Coyote

coyotesCanis latranseastern coyoteC. latransPrairie wolfValley coyoteanimalbrush wolvesC. latrans incolatusC. latrans lestes
The coyote (Canis latrans) is a canine native to North America.wikipedia
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Wolf

wolvesgray wolfgrey wolf
It is smaller than its close relative, the gray wolf, and slightly smaller than the closely related eastern wolf and red wolf.
It is nonetheless closely related enough to smaller Canis species, such as the coyote and golden jackal, to produce fertile hybrids with them.

Red wolf

red wolvesCanis rufusC. rufus
It is smaller than its close relative, the gray wolf, and slightly smaller than the closely related eastern wolf and red wolf.
Morphologically it is intermediate between the coyote and gray wolf, and is very closely related to the eastern wolf of eastern Canada.

Canis

caninecaninescani-
The coyote (Canis latrans) is a canine native to North America.
Canis is a genus of the Canidae containing multiple extant species, such as wolves, coyotes and jackals.

Golden jackal

Indian jackaljackalCanis aureus
It fills much of the same ecological niche as the golden jackal does in Eurasia, though it is larger and more predatory, and is sometimes called the American jackal by zoologists.
The golden jackal is more closely related to the gray wolf, coyote, African golden wolf, and Ethiopian wolf than it is to the African black-backed jackal or side-striped jackal.

Eastern wolf

timber wolvesCanis lupus lycaoneastern timber wolf
It is smaller than its close relative, the gray wolf, and slightly smaller than the closely related eastern wolf and red wolf.
Many studies have found the eastern wolf to be the product of ancient and recent genetic admixture between the gray wolf and the coyote, while other studies have found some or all populations of the eastern wolf, as well as coyotes, originally separated from a common ancestor with the wolf over 1 million years ago and that these populations of the eastern wolf may be the same species as or a closely related species to the red wolf of the Southeastern United States.

Coywolf

coywolvescoywolf hybridshybridization with coyotes
In spite of this, coyotes sometimes mate with gray, eastern, or red wolves, producing "coywolf" hybrids.
Coywolf (sometimes called woyote) is an informal term for a canid hybrid descended from coyotes, eastern wolves and gray wolves.

Eastern coyote

coyoteeastern wolf × coyoteTweed wolf
In the northeastern regions of North America, the eastern coyote (a larger subspecies, though still smaller than wolves) is the result of various historical and recent matings with various types of wolves.
It was first noticed during the early 1930s to the late 1940s, and likely originated in the aftermath of the extirpation of the gray wolf in southeastern Ontario, Labrador and Quebec, thus allowing coyotes to colonize the former wolf ranges and mix with the remnant wolf populations.

Nahuatl

Nahuatl languageNáhuatlNahua
The first published usage of the word "coyote" (which is a Spanish borrowing of its Nahuatl name coyōtl ) comes from the historian Francisco Javier Clavijero's Historia de México in 1780.
[[List of English words from indigenous languages of the Americas#Words from Nahuatl|English words of Nahuatl origin]] include "avocado", "chayote", "chili", "chocolate", "atlatl", "coyote", "peyote", "axolotl" and "tomato".

Pleistocene coyote

La Brea coyote
Compared to their modern Holocene counterparts, Pleistocene coyotes (C.l. orcutti) were larger and more robust, likely in response to larger competitors and prey.
The Pleistocene coyote (Canis latrans orcutti), also known as the Ice Age coyote, is an extinct subspecies of coyote that lived in western North America during the Late Pleistocene era.

Great Plains wolf

C. l. nubilusCanis c.f. variabilisCanis lupus nubilus
Say was the first person to document the difference between a "prairie wolf" (coyote) and on the next page of his journal a wolf which he named Canis nubilus (Great Plains wolf).
Say was the first person to document the difference between a "prairie wolf" (coyote) and on the next page of his journal a wolf which he named Canis nubilus.

Thomas Say

SaySay TSay, T.
Say was the first person to document the difference between a "prairie wolf" (coyote) and on the next page of his journal a wolf which he named Canis nubilus (Great Plains wolf). The coyote was first scientifically described by naturalist Thomas Say in September 1819, on the site of Lewis and Clark's Council Bluffs, fifteen miles up the Missouri River from the mouth of the Platte during a government-sponsored expedition with Major Stephen Long.
Their official account of this expedition included the first descriptions of the coyote, swift fox, western kingbird, band-tailed pigeon, rock wren, Say's phoebe, lesser goldfinch, lark sparrow, lazuli bunting, orange-crowned warbler, checkered whiptail lizard, collared lizard, ground skink, western rat snake, and western ribbon snake.

Eucyon

Eucyon davisiEucyon kuta
Xiaoming Wang and Richard H. Tedford, one of the foremost authorities on carnivore evolution, proposed that the genus Canis was the descendant of the coyote-like Eucyon davisi and its remains first appeared in the Miocene 6million years ago (Mya) in the southwestern US and Mexico.
Eucyon (Greek: Eu: good, true; cyon: dog) is an extinct genus of small omnivorous coyote-like canid that first appeared in North America during the Miocene, living from 10.3—3.6 Ma and existed for approximately.

Aridoamerica

region
The coyote is a prominent character in Native American folklore, mainly in Aridoamerica, usually depicted as a trickster that alternately assumes the form of an actual coyote or a man.
Mammal species include the bobcat, coyote, black bear, black-tailed jackrabbit, desert cottontail, desert bighorn sheep, mule deer, white-tailed deer, gray fox, mountain lion, river otter, long-tailed weasel, western spotted skunk, pronghorn, raccoon, and Ord's kangaroo rat, elk, white-nosed coati, coati, collared peccary, jaguar, and Mexican wolf.

Plains coyote

coyoteC. l. latransC. latrans latrans
The Plains coyote (Canis latrans latrans), also known as the brush wolf, is a subspecies of coyote native to the Canadian Prairies of southeastern Alberta,

Oklahoma

OKState of OklahomaOklahoma, USA
The state holds populations of white-tailed deer, mule deer, antelope, coyotes, mountain lions, bobcats, elk, and birds such as quail, doves, cardinals, bald eagles, red-tailed hawks, and pheasants.

North America

NorthNorth AmericanNA
The coyote (Canis latrans) is a canine native to North America.
Notable North American fauna include the bison, black bear, prairie dog, turkey, pronghorn, raccoon, coyote and monarch butterfly.

Mearns coyote

coyotecoyotesC. l. mearnsi
The Mearns' coyote (Canis latrans mearnsi) is a subspecies of coyote native to the Southwestern United States.

Alberta

Alberta, CanadaABAlberta Transportation
As long as it was not in direct competition with the wolf, the coyote ranged from the Sonoran Desert to the alpine regions of adjoining mountains or the plains and mountainous areas of Alberta.
Smaller carnivores of the canine and feline families include coyotes, wolves, fox, lynx, bobcat and mountain lion (cougar).

Northeastern coyote

coyoteC. l. thamnosC. latrans thamnos
The Northeastern coyote (Canis latrans thamnos) is a subspecies of coyote native to north-central Saskatchewan, Manitoba (except the extreme southwestern

Washington (state)

WashingtonWashington StateWA
Mammals native to the state include the bat, black bear, bobcat, cougar, coyote, deer, elk, gray wolf, moose, mountain beaver, muskrat, opossum, pocket gopher, raccoon, river otter, skunk, and tree squirrel.

British Columbia

BCBritish Columbia, CanadaB.C.
Bears (grizzly, black—including the Kermode bear or spirit bear) live here, as do deer, elk, moose, caribou, big-horn sheep, mountain goats, marmots, beavers, muskrats, coyotes, wolves, mustelids (such as wolverines, badgers and fishers), cougars, eagles, ospreys, herons, Canada geese, swans, loons, hawks, owls, ravens, harlequin ducks, and many other sorts of ducks.

Durango

State of DurangoDurango, Mexicoa state in Mexico called Durango
Animals that can be found here include coyotes, gavilanes (sparrowhawks), various snakes, owls, chameleons, tarantulas and scorpions.

Zacatecas

State of ZacatecasZacatecas, MexicoEstado Libre y Soberano de Zacatecas
In the sierras there are many wild boar, white-tailed deer and hares; in the valleys and plains it is common to find coyote, badgers, quails and ducks.

New Mexico

NMState of New MexicoNew Mexican
Some of the native wildlife includes black bears, bighorn sheep, bobcats, cougars, coyotes, deer, elk, jackrabbits, kangaroo rats, javelina, porcupines, pronghorn antelope, roadrunners, western diamondbacks, wild turkeys, and the endangered Mexican gray wolf and Rio Grande silvery minnow.

Maryland

MDState of MarylandMaryland, USA
Mammals can be found ranging from the mountains in the west to the central areas and include black bears, bobcats, foxes, coyotes, raccoons, and otters.