Creative Commonswikipedia
Creative Commons (CC) is an American non-profit organization devoted to expanding the range of creative works available for others to build upon legally and to share.
creative commonsCCiCommonsCC-BY-2.0CC-BY-SACreative Commons BY-NC-SACreative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike Licenselicensed for free distributionCCLCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 License

Creative Commons license

CC-By-SACreative CommonsCreative Commons Attribution License
The organization has released several copyright-licenses known as Creative Commons licenses free of charge to the public.
They were initially released on December 16, 2002 by Creative Commons, a U.S. non-profit corporation founded in 2001.

Lawrence Lessig

Lawrence LessigLessig, LawrenceLarry Lessig
The organization was founded in 2001 by Lawrence Lessig, Hal Abelson, and Eric Eldred with the support of Center for the Public Domain.
In 2001, he founded Creative Commons, a non-profit organization devoted to expanding the range of creative works available for others to build upon and to share legally.

Hal Plotkin

The first article in a general interest publication about Creative Commons, written by Hal Plotkin, was published in February 2002.
He is currently the senior open policy fellow at Creative Commons.

Hal Abelson

Abelson, HaroldHarold Abelson
The organization was founded in 2001 by Lawrence Lessig, Hal Abelson, and Eric Eldred with the support of Center for the Public Domain.
Harold "Hal" Abelson (born April 26, 1947) is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, a fellow of the IEEE, and a founding director of both Creative Commons and the Free Software Foundation.

Aaron Swartz

Aaron Swartzatxatx (markup language)
Aaron Swartz played a role in the early stages of Creative Commons, as did Matthew Haughey.
He was involved in the development of the web feed format RSS and the Markdown publishing format, the organization Creative Commons, and the website framework web.py, and was a co-founder of the social news site Reddit.

David A. Wiley

David WileyWiley, David A.
In 2002 the Open Content Project, a 1998 precursor project by David A. Wiley, announced the Creative Commons as successor project and Wiley joined as CC director.
David A. Wiley is Chief Academic Officer of Lumen Learning, Education Fellow at Creative Commons, and Adjunct Faculty of Instructional Psychology & Technology at Brigham Young University where he was previously an Associate Professor.

Molly Shaffer Van Houweling

The founding management team that developed the licenses and built the Creative Commons infrastructure as we know it today included Molly Shaffer Van Houweling, Glenn Otis Brown, Neeru Paharia, and Ben Adida.
Van Houweling is Professor of Law and Associate Dean at the UC Berkeley School of Law and serves as the chair of the board of Creative Commons.

Eric Eldred

The organization was founded in 2001 by Lawrence Lessig, Hal Abelson, and Eric Eldred with the support of Center for the Public Domain.
Eldred co-founded Creative Commons and served on its board of directors.

Copyleft

copyleftcopyleft licenseweak copyleft
Creative Commons has been described as being at the forefront of the copyleft movement, which seeks to support the building of a richer public domain by providing an alternative to the automatic "all rights reserved" copyright, and has been dubbed "some rights reserved".
Creative Commons, a non-profit organization founded by Lawrence Lessig, provides a similar license provision condition called share-alike.

Bassel Khartabil

Bassel Khartabil was a Palestinian Syrian open source software developer and has served as project lead and public affiliate for Creative Commons Syria.
He has served as project lead and public affiliate for Creative Commons Syria, and has contributed to Mozilla Firefox, Wikipedia, Openclipart, Fabricatorz, and Sharism.

Matthew Haughey

Matt Haughey
Aaron Swartz played a role in the early stages of Creative Commons, as did Matthew Haughey.
Haughey then relocated to Portland, Oregon, and from 2002 to 2005 served as creative director at Creative Commons.

Free-culture movement

free culturefree culture movementfree-culture movement
Creative Commons is an organization started by Lawrence Lessig which provides licenses that permit sharing and remixing under various conditions, and also offers an online search of various Creative Commons-licensed works.

Ryan Merkley

Ryan Merkley is the CEO of the American non-profit organization Creative Commons.

Copyright

copyrightcopyright lawcopyrights
The organization has released several copyright-licenses known as Creative Commons licenses free of charge to the public. Creative Commons has been described as being at the forefront of the copyleft movement, which seeks to support the building of a richer public domain by providing an alternative to the automatic "all rights reserved" copyright, and has been dubbed "some rights reserved".
Founded in 2001 by James Boyle, Lawrence Lessig, and Hal Abelson, the Creative Commons (CC) is a non-profit organization which aims to facilitate the legal sharing of creative works.

Open Content Project

In 2002 the Open Content Project, a 1998 precursor project by David A. Wiley, announced the Creative Commons as successor project and Wiley joined as CC director.
Initiated in 1998 by David A. Wiley, it pre-dates free culture and Creative Commons.

Wikipedia

Wikipediawikipedia.orgparody of Wikipedia
Wikipedia uses one of these licenses.
Media files covered by free content licenses (e.g. Creative Commons' CC BY-SA) are shared across language editions via Wikimedia Commons repository, a project operated by the Wikimedia Foundation.

Open content

open contentopen-contentopen licence
In 2003 Wiley announced that the Open Content Project has been succeeded by Creative Commons and their licenses, where he joined as "Director of Educational Licenses".

Open-source model

open sourceopen-sourceopensource
Organizations such as Creative Commons host websites where individuals can file for alternative "licenses", or levels of restriction, for their works.

Flickr

flickrflickr.comFlikr
As of May 2018, Flickr alone hosts over 415 million Creative Commons licensed photos.
The licensing options primarily include the Creative Commons 2.0 attribution-based and minor content-control licenses – although jurisdiction and version-specific licenses cannot be selected.

License compatibility

compatibleincompatiblelicense compatibility
"By failing to take any firm ethical position and draw any line in the sand, CC is a missed opportunity. … CC has replaced what could have been a call for a world where 'essential rights are unreservable' with the relatively hollow call for 'some rights reserved. He also argued that Creative Commons worsens license proliferation, by providing multiple licenses that are incompatible.
In 2009, the Wikimedia Foundation switched from the GFDL to a Creative Commons CC-BY-SA license as the main license for their projects.

Digital rights management

digital rights managementDRMDRM-free
The maintainers of Debian, a GNU and Linux distribution known for its rigid adherence to a particular definition of software freedom, rejected the Creative Commons Attribution License prior to version 3 as incompatible with the Debian Free Software Guidelines (DFSG) due to the license's anti-DRM provisions (which might, due to ambiguity, be covering more than DRM) and its requirement that downstream users remove an author's credit upon request from the author.
Creative Commons provides licensing options encouraging the expansion of and building upon creative work without the use of DRM.

Public domain

public domainpublic domain resourcepublic-domain
Creative Commons has been described as being at the forefront of the copyleft movement, which seeks to support the building of a richer public domain by providing an alternative to the automatic "all rights reserved" copyright, and has been dubbed "some rights reserved".
In 2009 the Creative commons released the CC0, which was created for compatibility with law domains which have no concept of dedicating into public domain.

Commons

commonscommonthe commons
David Berry and Giles Moss have credited Creative Commons with generating interest in the issue of intellectual property and contributing to the re-thinking of the role of the "commons" in the "information age".

Public domain equivalent license

public domain like licensepublic domain equivalent licensepublic domain license
In 2009, Creative Commons released CC0, which was created for compatibility with jurisdictions where dedicating to public domain is problematic, such as continental Europe.