Crime

criminalcriminalscriminal offencecriminalitycrimesfoul playoffencecriminal offenseoffenderoffense
In ordinary language, a crime is an unlawful act punishable by a state or other authority.wikipedia
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Legal remedy

remedyremedieslegal remedies
In addition, authorities provide remedies and sanctions, and collectively these constitute a criminal justice system.

Sanctions (law)

sanctionspenaltiespenalty
In addition, authorities provide remedies and sanctions, and collectively these constitute a criminal justice system.

Mutilation

mutilatedmaimmaiming
Some jurisdictions have penal codes written to inflict permanent harsh punishments: legal mutilation, capital punishment, or life without parole.

Legal person

legal personalitylegal entitybody corporate
Usually, a natural person perpetrates a crime, but legal persons may also commit crimes.

Richard Quinney

The sociologist Richard Quinney has written about the relationship between society and crime.

Social phenomenon

social phenomenabusiness/societal phenomenon
When Quinney states "crime is a social phenomenon" he envisages both how individuals conceive crime and how populations perceive it, based on societal norms.

Latin

Latin languageLat.la
The word crime is derived from the Latin root cernō, meaning "I decide, I give judgment".

Crimen

crīmen
Originally the Latin word crīmen meant "charge" or "cry of distress."

Ancient Greek

GreekClassical GreekGr.
The Ancient Greek word, from which the Latin cognate derives, typically referred to an intellectual mistake or an offense against the community, rather than a private or moral wrong.

Cognate

cognatescognationequivalent
The Ancient Greek word, from which the Latin cognate derives, typically referred to an intellectual mistake or an offense against the community, rather than a private or moral wrong.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
In 13th century English crime meant "sinfulness", according to the Online Etymology Dictionary.

Online Etymology Dictionary

Etymonline.comDouglas HarperEtymonline
In 13th century English crime meant "sinfulness", according to the Online Etymology Dictionary.

French language

FrenchfrancophoneFrench-language
It was probably brought to England as Old French crimne (12th century form of Modern French crime), from Latin crimen (in the genitive case: criminis).

Fault (law)

faultFault (legal)
In Latin, crimen could have signified any one of the following: "charge, indictment, accusation; crime, fault, offense".

Crisis

crisespolitical crisispersonal crises
The word may derive from the Latin cernere – "to decide, to sift" (see crisis, mapped on Kairos and Chronos).

Kairos

Divine timingkairotic momenttime
The word may derive from the Latin cernere – "to decide, to sift" (see crisis, mapped on Kairos and Chronos).

Chronos

ChronusKhronosTime
The word may derive from the Latin cernere – "to decide, to sift" (see crisis, mapped on Kairos and Chronos).

Ernest Klein

But Ernest Klein (citing Karl Brugmann) rejects this and suggests *cri-men, which originally would have meant "cry of distress".

Karl Brugmann

BrugmannBrugmann, KarlF. K. Brugmann
But Ernest Klein (citing Karl Brugmann) rejects this and suggests *cri-men, which originally would have meant "cry of distress".

Crying

cryweepingsobbing
Thomas G. Tucker suggests a root in "cry" words and refers to English plaint, plaintiff, and so on.

Plaintiff

claimantplaintiffscomplainant
Thomas G. Tucker suggests a root in "cry" words and refers to English plaint, plaintiff, and so on.

Gloss (annotation)

glossglossesglossed
The Latin word is glossed in Old English by facen, also "deceit, fraud, treachery", [cf.

American English

EnglishAmericanEnglish-language
Crime wave is first attested in 1893 in American English.

Omission (law)

omissionomissionsOmission (criminal law)
Whether a given act or omission constitutes a crime does not depend on the nature of that act or omission.

Trade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Act 1992

TULRCA 1992Trade Union and Labour Relations Actanti-trade union
For the purpose of section 243 of the Trade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Act 1992, a crime means an offence punishable on indictment, or an offence punishable on summary conviction, and for the commission of which the offender is liable under the statute making the offence punishable to be imprisoned either absolutely or at the discretion of the court as an alternative for some other punishment.