Counterfeit

counterfeitingcounterfeiterbootlegfakecoininganti-counterfeitingcounterfeitersbootleggedknock-offsanti-counterfeit
To counterfeit means to imitate something authentic, with the intent to steal, destroy, or replace the original, for use in illegal transactions, or otherwise to deceive individuals into believing that the fake is of equal or greater value than the real thing.wikipedia
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Counterfeit money

counterfeitingcounterfeitcounterfeiters
The counterfeiting of money is usually attacked aggressively by governments worldwide.
Producing or using counterfeit money is a form of fraud or forgery.

United States Secret Service

Secret ServiceU.S. Secret ServiceUS Secret Service
The United States Secret Service, mostly known for its guarding-of-officials task, was initially organized primarily to combat the counterfeiting of American money.
Until 2003, the Secret Service was part of the Department of the Treasury, as the agency was originally founded to combat the then-widespread counterfeiting of US currency.

Forgery

forgedforgerforgeries
Forgery is the process of making or adapting documents with the intention to deceive.
Forging money or currency is more often called counterfeiting.

Questioned document examination

forensic document examinationforensic document examinerQuestioned document examiner
Questioned document examination is a scientific process for investigating many aspects of various documents, and is often used to examine the provenance and verity of a suspected forgery.
These include identity theft, forgery, counterfeiting, fraud, or uttering a forged document.

Uttering

forging and utteringUnlawful use of means of publication and unlawful utterancesusing a false instrument
Uttering and publishing is a term in United States law for the forgery of non-official documents, such as a trucking company's time and weight logs.
Uttering is a crime involving a person with the intent to defraud that knowingly sells, publishes or passes a forged or counterfeited document.

Security printing

guillochéssecurity featuresguilloché art
Security printing is a printing industry specialty, focused on creating legal documents which are difficult to forge.
The main goal of security printing is to prevent forgery, tampering, or counterfeiting.

Copyright infringement

piracysoftware piracypirated
Egregious or large-scale commercial infringement, especially when it involves counterfeiting, is sometimes prosecuted via the criminal justice system.

Authentication

authenticityauthenticateauthenticated
It might involve validating personal identity documents, verifying the authenticity of a website with a digital certificate, determining the age of an artifact by carbon dating, or ensuring that a product or document is not counterfeit.

Counterfeit medications

counterfeit drugsCounterfeit drugcounterfeit medicines
A counterfeit medication or a counterfeit drug is a medication or pharmaceutical product which is produced and sold with the intent to deceptively represent its origin, authenticity or effectiveness.

Dual SIM

dual-SIMDualDual and triple SIM
An example would be imitation "Nokia" and "iPhone" cellular phones with features like dual SIM slots or analog TV, which are unavailable in authentic originals, or cosmetically-identical clones of high-end smartphones such as those from Hong Kong-based Goophone, using off the shelf system-on-chips from MediaTek and the Android operating system, often with user interfaces made to resemble the devices they imitate.
While some such phones are sold under generic names or are rebadged by smaller companies under their own brand, numerous manufacturers, especially in China, produce phones, including dual SIM models, under counterfeit trademarks such as those of Nokia or Samsung, either as cosmetically-identical clones of the originals, or in completely different designs, with the logo of a notable manufacturer present in order to take advantage of brand recognition or brand image.

Abercrombie & Fitch

Abercrombie and FitchAbercrombie & Fitch Co.Abercrombie
One of the largest seizures was a joint operation in Arizona, Texas and California that seized seventy-seven containers of fake "Nike Air Jordan" shoes and a container of "Abercrombie & Fitch" clothing, valued at $69.5 million.
Because of extensive counterfeiting of Abercrombie & Fitch goods, in 2006 the company launched a brand protection program to combat the problem worldwide (focusing more on China, Hong Kong, Japan and Korea) by working with legal forces globally.

S1 MP3 player

Chinese MP3 and MP4 players with a recording function, and voice recordersiPod" MP3
Another example would be imitation "iPod" MP3 players whose batteries are removable and replaceable, whereas in authentic originals the batteries are permanently installed.
There are also several models which carry no brand name or model number on the device or packaging, and a few sold under counterfeit trademarks such as Sony, Samsung, iPod, and others that use the same spelling in their brand name yet different brand styling, with inverse effect to established brands that offer similar or unrelated products.

Philatelic fakes and forgeries

stamp forgerforgeriesforgery
"We use the term "forgery" to indicate stamps produced to defraud collectors (properly known as forgeries) and to defraud stamp-issuing governments (properly known as counterfeits). "Fake" is used to indicate the alteration of a genuine stamp to make it appear as something else. Fakes might refer to cancellations, overprints, added or clipped perforations, stamp design alterations, etc."

Counterfeit banknote detection pen

Counterfeit banknotecounterfeit pen
Counterfeit banknote detection pens are used to detect counterfeit Swiss franc, euro and United States banknotes, amongst others.

Legal fake

Legal fake is not a legal term and should not be confused with counterfeit.

Prescription Drug Marketing Act

Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987
It establishes legal safeguards for prescription drug distribution to ensure safe and effective pharmaceuticals and is designed to discourage the sale of counterfeit, adulterated, misbranded, subpotent, and expired prescription drugs.

Gresham's law

Gresham’s Laweconomic theorygood money
Other examples of bad money include counterfeit coins made from base metal.

Tiffany (NJ) Inc. v. eBay Inc.

Tiffany Inc. v. eBay, Inc.Tiffany v. eBaytrial and on appeal
In the case Tiffany v. eBay, Tiffany & Co. sued auction site eBay for allowing the sale of counterfeit items, but lost on all claims.

Counterfeit consumer goods

knockoffcounterfeitknock-off
The economic standing of a country or region also contributed to the demand for these products as the average consumer can’t afford luxury prices but will gain the same social impact purchasing a knock-off that’s of almost indistinguishable quality to the original product.

Watered stock

stock wateringinflate the value of the stock artificiallyunrealistic capitalization

Currency

currenciesforeign currencycoinage
The word counterfeit frequently describes both the forgeries of currency and documents, as well as the imitations of items such as clothing, handbags, shoes, pharmaceuticals, aviation and automobile parts, watches, electronics (both parts and finished products), software, works of art, toys, and movies.

Document

documentsrecordsrecord
The word counterfeit frequently describes both the forgeries of currency and documents, as well as the imitations of items such as clothing, handbags, shoes, pharmaceuticals, aviation and automobile parts, watches, electronics (both parts and finished products), software, works of art, toys, and movies.

Clothing

apparelgarmentclothes
The word counterfeit frequently describes both the forgeries of currency and documents, as well as the imitations of items such as clothing, handbags, shoes, pharmaceuticals, aviation and automobile parts, watches, electronics (both parts and finished products), software, works of art, toys, and movies.

Handbag

pursehandbagspurses
The word counterfeit frequently describes both the forgeries of currency and documents, as well as the imitations of items such as clothing, handbags, shoes, pharmaceuticals, aviation and automobile parts, watches, electronics (both parts and finished products), software, works of art, toys, and movies.