County of Tripoli

Tripolicount of TripoliCounts of TripoliBishop of Tripolicountess of TripoliCountship of TripoliCrusader countyCrusadersFrench CrusadesLebanon
The County of Tripoli (1109–1289) was the last of the Crusader states.wikipedia
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Crusader states

CrusaderCrusader stateOutremer
The County of Tripoli (1109–1289) was the last of the Crusader states.
The Crusader states in the Levant—the Kingdom of Jerusalem, the Principality of Antioch, the County of Tripoli, and the County of Edessa —were the first examples of "Europe overseas".

Crusades

crusadeCrusadersCrusader
When the Christian Crusaders – mostly Frankish forces – captured the region in 1109, Bertrand of Toulouse became the first Count of Tripoli as a vassal of King Baldwin I of Jerusalem.
Four Crusader states were established: the County of Edessa, the Principality of Antioch, the Kingdom of Jerusalem and the County of Tripoli.

Lebanon

LebaneseLebanese RepublicRepublic of Lebanon
It was founded in the Levant in the modern-day region of Tripoli, northern Lebanon and parts of western Syria which supported an indigenous population of Christians, Druze and Muslims.
The crusader state of the County of Tripoli, founded by Raymond IV of Toulouse in 1102, encompassed most of present-day Lebanon, falling to the Mamluk Sultanate in 1289 and finally to the Ottoman Empire in 1517.

Tripoli, Lebanon

TripoliTripolisTripoli (Lebanon)
It was founded in the Levant in the modern-day region of Tripoli, northern Lebanon and parts of western Syria which supported an indigenous population of Christians, Druze and Muslims.
During the Crusaders' rule the city became the capital of the County of Tripoli.

Raymond IV, Count of Toulouse

Raymond IV of ToulouseRaymond IVRaymond of Toulouse
Raymond IV of Toulouse was one of the wealthiest and most powerful of the Prince Crusaders.
He was the Count of Toulouse, Duke of Narbonne and Margrave of Provence from 1094, and he spent the last five years of his life establishing the County of Tripoli in the Near East.

Kingdom of Jerusalem

JerusalemKing of JerusalemCrusader
Meanwhile, the County of Edessa, the Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Principality of Antioch had been established.
Three other crusader states founded during and after the First Crusade were located further north: the County of Edessa (1097–1144), the Principality of Antioch (1098–1268), and the County of Tripoli (1109–1289).

List of principal leaders of the Crusades

List of principal CrusadersCrusader KingCrusader Kings
Raymond IV of Toulouse was one of the wealthiest and most powerful of the Prince Crusaders.

Principality of Antioch

AntiochPrince of AntiochAntioch, Principality of
Meanwhile, the County of Edessa, the Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Principality of Antioch had been established.
It extended around the northeastern edge of the Mediterranean, bordering the County of Tripoli to the south, Edessa to the east, and the Byzantine Empire or the Kingdom of Armenia to the northwest, depending on the date.

Tartus

TartousTortosaAntaradus
In 1102, Raymond IV occupied Tortosa (now Tartus) and in 1103, he prepared, together with veterans of the 1101 crusade, to take Tripoli.
Tartus (طرطوس / ALA-LC: Ṭarṭūs; known in the County of Tripoli as Tortosa and also transliterated Tartous) is a city on the Mediterranean coast of Syria.

First Crusade

CrusadersFirstCrusader
Even so, after the First Crusade, he had failed to secure any land holdings in the Near East.
During their conquests, the crusaders established the Latin Rite crusader states of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, the County of Tripoli, the Principality of Antioch, and the County of Edessa.

Byblos

JbeilGublaGibelet
The Genoese admiral Guglielmo Embriaco was awarded the city of Jubail.
Byblos, known locally as Jbeil (جبيل Jubayl) and in the County of Tripoli as Gibelet, is the largest city in the Mount Lebanon Governorate of Lebanon.

Mamluk Sultanate (Cairo)

MamlukMamluk Sultanate of EgyptMamluk Sultanate
The county was absorbed into Mamluk Egypt.
However, Louis IX died, allowing the Mamluks to refocus their efforts at further conquests of Crusader territories in Syria, including the County of Tripoli's Krak des Chevaliers fortress, which Baybars captured in 1271.

William II Jordan

William-JordanWilliam IIWilliam Jordan
Count William of Cerdagne, Raymond IV's cousin and comrade, was supported by Tancred, Prince of Galilee, but his succession in the Tripoli campaign was challenged by Raymond IV's illegitimate son, Bertrand of Toulouse.
William II Jordan (Guillem Jordà; Guilhèm Jordan) (died 1109) was the Count of Berga beginning in 1094, the Count of Cerdanya beginning in 1095, and Regent of the County of Tripoli beginning in 1105.

Montferrand (crusader castle)

Montferrand
He also controlled the hostile region of Montferrand, now modern-day Bar'in, Syria, lying to the east.
Montferrand was a fortress in the County of Tripoli (at the present-day village of Baarin in Syria), built in 1126.

Krak des Chevaliers

Crac des ChevaliersHisn al-AkradKrac des Chevaliers
Inland, the county's control extended to the Krac des Chevaliers fortress.
In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the order of the Knights Hospitaller.

Pons, Count of Tripoli

PonsPons of TripoliCount Pons
However, one of the Counts of Tripoli, Pons of Tripoli had formed an alliance with Antioch, and acknowledged the Latin Patriarch of Antioch.
undefined 1098 – 25 March 1137) was count of Tripoli from 1112 to 1137.

Bertrand, Count of Toulouse

BertrandBertrand of ToulouseBertrand of Tripoli
When the Christian Crusaders – mostly Frankish forces – captured the region in 1109, Bertrand of Toulouse became the first Count of Tripoli as a vassal of King Baldwin I of Jerusalem. Count William of Cerdagne, Raymond IV's cousin and comrade, was supported by Tancred, Prince of Galilee, but his succession in the Tripoli campaign was challenged by Raymond IV's illegitimate son, Bertrand of Toulouse.
Bertrand of Toulouse (or Bertrand of Tripoli) (died 1112) was count of Toulouse, and was the first count of Tripoli to rule in Tripoli itself.

Knights Hospitaller

Order of Saint JohnOrder of St. JohnHospitallers
In 1144, in order to increase the county's defences, particularly against Zangi of Mosul, Raymond II gave the Knights Hospitaller large stretches of frontier land along the Buqai'ah plain.
After the fall of the Kingdom of Jerusalem in 1291 (the city of Jerusalem had fallen in 1187), the Knights were confined to the County of Tripoli and, when Acre was captured in 1291, the order sought refuge in the Kingdom of Cyprus.

Raymond II, Count of Tripoli

Raymond II of TripoliRaymond IICount Raymond II
In 1137, Raymond II, the reigning count, lost control of Montferrand.
undefined 1116 – 1152) was count of Tripoli from 1137 to 1152.

Al-Mansur Qalawun

QalawunAl Mansur QalawunQalawun al-Alfi
In 1289 the County of Tripoli fell to Sultan Qalawun of the Muslim Mamluks of Cairo.
He captured Latakia in 1287 and Tripoli on April 27, 1289, thus ending the Crusader County of Tripoli.

Second Crusade

SecondCrusadersCrusade
In 1147, he joined the Second Crusade, which was launched in response to the loss of the County of Edessa to Turkish forces.
A fourth, the County of Tripoli, was established in 1109.

Battle of Ager Sanguinis

Battle of the "Field of BloodAger SanguinisBattle of Sarmada
In 1119, the Seljuk Empire again attacked Antioch, winning the Battle of Ager Sanguinis.
However, Roger of Salerno, who was ruling Antioch as regent for Bohemond II, did not take advantage of Ridwan's death; likewise, Baldwin II, count of Edessa, and Pons, count of Tripoli, looked after their own interests and did not ally with Roger against Aleppo.

County of Edessa

EdessaCount of EdessaCountship of Edessa
Meanwhile, the County of Edessa, the Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Principality of Antioch had been established.
Meanwhile, Joscelin II paid little attention to the security of his county, and argued with the counts of Tripoli who then refused to come to his aid.

Tancred, Prince of Galilee

TancredTancred of HautevilleTancred of Antioch
Count William of Cerdagne, Raymond IV's cousin and comrade, was supported by Tancred, Prince of Galilee, but his succession in the Tripoli campaign was challenged by Raymond IV's illegitimate son, Bertrand of Toulouse.
In 1110, he brought Krak des Chevaliers under his control, which would later become an important castle in the County of Tripoli.

Raymond III, Count of Tripoli

Raymond III of TripoliRaymond IIIRaymond of Tripoli
Raymond III (1140 – September/October 1187) was count of Tripoli from 1152 to 1187.