County of Barcelona

BarcelonaCount of BarcelonaCataloniaCatalanBarcelonanCatalanscountess consort of BarcelonaCounts of Barcelonacountship of Barcelonacounty
The County of Barcelona (Comitatus Barcinonensis, Comtat de Barcelona) was originally a frontier region under the rule of the Carolingian dynasty.wikipedia
328 Related Articles

Count of Barcelona

Counts of BarcelonaBarcelonacomplete list
By the end of the 10th century, the Counts of Barcelona were de facto independent, hereditary rulers in constant warfare with the Islamic Caliphate of Córdoba and its successor states.
The County of Barcelona was created by Charlemagne after he had conquered lands north of the river Ebro.

Crown of Aragon

AragonAragoneseCatalan-Aragonese
Thenceforward, the history of the county of Barcelona is subsumed within that of the Crown of Aragon, but the city of Barcelona remained preeminent within it.
The Crown of Aragon ( Corona d'Aragón, Corona d'Aragó, Corona de Aragón) was a composite monarchy, also nowadays referred to as a confederation of individual polities or kingdoms ruled by one king, with a personal and dynastic union of the Kingdom of Aragon and the County of Barcelona.

Kingdom of Aragon

AragonAragoneseKing of Aragon
In 1164, the count of Barcelona, Alphons I, inherited the Kingdom of Aragon (as Alphons II).
It should not be confused with the larger Crown of Aragon, that also included other territories — the Principality of Catalonia (which included the County of Barcelona and the other Catalan Counties), the Kingdom of Valencia, the Kingdom of Majorca, and other possessions that are now part of France, Italy, and Greece — that were also under the rule of the King of Aragon, but were administered separately from the Kingdom of Aragon.

Septimania

GothiaMarch of GothiaGothic March
This was achieved by taking over the territories of Septimania that the Moors invaded in the 8th century and from these, those territories surrounding the Pyrenees and specially the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula.
The region was under the influence of the people from the count territories of Toulouse, Provence, and ancient County of Barcelona.

Barcelona

Barcelona, Spaincity of BarcelonaBarcino
The area was dominated by the Franks after the conquest of Girona (785) and especially when, in 801, the city of Barcelona was conquered by King Louis the Pious of Aquitaine, and was incorporated into the Frankish kingdom.
Founded as a Roman city, in the Middle Ages Barcelona became the capital of the County of Barcelona.

Catalan counties

CatalanCatalanscounties
The counts, through marriage alliances and treaties, acquired the other Catalan counties and extended their influence along Occitania.
The many counties (aside from the counties of County of Pallars, County of Urgell and County of Empuries) were to be soon absorbed into the County of Barcelona and one of his counts, prince Ramon Berenguer IV, count of Barcelona would marry princess Petronilla of Aragon of the Kingdom of Aragon in 1150, uniting as equals the County of Barcelona and the Kingdom of Aragon, thus being their son the first king of the Crown of Aragon, first king of both the Catalans and the Aragonese.

Girona

GeronaGirona, SpainA
The area was dominated by the Franks after the conquest of Girona (785) and especially when, in 801, the city of Barcelona was conquered by King Louis the Pious of Aquitaine, and was incorporated into the Frankish kingdom.
Wilfred the Hairy incorporated Girona into the County of Barcelona in 878.

Al-Andalus

AndalusianIslamic SpainMuslim Spain
However, the policies Bera adopted in an effort to maintain peace with Muslim ruled Al-Andalus, resulted in him being accused of treason before the King.
Following the Umayyad conquest of Hispania, al-Andalus, then at its greatest extent, was divided into five administrative units, corresponding roughly to modern Andalusia, Portugal and Galicia, Castile and León, Navarre, Aragon, the County of Barcelona, and Septimania.

James I of Aragon

James IJaime IJames I the Conqueror
Full independence was obtained by James I, King of Aragon, in the Treaty of Corbeil (1258).
By a treaty with Louis IX of France, he wrested the county of Barcelona from nominal French suzerainty and integrated it into his crown.

Ermesinde of Carcassonne

ErmesindeErmessendathe Countess Ermesinde
His mother was the forceful Ermesinde of Carcassonne.
972 – March 1, 1058) was Countess consort of Barcelona, Girona and Osona.

Principality of Catalonia

CataloniaCatalanPrincipality
Barcelona formed the nucleus of the emergent Principality of Catalonia.
As the Count of Barcelona and the Courts added more counties under his jurisdiction, such as the County of Urgell, the name of "Catalonia", which comprised several counties of different names including the County of Barcelona, was used for the whole.

Ramon Berenguer III, Count of Barcelona

Ramon Berenguer IIIRamón Berenguer IIIRaymond Berengar III
After a crisis provoked by the murder of Ramón Berenguer II and accusations of fratricide against his brother, who died in the First Crusade, his son and heir, Ramón Berenguer III, was able to consolidate and expand the boundaries of the county.
Ramon Berenguer III the Great was the count of Barcelona, Girona, and Ausona from 1086 (jointly with Berenguer Ramon II and solely from 1097), Besalú from 1111, Cerdanya from 1117, and count of Provence in the Holy Roman Empire, from 1112, all until his death in Barcelona in 1131.

Marca Hispanica

Spanish MarchCatalan countsGothia
After turning back deep Muslim incursions, the Frankish Empire under the Carolingian monarchs, created the Marches of Gothia and Hispania progressively.
After a series of struggles the County of Barcelona (with Ausona) was taken by Frankish forces in 801.

County of Besalú

Besalúcount of Besalúcountess consort of Besalú
He also received, by inheritance, the Besalú and Sardinia counties, gradually forming a territory very similar to what was once Old Catalonia.
Throughout most of its history it was attached to one of the other more powerful counties, but it experienced a century of independence before it was finally and irrevocably annexed to the County of Barcelona.

Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Barcelona

Ramon Berenguer IVRamón Berenguer IVRamon Berenguer IV of Barcelona
However another marriage, that of Ramon Berenguer IV of Barcelona and Petronilla of Aragon in 1137, resulted in a union of dynasties –the counts of Barcelona and the royal house of Aragon.
Ramon Berenguer IV (c. 1114 – 6 August 1162, Anglicized Raymond Berengar IV), sometimes called the Saint, was the Count of Barcelona who brought about the union of his County of Barcelona with the Kingdom of Aragon to form the Crown of Aragon.

Duchy of Aquitaine

Aquitaineking of AquitaineAquitanian
This resulted in the formation of an effective buffer zone between the Muslim Iberian peninsula and the Duchy of Aquitaine and Provence.
The county of Aquitaine as it stood in the High Middle Ages, then, was bordering the Pyrenees to the south (Navarre, Aragon and Barcelona, formerly the Marcha Hispanica) and the county of Toulouse and the kingdom of Burgundy (Arelat to the east.

House of Barcelona

Barcelonaof BarcelonaAragonese
During the 13th and 14th centuries, the county would still be ruled by the Kings of Aragon, but the death of Martí l'humà without descendence in 1410 ended the House of Barcelona and, as a result of the Caspe Agreement, county's ownership passed to the Trastámara dynasty, native of Castile, in the person of Ferdinand I.
The House of Barcelona was a medieval dynasty that ruled the County of Barcelona continuously from 878 and the Crown of Aragon from 1137 (as kings from 1162) until 1410.

Ferdinand I of Aragon

Ferdinand IFerdinandFerdinand of Antequera
During the 13th and 14th centuries, the county would still be ruled by the Kings of Aragon, but the death of Martí l'humà without descendence in 1410 ended the House of Barcelona and, as a result of the Caspe Agreement, county's ownership passed to the Trastámara dynasty, native of Castile, in the person of Ferdinand I.
Ferdinand I (Spanish: Fernando I; 27 November 1380 – 2 April 1416 in Igualada, Catalonia) called of Antequera and also the Just (or the Honest) was king of Aragon, Valencia, Majorca, Sardinia and (nominal) Corsica and king of Sicily, duke (nominal) of Athens and Neopatria, and count of Barcelona, Roussillon and Cerdanya (1412–1416).

County of Pallars

PallarsCount of PallarsCounts of Pallars Sovereign
Ramón Berenguer I reinforced the county's power by subjecting the rebellious Penedes nobles, partnering with the counts of Urgell and Pallars, acquiring the counties of Carcassonne and Rasez, charging pariahs from the Zaragoza and Lleida kingdoms, and renewing the legislative framework of the county to allow for the introduction of the Usages of Barcelona.
It was ruled by brothers of the native dynasty, which had married into the Bellonid dynasty ruling in Barcelona.

County of Carcassonne

Carcassonnecount of CarcassonneViscounty of Carcassonne
Ramón Berenguer I reinforced the county's power by subjecting the rebellious Penedes nobles, partnering with the counts of Urgell and Pallars, acquiring the counties of Carcassonne and Rasez, charging pariahs from the Zaragoza and Lleida kingdoms, and renewing the legislative framework of the county to allow for the introduction of the Usages of Barcelona.
Sold to County of Barcelona.

Spain

🇪🇸SpanishESP
The County of Barcelona and the Kingdom of Aragon entered in a dynastic union and gained territory and power in the Mediterranean.

Old Catalan

CatalanClassical Catalan
This phenomenon gained momentum with the separation of the County of Barcelona from the Carolingian Empire in 988 AD. By the 9th century, the Christian rulers occupied the northern parts of present-day Catalonia, usually termed "Old Catalonia", and during the 11th and 12th centuries they expanded their domains to the region north of the Ebro river, a land known as "New Catalonia".

Caliphate of Córdoba

CórdobaCaliph of CórdobaCaliph
By the end of the 10th century, the Counts of Barcelona were de facto independent, hereditary rulers in constant warfare with the Islamic Caliphate of Córdoba and its successor states.

Taifa

taifasTaifa kingdomsAndalusian Taifas
By the end of the 10th century, the Counts of Barcelona were de facto independent, hereditary rulers in constant warfare with the Islamic Caliphate of Córdoba and its successor states.

Occitania

OccitanOccitansAquitania
The counts, through marriage alliances and treaties, acquired the other Catalan counties and extended their influence along Occitania.