Crispus

Flavius Julius CrispusCrispus CaesarFlavius CrispusFlavius Julius Crispus CaesarFlavius Julius Valerius Crispus
Flavius Julius Crispus (died 326), also known as Flavius Claudius Crispus and Flavius Valerius Crispus, was a Caesar of the Roman Empire.wikipedia
109 Related Articles

Lactantius

Lucius Caecilius Firmianus LactantiusDe mortibus persecutorumFirmianus (Lactantius)
The earliest date is most likely, since he was being tutored in 309-310 by Lactantius.
250 – c. 325) was an early Christian author who became an advisor to the first Christian Roman emperor, Constantine I, guiding his religious policy as it developed, and a tutor to his son Crispus.

Minervina

He was the first-born son of Constantine I and Minervina. His mother Minervina was either a concubine or a first wife to Constantine.
Constantine either took her as a concubine or married her in 303 AD, and the couple had one son, Crispus.

Caesar (title)

CaesarCaesarsKayser-i Rûm
Flavius Julius Crispus (died 326), also known as Flavius Claudius Crispus and Flavius Valerius Crispus, was a Caesar of the Roman Empire.
In the case of Constantine, this meant that by the time he died, he had four Caesars: Constantius II, Constantine II, Constans and his nephew Dalmatius, with his eldest son Crispus having been executed in mysterious circumstances earlier in his reign.

Fausta

Fausta Flavia MaximaEmpress Fausta
In 307, Constantine allied to the Italian Augusti, and this alliance was sealed with the marriage of Constantine to Maximian's daughter Fausta.
However, in 326, Fausta was put to death by Constantine, following the execution of Crispus, his eldest son by Minervina.

Constantine the Great

Constantine IConstantineEmperor Constantine
He was the first-born son of Constantine I and Minervina.
They clashed again at the Battle of Mardia in 317, and agreed to a settlement in which Constantine's sons Crispus and Constantine II, and Licinius' son Licinianus were made caesars.

Constantine II (emperor)

Constantine IIConstantineFlavius Claudius Constantinus
On 1 March 317, the two co-reigning Augusti jointly proclaimed three new Caesars: Crispus, alongside his younger half-brother Constantine II, and his first cousin Licinius Iunior.
At age ten, he became commander of Gaul, following the death of his half-brother Crispus.

Battle of the Hellespont

Battle of HellespontHellespontclashed in 324 AD
The subsequent Battle of the Hellespont was fought at the straits of Bosporus.
The Battle of the Hellespont, consisting of two separate naval clashes, was fought in 324 between a Constantinian fleet, led by the eldest son of Constantine I, Crispus; and a larger fleet under Licinius' admiral, Abantus (or Amandus).

Pula

PolaPula, CroatiaPietas Julia
On his father's orders, he was tried by a local court at Pola, Istria, condemned to death and execution by hanging.
The town was the site of Crispus Caesar's execution in 326 AD and Gallus Caesar's execution in 354 AD.

Licinius

Emperor LiciniusValerius LiciniusLicinius I
By 313, there were two remaining Augusti in control of the Roman Empire—Constantine in the west and his brother-in-law Licinius in the east.
The defeat of the superior fleet of Licinius in the Battle of the Hellespont by Crispus, Constantine’s eldest son and Caesar, compelled his withdrawal to Bithynia, where a last stand was made; the Battle of Chrysopolis, near Chalcedon (September 18), resulted in Licinius' final submission.

Battle of Chrysopolis

battle outside ChrysopolisChalcedonChrysopolis
Crispus led the legions assigned to him in another victorious battle outside Chrysopolis against the armies of Licinius.
His admiral, Abantus, had been outfought by Constantine's son, the caesar Crispus, despite the latter's distinctly smaller fleet.

Licinius II

Valerius Licinianus LiciniusLicinius the YoungerFlavius Valerius Licinianus Licinius
On 1 March 317, the two co-reigning Augusti jointly proclaimed three new Caesars: Crispus, alongside his younger half-brother Constantine II, and his first cousin Licinius Iunior.
The younger Licinius, who was Constantine's nephew, also fell victim to the emperor's suspicions and was killed, in Pola, probably in the context of the execution of Crispus in 326.

Roman Empire

RomanRomansEmpire
Flavius Julius Crispus (died 326), also known as Flavius Claudius Crispus and Flavius Valerius Crispus, was a Caesar of the Roman Empire.

Concubinage

concubineconcubinesconcubin
His mother Minervina was either a concubine or a first wife to Constantine.

Diocletian

Emperor DiocletianDiocletian ReformsDiocletianus
His father served as a hostage in the court of Diocletian in Nicomedia, thus securing the loyalty of Constantine's father, Constantius Chlorus, who was Caesar to Maximian in the west at this time.

Nicomedia

AstacusNicomedeiacity
His father served as a hostage in the court of Diocletian in Nicomedia, thus securing the loyalty of Constantine's father, Constantius Chlorus, who was Caesar to Maximian in the west at this time.

Constantius Chlorus

ConstantiusConstantius IConstantius I Chlorus
His father served as a hostage in the court of Diocletian in Nicomedia, thus securing the loyalty of Constantine's father, Constantius Chlorus, who was Caesar to Maximian in the west at this time.

Maximian

Emperor MaximianMaximianus HerculiusMaximian Herculeus
His father served as a hostage in the court of Diocletian in Nicomedia, thus securing the loyalty of Constantine's father, Constantius Chlorus, who was Caesar to Maximian in the west at this time. Constantine's father later had to divorce her for political reasons—specifically, to marry Flavia Maximiana Theodora, the daughter of Maximian.

Augustus (title)

AugustusAugustiAugusta
In 307, Constantine allied to the Italian Augusti, and this alliance was sealed with the marriage of Constantine to Maximian's daughter Fausta.

Divorce

divorceddivorceedivorcée
If Minervina were his legitimate wife, Constantine would have needed to secure a divorce before marrying Fausta, which would have required an official written order signed by Constantine himself, but no such order is mentioned by contemporary sources.

Gaul

GallicGalliaGallia Comata
The offspring of an illegitimate affair could have caused dynastic problems and would likely be dismissed, but Crispus was raised by his father in Gaul.

Helena (empress)

HelenaSaint HelenaSaint Helen
The story of Minervina is quite similar to that of Constantine's mother Helena.

Flavia Maximiana Theodora

Theodora
Constantine's father later had to divorce her for political reasons—specifically, to marry Flavia Maximiana Theodora, the daughter of Maximian.

Trier

TrevesTrier, GermanyAugusta Treverorum
The new Caesar soon held residence in Augusta Treverorum (modern Trier), regional capital of Germania.

Germania

Magna GermaniaGermania MagnaGermanic
The new Caesar soon held residence in Augusta Treverorum (modern Trier), regional capital of Germania.

Eusebius

Eusebius of CaesareaEusebianOnomasticon
Eusebius of Caesarea reported that Constantine was proud of his son and very pleased to become a grandfather.