

Jazz

jazz musicContemporary jazzModern Jazz
William James "Count" Basie (August 21, 1904 – April 26, 1984) was an American jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer.
Key figures in developing the "big" jazz band included bandleaders and arrangers Count Basie, Cab Calloway, Jimmy and Tommy Dorsey, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Fletcher Henderson, Earl Hines, Harry James, Jimmie Lunceford, Glenn Miller and Artie Shaw.

Earl Hines

Earl "Fatha" HinesHines, EarlHines
Little did Basie know this touch of royalty would give him proper status and position him with the likes of Duke Ellington and Earl Hines.
Count Basie said that Hines was "the greatest piano player in the world".

Jo Jones

Papa Jo JonesPapa" Jo JonesJonathan David Samuel Jones
His personnel around 1937 included: Lester Young and Herschel Evans (tenor sax), Freddie Green (guitar), Jo Jones (drums), Walter Page (bass), Earle Warren (alto sax), Buck Clayton and Harry Edison (trumpet), Benny Morton and Dickie Wells (trombone).
A band leader and pioneer in jazz percussion, Jones anchored the Count Basie Orchestra rhythm section from 1934 to 1948.

Ben Webster

WebsterBen [WebsterWebster, Ben
The band improved with several personnel changes, including the addition of tenor saxophonist Ben Webster.
Webster joined Bennie Moten's band in 1932, a grouping which also included Count Basie, Hot Lips and Walter Page.

Moten Swing

Moten Swing, Part 1Sing Moten's Swing
Their "Moten Swing", which Basie claimed credit for, was widely acclaimed and was an invaluable contribution to the development of swing music, and at one performance at the Pearl Theatre in Philadelphia in December 1932, the theatre opened its door to allow anybody in who wanted to hear the band perform.
Moten and his Orchestra, which included Count Basie on piano, achieved much success with it, although the song is most associated with Basie's Count Basie Orchestra, who recorded it in 1940.

Columbia Records

ColumbiaCBSCBS Records
After Vocalion became a subsidiary of Columbia Records in 1938, "Boogie Woogie" was released in 1941 as part of a four-record compilation album entitled Boogie Woogie (Columbia album C44).
Artists who have recorded for Columbia include AC/DC, Adele, Aerosmith, Louis Armstrong, Gene Autry, Count Basie, Nora Bayes, Bix Beiderbecke, Tony Bennett, Leonard Bernstein, Beyoncé, Blue Öyster Cult, Dave Brubeck, The Byrds, Mariah Carey, Pablo Casals, Johnny Cash, The Clash, The Cleveland Orchestra, Rosemary Clooney, Leonard Cohen, Ornette Coleman, Elvis Costello, Miles Davis, Neil Diamond, Celine Dion, Bob Dylan, Earth, Wind & Fire, Duke Ellington, 50 Cent, Flatt and Scruggs, Erroll Garner, Benny Goodman, Glenn Gould, Adelaide Hall, Herbie Hancock, Lauryn Hill, Billie Holiday, Vladimir Horowitz, Billy Joel, Blind Willie Johnson, Robert Johnson, Al Jolson, Janis Joplin, Andre Kostelanetz, Yo-Yo Ma, Johnny Mathis, John Mayer, George Michael, Mitch Miller, Charles Mingus, Thelonious Monk, Billy Murray, Willie Nelson, The New York Philharmonic, The Philadelphia Orchestra, Pink Floyd, Santana, Frank Sinatra, Simon and Garfunkel, Bessie Smith, John Philip Sousa, Bruce Springsteen, Igor Stravinsky, Barbra Streisand, System of a Down, James Taylor, Bonnie Tyler, Ethel Waters, Weather Report, Paul Whiteman, Andy Williams, Bert Williams, Pharrell Williams, Bob Wills, and Bill Withers.

Kansas City jazz

jazzKansas City Styleburgeoning jazz culture
Where the Blue Devils were "snappier" and more "bluesy," the Moten band was more refined and respected, playing in the "Kansas City stomp" style.
The hard-swinging, bluesy transition style is bracketed by Count Basie who in 1929 signed with the Bennie Moten's Kansas City Orchestra and Kansas City native Charlie Parker who ushered in the Bebop style in America.

Eddie Durham

In addition to playing piano, Basie was co-arranger with Eddie Durham, who notated the music.
He was a guitarist, trombonist, composer, and arranger for the orchestras of Bennie Moten, Jimmie Lunceford, and Count Basie.

Harry Edison

Harry "Sweets" EdisonSweets EdisonHarry Sweets Edison
Many musicians came to prominence under his direction, including the tenor saxophonists Lester Young and Herschel Evans, the guitarist Freddie Green, trumpeters Buck Clayton and Harry "Sweets" Edison and singers Jimmy Rushing, Helen Humes, Thelma Carpenter, and Joe Williams. His personnel around 1937 included: Lester Young and Herschel Evans (tenor sax), Freddie Green (guitar), Jo Jones (drums), Walter Page (bass), Earle Warren (alto sax), Buck Clayton and Harry Edison (trumpet), Benny Morton and Dickie Wells (trombone).
In 1937, he moved to New York and joined the Count Basie Orchestra.

One O'Clock Jump

One O'ClockTwo O'Clock Jump
Basie liked the results and named the piece "One O'Clock Jump."
"One O'Clock Jump" is a jazz standard, a 12-bar blues instrumental, written by Count Basie in 1937.

Asbury Park, New Jersey

Asbury ParkAsbury Park, NJAsbury Park City
He got some jobs in Asbury Park at the Jersey Shore, and played at the Hong Kong Inn until a better player took his place.
Musicians and bands with strong ties to Asbury Park, many of whom frequently played clubs there on their way to fame, include Fury of Five, The Gaslight Anthem, Clarence Clemons, the E Street Band, Jon Bon Jovi and Bon Jovi, Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes, Patti Smith, Arthur Pryor, Count Basie, The Clash, U.S. Chaos, Johnny Thunders, The Ramones, The Exploited, Charged GBH, Marty Munsch, Gary U.S. Bonds, along with many more.

John Hammond (record producer)

John HammondJohn H. HammondJohn Hammond, Jr.
In that city in October 1936, the band had a recording session which the producer John Hammond later described as "the only perfect, completely perfect recording session I've ever had anything to do with".
Hammond was instrumental in sparking or furthering numerous musical careers, including those of Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Benny Goodman, Harry James, Charlie Christian, Billie Holiday, Count Basie, Teddy Wilson, Big Joe Turner, Pete Seeger, Babatunde Olatunji, Aretha Franklin, George Benson, Freddie Green, Leonard Cohen, Arthur Russell, Jim Copp, Asha Puthli and Stevie Ray Vaughan.

Earle Warren

His personnel around 1937 included: Lester Young and Herschel Evans (tenor sax), Freddie Green (guitar), Jo Jones (drums), Walter Page (bass), Earle Warren (alto sax), Buck Clayton and Harry Edison (trumpet), Benny Morton and Dickie Wells (trombone).
Earle Warren (July 1, 1914 – June 4, 1994) was an American alto saxophonist, and occasional singer with Count Basie.

Oklahoma City Blue Devils

Blue Devils
Where the Blue Devils were "snappier" and more "bluesy," the Moten band was more refined and respected, playing in the "Kansas City stomp" style. In 1928, Basie was in Tulsa and heard Walter Page and his Famous Blue Devils, one of the first big bands, which featured Jimmy Rushing on vocals.
Several prominent jazz musicians were members, including Lester Young, William "Count" Basie and Buster Smith.

Boogie Woogie (album)

Boogie WoogieBoogie Woogie'' (album)
After Vocalion became a subsidiary of Columbia Records in 1938, "Boogie Woogie" was released in 1941 as part of a four-record compilation album entitled Boogie Woogie (Columbia album C44).
Artists featured on the album include Harry James, Count Basie, Big Joe Turner, and the three prominent boogie-woogie pianists of the time, Albert Ammons, Pete Johnson, and Meade Lux Lewis.