Cree language

CreelanguagecreCree dialectsCree wordCree-languageCree-MontagnaisCree-Montagnais languagesCree-Montagnais-Naskapi dialect continuumCree-Speakers
Cree (also known as Cree–Montagnais–Naskapi) is a dialect continuum of Algonquian languages spoken by approximately 117,000 people across Canada, from the Northwest Territories to Alberta to Labrador.wikipedia
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Cree

Cree peopleNehiyawCree Nation
Cree (also known as Cree–Montagnais–Naskapi) is a dialect continuum of Algonquian languages spoken by approximately 117,000 people across Canada, from the Northwest Territories to Alberta to Labrador.
Due to the many dialects of the Cree language, the people have no modern collective autonym.

Innu language

InnuMontagnaisInnu-aimun
Cree (also known as Cree–Montagnais–Naskapi) is a dialect continuum of Algonquian languages spoken by approximately 117,000 people across Canada, from the Northwest Territories to Alberta to Labrador.
It is a member of the Cree–Montagnais–Naskapi dialect continuum and is spoken in various dialects depending on the community.

Indigenous languages of the Americas

Native American languagesindigenous languagesNative American language
If classified as one language, it is the aboriginal language with the highest number of speakers in Canada.
Uto-Aztecan has the most speakers (1.95 million) if the languages in Mexico are considered (mostly due to 1.5 million speakers of Nahuatl); Na-Dené comes in second with approximately 200,000 speakers (nearly 180,000 of these are speakers of Navajo), and Algic in third with about 180,000 speakers (mainly Cree and Ojibwe).

Algonquian languages

AlgonquianAlgonquian languageAlgonquin
Cree (also known as Cree–Montagnais–Naskapi) is a dialect continuum of Algonquian languages spoken by approximately 117,000 people across Canada, from the Northwest Territories to Alberta to Labrador.

Plains Cree

CreePlains Cree languageNêhiyawêwin
A traditional view among 20th century anthropologists and historians of the fur trade posits that the Western Woods Cree and the Plains Cree (and therefore their dialects) did not diverge from other Cree peoples before 1670, when the Cree expanded out of their homeland near James Bay because of access to European firearms.
Plains Cree (endonym: ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐍᐏᐣ nēhiyawēwin) is a dialect of the Algonquian language, Cree, which is the most populous Canadian indigenous language.

Swampy Cree language

Swampy CreeSwampy Cree (Omushkegowuk)Cree
Swampy Cree (variously known as Maskekon, Omaškêkowak, and often anglicized as Omushkego) is a variety of the Algonquian language, Cree.

Woods Cree

Woods Cree languagecwd
It is part of the Cree-Montagnais-Naskapi dialect continuum.

Moose Cree language

Moose Creecrml-dialect
Moose Cree is a dialect of the Cree language spoken mainly in Moose Factory, Ontario.

Alberta

Alberta, CanadaABAlberta Transportation
Cree (also known as Cree–Montagnais–Naskapi) is a dialect continuum of Algonquian languages spoken by approximately 117,000 people across Canada, from the Northwest Territories to Alberta to Labrador.
The most common aboriginal language is Cree 17,215 (0.53%).

Northwest Territories

North-West TerritoriesNTNorth West Territories
Cree (also known as Cree–Montagnais–Naskapi) is a dialect continuum of Algonquian languages spoken by approximately 117,000 people across Canada, from the Northwest Territories to Alberta to Labrador.

Atikamekw language

Atikamekwatjlanguage
Atikamekw, which the endonym is Atikamekw Nehiromowin, literally the "Atikamekw Native language", is an Algonquian language, Cree, is the language of the Atikamekw people of southwestern Quebec.

East Cree

Southern East CreeNorthern East CreeJames Bay Cree
East Cree, also known as (Eastern) James Bay Cree, and East Main Cree, is a group of Cree dialects spoken in Quebec, Canada on the east coast of lower Hudson Bay and James Bay, and inland southeastward from James Bay.

Proto-Algonquian language

Proto-AlgonquianPA
Cree is believed to have begun as a dialect of the Proto-Algonquian language spoken 2,500 to 3,000 years ago in the original Algonquian homeland, an undetermined area thought to be near the Great Lakes.
It has merged with the reflex of *r in all Algonquian languages except for Cree and the Arapahoan languages.

Fort Smith, Northwest Territories

Fort SmithFort Smith, NWTFitzgerald No. 196
There, Cree is spoken mainly in Fort Smith and Hay River.
The main languages are English, Chipewyan (Dene), Cree, Dogrib (Tłı̨chǫ), Slavey-Hare, Inuinnaqtun (Inuvialuktun) and Inuktitut.

Circumflex

circumflex accentô^
Eastern James Bay Cree prefers to indicate long vowels (other than ) by doubling the vowel, while the western Cree use either a macron or circumflex diacritic; as is always long, often it is written as just ⟨e⟩ without doubling or using a diacritic.

Cree syllabics

Cree syllabarysyllabicsCree
Cree dialects, except for those spoken in eastern Quebec and Labrador, are traditionally written using Cree syllabics, a variant of Canadian Aboriginal syllabics, but can be written with the Latin script as well.
Cree syllabics are the versions of Canadian Aboriginal syllabics used to write Cree dialects, including the original syllabics system created for Cree and Ojibwe.

Canadian Aboriginal syllabics

syllabicsCanadian syllabicsUnified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics
Cree dialects, except for those spoken in eastern Quebec and Labrador, are traditionally written using Cree syllabics, a variant of Canadian Aboriginal syllabics, but can be written with the Latin script as well.
Canadian syllabics are currently used to write all of the Cree languages from Naskapi (spoken in Quebec) to the Rocky Mountains, including Eastern Cree, Woods Cree, Swampy Cree and Plains Cree.

Dialect continuum

dialect clusterdialect chaincontinuum
Cree (also known as Cree–Montagnais–Naskapi) is a dialect continuum of Algonquian languages spoken by approximately 117,000 people across Canada, from the Northwest Territories to Alberta to Labrador.
Cree is a group of closely related Algonquian languages that are distributed from Alberta to Labrador in Canada.

Eastern Cree syllabics

Eastern Syllabics
The dialects of Plains Cree, Woods Cree, and western Swampy Cree use Western Cree syllabics and the dialects of eastern Swampy Cree, East Cree, Moose Cree, and Naskapi use Eastern Cree syllabics.
Eastern Cree syllabics are a variant of Canadian Aboriginal syllabics used to write all the Cree dialects from Moosonee, Ontario to Kawawachikamach on the Quebec–Labrador border in Canada that use syllabics.

Naskapi language

Naskapiiiyuw-iyimuuunIyuw Imuun
Cree (also known as Cree–Montagnais–Naskapi) is a dialect continuum of Algonquian languages spoken by approximately 117,000 people across Canada, from the Northwest Territories to Alberta to Labrador.

Macron (diacritic)

macronīŪ
Eastern James Bay Cree prefers to indicate long vowels (other than ) by doubling the vowel, while the western Cree use either a macron or circumflex diacritic; as is always long, often it is written as just ⟨e⟩ without doubling or using a diacritic.

Chisasibi

Chisasibi, QuebecChisasibi (Cree reserved land)Fort George
In the Quebec communities of Chisasibi, Whapmagoostui, and Kawawachikamach, the long vowel has merged with.
Cree and Inuit are spoken as the first language in Chisasibi, in addition to English, as a primary language for official dealings.

Western Cree syllabics

Western Creewestern Cree usage
The dialects of Plains Cree, Woods Cree, and western Swampy Cree use Western Cree syllabics and the dialects of eastern Swampy Cree, East Cree, Moose Cree, and Naskapi use Eastern Cree syllabics.
It is used for all Cree dialects west of approximately the Manitoba–Ontario border in Canada, as opposed to Eastern Cree syllabics.

Mixed language

mixedmixed languageshybrid
Michif is a mixed language which combines Cree with French.
Michif derives nouns, numerals, definite/indefinite articles, possessive pronouns, some adverbs and adjectives from French, while it derives demonstratives (in/animate), question words, verbs (in/animacy agreement with the subject/object), and some adverbs/verb-like adjectives from Cree.

Winnipeg

Winnipeg, ManitobaWinnipeg, CanadaWinnipeg, MB
This language flourished at and around the Red River Settlement (modern day location of Winnipeg, Manitoba) by the mid to late 1800s.
The city is named after the nearby Lake Winnipeg; the name comes from the Western Cree words for muddy water.