A report on Vagus nerve and Cranial nerves

Plan of the upper portions of the glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves.
Left View of the human brain from below, showing origins of cranial nerves. Right Juxtaposed skull base with foramina in which many nerves exit the skull.
H&E stained fibers of the vagus nerve (bottom right) innervate the sinoatrial node tissue (middle left)
The oculomotor (III), troclear (IV) and abducens (VI) nerves supply the muscle of the eye. Damage will affect the movement of the eye in various ways, shown here.
Inferior view of the human brain, with the cranial nerves labeled.
The facial nerve (VII) supplies the muscles of facial expression. Damage to the nerve causes a lack of muscle tone on the affected side, as can be seen on the right side of the face here.
Section of the neck at about the level of the sixth cervical vertebra
A damaged glossopharyngeal nerve (IX) may cause the uvula to deviate to the affected side.
Transverse section of thorax, showing relations of pulmonary artery
The cranial nerves in the horse.
The arch of the aorta, and its branches
Ventral view of a sheep's brain. The exits of the various cranial nerves are marked with red.
Dura mater and its processes exposed by removing part of the right half of the skull, and the brain
The tracheobronchial lymph glands
Section of the medulla oblongata at about the middle of the olive
Hind- and mid-brains; postero-lateral view
Upper part of medulla spinalis and hind- and mid-brains; posterior aspect, exposed in situ
The right sympathetic chain and its connections with the thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic plexuses
The celiac ganglia with the sympathetic plexuses of the abdominal viscera radiating from the ganglia
The position and relation of the esophagus in the cervical region and in the posterior mediastinum, seen from behind
The thyroid gland and its relations
The thymus of a full-term fetus, exposed in situ
Deep dissection of vagus nerve
Vagus nerve – dissection

The vagus nerve, also known as the tenth cranial nerve, cranial nerve X, or simply CN X, is a cranial nerve that interfaces with the parasympathetic control of the heart, lungs, and digestive tract.

- Vagus nerve

The nerves are: the olfactory nerve (I), the optic nerve (II), oculomotor nerve (III), trochlear nerve (IV), trigeminal nerve (V), abducens nerve (VI), facial nerve (VII), vestibulocochlear nerve (VIII), glossopharyngeal nerve (IX), vagus nerve (X), accessory nerve (XI), and the hypoglossal nerve (XII).

- Cranial nerves
Plan of the upper portions of the glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves.

4 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Autonomic nervous system innervation, showing the parasympathetic (craniosacral) systems in blue.

Parasympathetic nervous system

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One of the three divisions of the autonomic nervous system, the others being the sympathetic nervous system and the enteric nervous system.

One of the three divisions of the autonomic nervous system, the others being the sympathetic nervous system and the enteric nervous system.

Autonomic nervous system innervation, showing the parasympathetic (craniosacral) systems in blue.

Specific nerves include several cranial nerves, specifically the oculomotor nerve, facial nerve, glossopharyngeal nerve, and vagus nerve.

Course of the left recurrent laryngeal nerve

Recurrent laryngeal nerve

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Course of the left recurrent laryngeal nerve
Passing under the subclavian artery, the right recurrent laryngeal nerve has a much shorter course than the left which passes under the aortic arch and ligamentum arteriosum.
Recurrent laryngeal nerve visible during resection of a goitre

The recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) is a branch of the vagus nerve (cranial nerve X) that supplies all the intrinsic muscles of the larynx, with the exception of the cricothyroid muscles.

Schematic diagram showing the central nervous system in yellow, peripheral in orange

Central nervous system

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Part of the nervous system consisting primarily of the brain and spinal cord.

Part of the nervous system consisting primarily of the brain and spinal cord.

Schematic diagram showing the central nervous system in yellow, peripheral in orange
Dissection of a human brain with labels showing the clear division between white and gray matter.
Diagram of the columns and of the course of the fibers in the spinal cord. Sensory synapses occur in the dorsal spinal cord (above in this image), and motor nerves leave through the ventral (as well as lateral) horns of the spinal cord as seen below in the image.
Different ways in which the CNS can be activated without engaging the cortex, and making us aware of the actions. The above example shows the process in which the pupil dilates during dim light, activating neurons in the spinal cord. The second example shows the constriction of the pupil as a result of the activation of the Eddinger-Westphal nucleus (a cerebral ganglion).
A map over the different structures of the nervous systems in the body, showing the CNS, PNS, autonomic nervous system, and enteric nervous system.
Schematic image showing the locations of a few tracts of the spinal cord.
Reflexes may also occur without engaging more than one neuron of the CNS as in the below example of a short reflex.
Diagram depicting the main subdivisions of the embryonic vertebrate brain, later forming forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain.
Development of the neural tube

In vertebrates, the CNS also includes the retina and the optic nerve (cranial nerve II), as well as the olfactory nerves and olfactory epithelium.

The brainstem at large provides entry and exit to the brain for a number of pathways for motor and autonomic control of the face and neck through cranial nerves, Autonomic control of the organs is mediated by the tenth cranial nerve.

Base of skull. Inferior surface. (label for jugular foramen is at right, third from the bottom)

Jugular foramen

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One of the two large foramina (openings) in the base of the skull, located behind the carotid canal.

One of the two large foramina (openings) in the base of the skull, located behind the carotid canal.

Base of skull. Inferior surface. (label for jugular foramen is at right, third from the bottom)
Jugular foramen
Base of the skull. Upper surface.

It allows many structures to pass, including the inferior petrosal sinus, three cranial nerves, the sigmoid sinus, and meningeal arteries.

The intermediate compartment transmits the glossopharyngeal nerve, the vagus nerve, and the accessory nerve.