Croats

CroatianCroatCroatiansCroatiaCroatian peopleCroatian descentCatholicCroat peopleCroatian immigrationCroato
Croats (Hrvati, ) or Croatians are a nation and South Slavic ethnic group native to Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina.wikipedia
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Croatia

Republic of CroatiaCroatianCRO
Croats (Hrvati, ) or Croatians are a nation and South Slavic ethnic group native to Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Croatian language is official in Croatia, the European Union, and Bosnia and Herzegovina.
Inhabited since the Paleolithic Age, the Croats arrived in the area in the 6th century and organised the territory into two duchies by the 9th century.

Croats of Serbia

CroatsCroatCroats of Vojvodina
They are also a recognized minority in a number of neighboring countries, namely Austria, the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, and Slovenia.
Croats are a recognized national minority in Serbia, a status they received in 2002.

South Slavs

South SlavicSouth SlavSlavic
Croats (Hrvati, ) or Croatians are a nation and South Slavic ethnic group native to Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina.
The South Slavs today include the nations of Bosniaks, Bulgarians, Croats, Macedonians, Montenegrins, Serbs and Slovenes.

Croats of Italy

ItalyItalian Croats
They are also a recognized minority in a number of neighboring countries, namely Austria, the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, and Slovenia.
Croats form a part of the permanent population of Italy (Hrvati u Italiji).

Croats of Slovenia

CroatsSloveniaSlovenian
They are also a recognized minority in a number of neighboring countries, namely Austria, the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, and Slovenia.
The Croats are an ethnic group in Slovenia.

Croatian diaspora

Croatian ancestrydiasporaVoting abroad
Due to political, social and economic reasons, many Croats migrated to North and South America (Argentina, Chile, and Paraguay) as well as Australia and New Zealand, establishing a diaspora in the aftermath of World War II, with grassroots assistance from earlier communities and the Roman Catholic Church.
The Croatian diaspora consists of communities of ethnic Croats and/or Croatian citizens living outside Croatia.

Croats in Slovakia

Croatsethnic CroatianSlovakia
They are also a recognized minority in a number of neighboring countries, namely Austria, the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, and Slovenia.
The Croats (Hrvati; Chorváti) are an ethnic minority in Slovakia, numbering 850 people according to the 2001 census, although the relatively compact Croatian community may number as many as 3500 people.

Croats of Romania

CroatsBanat CroatsCroat
They are also a recognized minority in a number of neighboring countries, namely Austria, the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, and Slovenia.
Croats (Hrvati, Croați) are an ethnic minority in Romania, numbering 6,786 people according to the 2002 census.

Croatian language

CroatianCroathr
The Croatian language is official in Croatia, the European Union, and Bosnia and Herzegovina.
Croatian (hrvatski ) is the standardized variety of the Serbo-Croatian language used by Croats, principally in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Serbian province of Vojvodina, and other neighboring countries.

Heraclius

Emperor HeracliusHeraclius IHeraclius the Younger
It mainly served as Byzantine propaganda praising Emperor Heraclius for repopulating the Balkans (previously devastated by the Avars) with Croats, who were seen by the Byzantines as tributary peoples living on what had always been 'Roman land'.
Heraclius entered diplomatic relations with the Croats and Serbs in the Balkans.

Carașova

CaraşovaNermedIabalcea
Croatian is a recognised minority language within Croatian autochthonous communities and minorities in Montenegro, Austria (Burgenland), Italy (Molise), Romania (Carașova, Lupac) and Serbia (Vojvodina).
According to the 2001 census in Romania, the population of Carașova municipality comprises 78.28% Croats, 7.58% Romanians, 6.93% others, and 5.6% Romani.

Dalmatia

Dalmatian coastDalmatianDalmatian Islands
Archaeological evidence shows population continuity in coastal Dalmatia and Istria.
With the arrival of Croats to the area in the 8th century, who occupied most of the hinterland, Croatian and Romance elements began to intermix in language and culture.

Budapest

Budapest, HungaryPestBuda
In 896, his rule stretched from Vienna and Budapest to the southern Croat dutchies, and included almost the whole of ex-Roman Pannonian provinces (whole 4).
This time, the Holy League's army was twice as large, containing over 74,000 men, including German, Croat, Dutch, Hungarian, English, Spanish, Czech, Italian, French, Burgundian, Danish and Swedish soldiers, along with other Europeans as volunteers, artillerymen, and officers.

Trpimirović dynasty

TrpimirovićHouse of TrpimirovićHouse of Trpimir
Trpimir is remembered as the initiator of the Trpimirović dynasty, that ruled in Croatia, with interruptions, from 845 until 1091.
Trpimirović dynasty (Trpimirovići) was a native Croatian dynasty that ruled in the Duchy and later the Kingdom of Croatia, with interruptions by the Domagojević dynasty from 845 until 1091.

Zadar

ZaraZadar, CroatiaIader
Krešimir was succeeded by his son Stjepan I (1030–1058), who tried to reinforce the alliance with the Byzantines when he sent a segment of his naval fleet in war against the Arabs in 1032, in favour for their tolerance about conquering Zadar another Byzantine ally, from Venice.
After the fall of the Western Roman Empire in 476 and the destruction of Salona by the Avars and Croats in 614, Zadar became the capital of the Byzantine theme of Dalmatia.

Tanais Tablets

inscriptioninscriptions
The major basis for this connection was the perceived similarity between Hrvat and inscriptions from the Tanais dated to the 2nd and 3rd centuries CE, mentioning the name Khoro(u)athos.
The tablets are considered important for the early Croatian history.

Trpimir I of Croatia

Trpimir ITrpimirDuke Trpimir
The ethnonym "Croat" is first attested during the 9th century CE, in the charter of Duke Trpimir; and indeed begins to be widely attested throughout central and eastern Europe during the 9th and 10th centuries.
The Bulgarians and Croatians coexisted peacefully after that time.

Sisak

SisciaSegesticaSisak, Croatia
Also prominent in the territory of future Croatia was the polity of Prince Liutevid, who ruled the territories between the Drava and Sava rivers ("Pannonia Inferior"), centred from his fort at Sisak.
The fortress is famous for the victory of the joint forces of Croats, Austrians and Carniolans (Slovenes) over the Ottomans in 1593, known as the Battle of Sisak.

Vojvodina

Autonomous Province of VojvodinaVoivodinaAP Vojvodina
Croatian is a recognised minority language within Croatian autochthonous communities and minorities in Montenegro, Austria (Burgenland), Italy (Molise), Romania (Carașova, Lupac) and Serbia (Vojvodina).
On 25 November 1918, the Assembly of Serbs, Bunjevci, and other nations of Vojvodina in Novi Sad proclaimed the unification of Vojvodina (Banat, Bačka and Baranja) with the Kingdom of Serbia (The assembly numbered 757 deputies, of which 578 were Serbs, 84 Bunjevci, 62 Slovaks, 21 Rusyn, 6 Germans, 3 Šokci, 2 Croats and 1 Hungarian).

Tomislavgrad

DuvnoDuvanjsko PoljeDumno
The central town in the Duvno field was named Tomislavgrad ("Tomislav's town") in his honour in the 20th century.

Duchy of Pannonian Croatia

Pannonian CroatiaPrincipality of Pannonian CroatiaDuchy of Pannonia
Nevertheless, two independent Slavic dukedoms emerged sometime during the 9th century: the Croat Duchy and Principality of Lower Pannonia.
According to De administrando imperio, at the time of the rule of Emperor Herakleios (610–640), Croats arrived in Dalmatia, founded a duchy there and, shortly afterward, a part of them went to the north to Pannonia and founded another duchy there (Pannonian Croatia).

Byzantine Empire

ByzantineEastern Roman EmpireByzantines
Contemporary scholarship views the rise of "Croats" as an autochthonous, Dalmatian response to the demise of the Avar khanate and the encroachment of Frankish and Byzantine Empires into northern Dalmatia.
Tribes of Serbs and Croats were later resettled in the northwestern Balkans, during the reign of Heraclius.

Nelipić family

NelipićNelipić noble familyHouse of Nelipić
Other powerful families were Nelipić from Dalmatian Zagora (14th–15th centuries); Kačić who ruled over Pagania and were famous for piracy and wars against Venice (12th–13th centuries); Kurjaković family, a branch of the old Croatian noble family Gusić from Krbava (14th–16th centuries); Babonići who ruled from western Kupa to eastern Vrbas and Bosna rivers, and were bans of Slavonia (13th–14th centuries); Iločki family who ruled over Slavonian stronghold-cities, and in the 15th century rose to power.
The Nelipić, also called Nelipac or Nelipčić, were a medieval Croatian noble family from Dalmatian Zagora in Croatia.

Újlaki family

IločkiÚjlakiHouse of Ilok
Other powerful families were Nelipić from Dalmatian Zagora (14th–15th centuries); Kačić who ruled over Pagania and were famous for piracy and wars against Venice (12th–13th centuries); Kurjaković family, a branch of the old Croatian noble family Gusić from Krbava (14th–16th centuries); Babonići who ruled from western Kupa to eastern Vrbas and Bosna rivers, and were bans of Slavonia (13th–14th centuries); Iločki family who ruled over Slavonian stronghold-cities, and in the 15th century rose to power.
The House of Ilok (Iločki; ), in old sources de Illoch, de Wylak, de Voilack etc., Hungarian: Újlaki) was a Croatian noble family, descended in the male line from Gug (in some sources Göge), a member of the lower nobility in the region of Lower Slavonia during the 13th century.

Šubić family

ŠubićŠubić noble familyHouse of Šubić
In Croatia the Šubić were one of the oldest Croatian noble families and would become particularly influential and important, ruling the area between Zrmanja and the Krka rivers.
The Byzantine emperor Constantine Porphyrogenitus wrote in the 10th century about the Croats settling in Dalmatia in the 7th century and described how they had organised their country into eleven counties (zupanias) one of which was Breberi, centred on site of the old Varvaria (Moravcsik & Jenkins, eds.