Crime of passion

crimes of passioncrime passionnelCrime passionelpassionCrimes of Passion (TV series)crimes of passion and violencecriminal by passionpassionatesudden passion
A crime of passion (French: crime passionnel), in popular usage, refers to a violent crime, especially homicide, in which the perpetrator commits the act against someone because of sudden strong impulse such as sudden rage rather than as a premeditated crime.wikipedia
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Manslaughter

involuntary manslaughterintoxication manslaughterinvoluntary homicide
Historically, such defenses were used as complete defenses for various violent crimes, but gradually they became used primarily as a partial defense to a charge of murder; if the court accepts temporary insanity, a murder charge may be reduced to manslaughter. In Australia, as in other common law jurisdictions, crimes of passion have traditionally been subjected to the partial defense of provocation, which converts what would have been murder into manslaughter.
This is sometimes described as a crime of passion.

Insanity defense

not guilty by reason of insanityinsanitycriminally insane
In the United States, claims of "crimes of passion" have been traditionally associated with the defenses of temporary insanity or provocation.
This legal defense is commonly used to defend individuals that have committed crimes of passion.

Domestic violence

domestic abusespousal abuseabusive
UN Women has urged states to review legal defenses of passion and provocation, and other similar laws, to ensure that such laws do not lead to impunity in regard to violence against women, stating that "laws should clearly state that these defenses do not include or apply to crimes of “honour”, adultery, or domestic assault or murder."
Crimes of passion in Latin America, a region which has a history of treating such killings with extreme leniency, have also come to international attention.

Murder

first-degree murderfirst degree murdersecond-degree murder
In Australia, as in other common law jurisdictions, crimes of passion have traditionally been subjected to the partial defense of provocation, which converts what would have been murder into manslaughter.
The jury might sympathize with the defendant (e.g. in a crime of passion, or in the case of a bullied victim who kills their tormentor), and the jury may wish to protect the defendant from a sentence of life imprisonment or execution.

Adultery

adulterousaffairadulterer
UN Women has urged states to review legal defenses of passion and provocation, and other similar laws, to ensure that such laws do not lead to impunity in regard to violence against women, stating that "laws should clearly state that these defenses do not include or apply to crimes of “honour”, adultery, or domestic assault or murder."
Opponents of adultery laws argue that these laws maintain social norms which justify violence, discrimination and oppression of women; in the form of state sanctioned forms of violence such as stoning, flogging or hanging for adultery; or in the form of individual acts of violence committed against women by husbands or relatives, such as honor killings, crimes of passion, and beatings.

Albert Lemaître

In September 1906 he was acquitted of a crime of passion.

Murder of David Lynn Harris

Clara HarrisDavid Lynn Harris
She was convicted of sudden passion and sentenced to twenty years in prison.

Henriette Caillaux

CaillauxHenrietteMadame Caillaux
She was defended by the prominent attorney Fernand Labori who convinced the jury that her crime, which she did not deny, was not a premeditated act but that her uncontrollable female emotions resulted in a crime of passion.

Death of Nikki Whitehead

murder of Nikki WhiteheadNikki Whiteheadmurdered their mother Nikki Whitehead
The medical examiner called the killing a crime of passion and not likely to have been performed by a stranger.

Honor killing

honour killinghonor killingshonour killings
Crimes of passion within Latin America have also been compared to honor killings.

Homicide

homicideshomicide detectivehomicidal
A crime of passion (French: crime passionnel), in popular usage, refers to a violent crime, especially homicide, in which the perpetrator commits the act against someone because of sudden strong impulse such as sudden rage rather than as a premeditated crime.

Mens rea

intentmental statemental element
The 'crime of passion' defense challenges the mens rea element by suggesting that there was no malice aforethought, and instead the crime was committed in the "heat of passion."

Malice aforethought

premeditationpremeditatedpremeditated nature
A crime of passion (French: crime passionnel), in popular usage, refers to a violent crime, especially homicide, in which the perpetrator commits the act against someone because of sudden strong impulse such as sudden rage rather than as a premeditated crime. The 'crime of passion' defense challenges the mens rea element by suggesting that there was no malice aforethought, and instead the crime was committed in the "heat of passion."

Provocation (legal)

provocationheat of passionprovocative
In the United States, claims of "crimes of passion" have been traditionally associated with the defenses of temporary insanity or provocation. In Australia, as in other common law jurisdictions, crimes of passion have traditionally been subjected to the partial defense of provocation, which converts what would have been murder into manslaughter.

United States House of Representatives

U.S. RepresentativeU.S. House of RepresentativesUnited States Representative
This defense was first used by U.S. Congresswoman Sara of Missouri in 1859 after he had killed his wife's lover, Barton Key II.

Daniel Sickles

Daniel E. SicklesDaniel Edgar SicklesDan Sickles
This defense was first used by U.S. Congresswoman Sara of Missouri in 1859 after he had killed his wife's lover, Barton Key II.

New York (state)

New YorkNew York StateNY
This defense was first used by U.S. Congresswoman Sara of Missouri in 1859 after he had killed his wife's lover, Barton Key II.

San Francisco

San Francisco, CaliforniaSan Francisco, CACity and County of San Francisco
This defense was first used by U.S. Congresswoman Sara of Missouri in 1859 after he had killed his wife's lover, Barton Key II.

France

FrenchFRAFrench Republic
In some countries, notably France, crime passionnel (or crime of passion) was a valid defense to murder charges.

Custodial sentence

custodialnon-custodial sentenceprison sentence
During the 19th century, some such cases resulted in a custodial sentence for the murderer of two years.

Napoleonic Code

Code CivilFrench Civil CodeCode Napoleon
After the Napoleonic code was updated in the 1970s, paternal authority over the members of the family was ended, thus reducing the occasions for which crime passionnel could be claimed.

UN Women

United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of WomenUnited Nations WomenDivision for the Advancement of Women
UN Women has urged states to review legal defenses of passion and provocation, and other similar laws, to ensure that such laws do not lead to impunity in regard to violence against women, stating that "laws should clearly state that these defenses do not include or apply to crimes of “honour”, adultery, or domestic assault or murder."

Violence against women

violencegender violencegender-based violence
UN Women has urged states to review legal defenses of passion and provocation, and other similar laws, to ensure that such laws do not lead to impunity in regard to violence against women, stating that "laws should clearly state that these defenses do not include or apply to crimes of “honour”, adultery, or domestic assault or murder."

Human Rights Watch

HRWAmericas WatchHuman Right Watch
However, Widney Brown, advocacy director for Human Rights Watch, argued that "crimes of passion have a similar dynamic in that the women are killed by male family members and the crimes are perceived as excusable or understandable".