Crosier

crozierpastoral staffstaffpaterissacrookbishop's staffcroziersepiscopal staffpateritsapontifical staff
A crosier (also known as a crozier, paterissa, pastoral staff, or bishop's staff) is a stylized staff carried by high-ranking Roman Catholic, Eastern Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican, and some Lutheran, United Methodist and Pentecostal prelates.wikipedia
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Lituus

lituilituotubicen
One example is the lituus, the traditional staff of the ancient Roman augurs, as well as the staff of Moses in the Hebrew Bible.
The lituus was a crooked wand (similar in shape to the top part of some Western European crosiers) used as a cult instrument in ancient Roman religion by augurs to mark out a ritual space in the sky (a templum).

Ecclesiastical ring

episcopal ringringbishop's ring
Other typical insignia of many of these prelates are the mitre, the pectoral cross, and the episcopal ring.
In a decree of Pope Boniface IV (A.D. 610) it describes monks raised to the episcopal dignity as anulo pontificali subarrhatis, while at the Fourth Council of Toledo, in 633, it was stated that if a bishop has been deposed from his office and afterwards reinstated, he is to receive back stole, ring and crosier (orarium, anulum et baculum).

Staff of office

staffrodstaffs of office
Many other types of the staff of office were found in later periods, some continuing to the modern day in ceremonial contexts.
Church sidesmen bear sticks or rods or wands of office; bishops may use a crozier or crook.

Shepherd's crook

crookShepherd's hookcrook staff
In the Western Church the usual form has been a shepherd's crook, curved at the top to enable animals to be hooked.
For this reason the crook has been used as a religious symbol of care (particularly in difficult circumstances), including the Christian bishop's crosier.

Ecclesiastical heraldry

coat of armsbishopric coat of armsEcclesiastical Coat of Arms
The crosier is used in ecclesiastical heraldry to represent pastoral authority in the coats of arms of cardinals, bishops, abbots and abbesses.
Other insignia include the processional cross, and the episcopal mitre and crosier.

Vimpa

When the bishop is not holding the crosier, it is put in the care of an altar server, known as the "crosier bearer", who may wear around his shoulders a shawl-like veil called a vimpa, so as to hold the crosier without touching it with his bare hands.
A vimpa (plural: vimpae) is a veil or shawl worn over the shoulders of servers who carry the mitre and crosier during liturgical functions when they are not being used by the bishop, in the Roman Catholic, Anglican, and some other western churches.

Abbess

Mother SuperiorMotherReverend Mother
Although there is no provision for the presentation of a crosier in the liturgy associated with the blessing of an abbess, by long-standing custom an abbess may bear one when leading her community of nuns.
Unlike the abbot, the abbess receives only the ring, the crosier, and a copy of the rule of the order.

Blessing

blessedblessblesses
A bishop usually holds his crosier with his left hand, leaving his right hand free to bestow blessings.
A bishop does the same, except he uses both hands, or may hold the crozier in his left hand, using both to make the Sign of the Cross.

Papal ferula

pastoral staffferulaPapal ''ferula
Pope Paul VI introduced the modern papal pastoral staff, the papal ferula, in 1965.
It differs from a crosier, the staff carried by other bishops of Latin-rite churches, which is curved or bent at the top in the style of a shepherd's crook.

Altar server

altar boyaltar serversaltar boys
When the bishop is not holding the crosier, it is put in the care of an altar server, known as the "crosier bearer", who may wear around his shoulders a shawl-like veil called a vimpa, so as to hold the crosier without touching it with his bare hands.

Abbot

abbotsArchabbotabbacy
It is also presented to an abbot at his blessing, an ancient custom symbolizing his shepherding of the monastic community.
To distinguish abbots from bishops, it was ordained that their mitre should be made of less costly materials, and should not be ornamented with gold, a rule which was soon entirely disregarded, and that the crook of their pastoral staff (the crosier) should turn inwards instead of outwards, indicating that their jurisdiction was limited to their own house.

Veil

veilsveilingwedding veil
When the bishop is not holding the crosier, it is put in the care of an altar server, known as the "crosier bearer", who may wear around his shoulders a shawl-like veil called a vimpa, so as to hold the crosier without touching it with his bare hands.

Bishop

episcopateepiscopal consecrationbishops
The crosier is the symbol of the governing office of a bishop or Apostle.
Traditionally, a number of items are associated with the office of a bishop, most notably the mitre, crosier, and ecclesiastical ring.

Church of Cyprus

Cypriot Orthodox ChurchCyprusOrthodox Church of Cyprus
This is one of the Three Privileges granted to the Orthodox Church of Cyprus by Emperor Zeno (the other two being to sign his name in cinnabar—i.e., ink coloured vermilion by the addition of the mineral cinnabar—and to wear purple instead of black cassocks under his vestments).
Zeno confirmed the status of the Church of Cyprus and granted its Archbishop the "three privileges": namely to sign his name in an ink made vermilion by the addition of cinnabar; to wear tyrian purple instead of black robes under his vestments; and to hold an imperial sceptre (i.e. a gilt staff of silver, topped by a gold globus cruciger) instead of the regular episcopal crosier.

Pope

PapacypapalBishop of Rome
Popes carried a crosier at times in the first centuries of the church.

Cardinal (Catholic Church)

CardinalCardinal-Priestcardinal priest
The crosier is used in ecclesiastical heraldry to represent pastoral authority in the coats of arms of cardinals, bishops, abbots and abbesses.
A cardinal who is not a bishop is still entitled to wear and use the episcopal vestments and other pontificalia (episcopal regalia: mitre, crozier, zucchetto, pectoral cross and ring).

Hegumen

Igumenhegumenoshegoumenos
An Eastern archimandrite (high-ranking abbot), hegumen (abbot) or hegumenia (abbess) who leads a monastic community also bears a crosier.
A ruling hegumen is formally installed in a ceremony by the bishop, during which he is presented with his pastoral staff (Greek: paterissa, Slavonic: палица, palitza).

Syriac Orthodox Church

Syriac OrthodoxSyriac Orthodox Patriarch of Antioch and All the EastJacobite
The Armenian Apostolic Church uses both Eastern- and Western-style crosiers, while the Syriac Orthodox Church and Indian Orthodox Church have crosiers that are thicker than their Eastern counterparts.
They carry a crosier stylised with serpents representing the staff of Moses during sacraments.

Archimandrite

archmandriteArchimandritArchimandrites
An Eastern archimandrite (high-ranking abbot), hegumen (abbot) or hegumenia (abbess) who leads a monastic community also bears a crosier.
The duties of both a hegumen and an archimandrite are the same; however, during the Divine Service a hegumen wears a simple mantle, while the mantle of an archimandrite is decorated with sacral texts; an archimandrite also wears a mitre and bears a pastoral staff (pateritsa).

Sudarium

In previous times, a cloth of linen or richer material, called the sudarium (literally, "sweat cloth"), was suspended from the crosier at the place where the bishop would grasp it.

Papal cross

triple crosstriple-barred cross
It was often merely an artistic device, as use of a staff or crosier was not part of the traditional papal insignia.

Catholic Church

Roman CatholicCatholicRoman Catholic Church
A crosier (also known as a crozier, paterissa, pastoral staff, or bishop's staff) is a stylized staff carried by high-ranking Roman Catholic, Eastern Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican, and some Lutheran, United Methodist and Pentecostal prelates.

Eastern Catholic Churches

Eastern CatholicUniateEastern Catholic Church
A crosier (also known as a crozier, paterissa, pastoral staff, or bishop's staff) is a stylized staff carried by high-ranking Roman Catholic, Eastern Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican, and some Lutheran, United Methodist and Pentecostal prelates.

Eastern Orthodox Church

Eastern OrthodoxOrthodoxOrthodox Church
A crosier (also known as a crozier, paterissa, pastoral staff, or bishop's staff) is a stylized staff carried by high-ranking Roman Catholic, Eastern Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican, and some Lutheran, United Methodist and Pentecostal prelates.

Oriental Orthodox Churches

Oriental OrthodoxOriental OrthodoxyOriental Orthodox Church
A crosier (also known as a crozier, paterissa, pastoral staff, or bishop's staff) is a stylized staff carried by high-ranking Roman Catholic, Eastern Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican, and some Lutheran, United Methodist and Pentecostal prelates.