Crime After Crime (film)

Crime After Crime
Crime After Crime is a 2011 award-winning documentary film directed by Yoav Potash about the case of Deborah Peagler, an incarcerated victim of domestic violence whose case was taken up by pro bono attorneys through The California Habeas Project.wikipedia
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2011 in film

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Crime After Crime is a 2011 award-winning documentary film directed by Yoav Potash about the case of Deborah Peagler, an incarcerated victim of domestic violence whose case was taken up by pro bono attorneys through The California Habeas Project.

Yoav Potash

Crime After Crime is a 2011 award-winning documentary film directed by Yoav Potash about the case of Deborah Peagler, an incarcerated victim of domestic violence whose case was taken up by pro bono attorneys through The California Habeas Project.
Yoav Potash is a writer and filmmaker whose works include the documentaries Crime After Crime and Food Stamped.

Deborah Peagler

Debbie Peagler
Crime After Crime is a 2011 award-winning documentary film directed by Yoav Potash about the case of Deborah Peagler, an incarcerated victim of domestic violence whose case was taken up by pro bono attorneys through The California Habeas Project.
Her personal saga and her legal case are the subject of an award-winning documentary Crime After Crime by filmmaker Yoav Potash.

Arrested Development (group)

Arrested Development Arrested Development, Arrested Development
During production, Potash filmed the music group Arrested Development as they visited Debbie Peagler in prison, and sang with Peagler and the inmate gospel choir that she led.
The collaborative performance is included in Yoav Potash's award-winning documentary film Crime After Crime.

Heartland Film Festival

Heartland Film Festival 20142014 Heartland Film Festival8th Heartland Film Festival

Documentary film

documentarydocumentariesdocumentary series
Crime After Crime is a 2011 award-winning documentary film directed by Yoav Potash about the case of Deborah Peagler, an incarcerated victim of domestic violence whose case was taken up by pro bono attorneys through The California Habeas Project.

Domestic violence in the United States

domestic violencedomestic violence in the U.S.Domestic violence in United States
Crime After Crime is a 2011 award-winning documentary film directed by Yoav Potash about the case of Deborah Peagler, an incarcerated victim of domestic violence whose case was taken up by pro bono attorneys through The California Habeas Project.

Pro bono

pro-bonopro bono publicoFree Legal Assistance
Crime After Crime is a 2011 award-winning documentary film directed by Yoav Potash about the case of Deborah Peagler, an incarcerated victim of domestic violence whose case was taken up by pro bono attorneys through The California Habeas Project.

California Habeas Project

The California Habeas Project
Crime After Crime is a 2011 award-winning documentary film directed by Yoav Potash about the case of Deborah Peagler, an incarcerated victim of domestic violence whose case was taken up by pro bono attorneys through The California Habeas Project.

Solomon Burke

Burke
The band's performance of the Solomon Burke song "None of Are Free," with Peagler and the choir accompanying Arrested Development, is excerpted in the film and played in its entirety over the end credits.

San Francisco Foundation

The San Francisco FoundationJoseph Henry Jackson AwardJames D. Phelan Award
The film was funded by the Sundance Documentary Film Program, the San Francisco Foundation, the Lynn and Jules Kroll Fund for Jewish Documentary Film at the Foundation for Jewish Culture, the Pacific Pioneer Fund, the Bay Area Video Coalition, the Women in Film Foundation Film Finishing Fund supported by Netflix, the Jewish Federation of the Greater East Bay, and Jewish Family and Children's Services of San Francisco.

Bay Area Video Coalition

BAVC
The film was funded by the Sundance Documentary Film Program, the San Francisco Foundation, the Lynn and Jules Kroll Fund for Jewish Documentary Film at the Foundation for Jewish Culture, the Pacific Pioneer Fund, the Bay Area Video Coalition, the Women in Film Foundation Film Finishing Fund supported by Netflix, the Jewish Federation of the Greater East Bay, and Jewish Family and Children's Services of San Francisco.

Netflix

Netflix UKNetflix OriginalNetflix Series
The film was funded by the Sundance Documentary Film Program, the San Francisco Foundation, the Lynn and Jules Kroll Fund for Jewish Documentary Film at the Foundation for Jewish Culture, the Pacific Pioneer Fund, the Bay Area Video Coalition, the Women in Film Foundation Film Finishing Fund supported by Netflix, the Jewish Federation of the Greater East Bay, and Jewish Family and Children's Services of San Francisco. The film streamed for two years on Netflix and now streams here on Amazon Prime.

Oprah Winfrey Network

OWNOWN: Oprah Winfrey NetworkOWN Network
The film was picked up by the Oprah Winfrey Network for broadcast and home video distribution.

Home video

home entertainmenthome mediavideo album
The film was picked up by the Oprah Winfrey Network for broadcast and home video distribution.

PBS NewsHour

The NewsHour with Jim LehrerNewsHourPBS News Hour
PBS NewsHour also broadcast a nine-minute excerpt of the film as part of its Economist Film Project, as a collaboration with The Economist.

The Economist

EconomistEconomist magazineLondon Economist
PBS NewsHour also broadcast a nine-minute excerpt of the film as part of its Economist Film Project, as a collaboration with The Economist.

Amazon Prime

PrimeAmazon Prime DayAmazon
The film streamed for two years on Netflix and now streams here on Amazon Prime.

Rotten Tomatoes

RottenTomatoes.comGolden Tomato AwardsGolden Tomato
The film received a 91% positive approval score on Rotten Tomatoes, based on 32 reviews, with an average rating of 7.2/10.

Metacritic

Metacritic.comMetascoreuniversal acclaim
On Metacritic, the film has a weighted average score of 72 out of 100, based on 16 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews".

Sundance Film Festival

SundanceSundance FestivalThe Sundance Film Festival
The film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January 2011, and went on to earn a total of 25 major honors including the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award, The National Board of Review’s Freedom of Expression Award, and The Hillman Prize for Broadcast Journalism.

The Washington Post

Washington Postwashingtonpost.comWashington Post Magazine
The Washington Post listed the film as an Editors' Pick.

New York (magazine)

New YorkNew York MagazineVulture
New York Magazine also listed the film as a Critics' Pick, calling the film "riveting and devastating", and describing it as a story about "a great miscarriage of justice — but also one of heroic legal perseverance, with a surprisingly colorful cast of characters."