Crossbar switch

crossbarcross-bar switchcrossbar interconnectcrossbar switch fabriccrossbar switchingcrossbar switching equipmentcrossbar technologycrossbar telephone exchangecrosspoint switchcrosspoint switches
In electronics, a crossbar switch (cross-point switch, matrix switch) is a collection of switches arranged in a matrix configuration.wikipedia
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Electromechanics

electromechanicalelectro-mechanicalElectromechanical Engineering
A telephony crossbar switch is an electromechanical device for switching telephone calls.
Crossbar switches were first widely installed in the middle 20th century in Sweden, the United States, Canada, and Great Britain, and these quickly spread to the rest of the world.

Telephone exchange

exchangescentral officeexchange
A telephony crossbar switch is an electromechanical device for switching telephone calls.
Exchanges based on the Strowger switch were eventually challenged by other exchange types and later by crossbar technology.

Switch

switchestoggle switchcontact bounce
In electronics, a crossbar switch (cross-point switch, matrix switch) is a collection of switches arranged in a matrix configuration.
Early telephone systems used an automatically operated Strowger switch to connect telephone callers; telephone exchanges contain one or more crossbar switches today.

TXK

CrossbarTXK1TXK2
In the UK the Plessey Company produced a range of TXK crossbar exchanges, but their widespread rollout by the British Post Office began later than in other countries, and then was inhibited by the parallel development of TXE reed relay and electronic exchange systems, so they never achieved a large number of customer connections although they did find some success as tandem switch exchanges.
TXK (Telephone eXchange Crossbar) was a range of Crossbar exchanges used by the British Post Office telephone network, subsequently BT, between 1964 and 1994.

TXE

TXE1
In the UK the Plessey Company produced a range of TXK crossbar exchanges, but their widespread rollout by the British Post Office began later than in other countries, and then was inhibited by the parallel development of TXE reed relay and electronic exchange systems, so they never achieved a large number of customer connections although they did find some success as tandem switch exchanges.
In 1960 the situation rapidly changed when the Australian Postmaster-General's Department rejected a system from a consortium of British manufacturers who offered a register-controlled version of a motor-uniselector system in favour of a crossbar system from the Ericsson.

Ericsson

LM EricssonL. M. EricssonEriccson
In 1950, the Ericsson Swedish company developed their own versions of the 1XB and A204 systems for the international market.
Ericsson crossbar switching equipment was used in telephone administrations in many countries.

Crossover switch

The cross-point switch is one of the principal switch architectures, together with a rotary switch, memory switch, and a crossover switch.

Strowger switch

Strowgerstep-by-stepstep by step
Crossbar switching quickly spread to the rest of the world, replacing most earlier designs like the Strowger (step-by-step) and Panel systems in larger installations in the U.S. Graduating from entirely electromechanical control on introduction, they were gradually elaborated to have full electronic control and a variety of calling features including short-code and speed-dialing.
The Strowger system was widely used until the development of the more reliable crossbar switch, an electromechanical switch with a matrix of vertical and horizontal bars and simpler motions.

Reed relay

ferreedremreedCrossReed
In the UK the Plessey Company produced a range of TXK crossbar exchanges, but their widespread rollout by the British Post Office began later than in other countries, and then was inhibited by the parallel development of TXE reed relay and electronic exchange systems, so they never achieved a large number of customer connections although they did find some success as tandem switch exchanges.
Most reed relays in the crossbar switching systems of the 1940s through the 1970s were packaged in groups of five.

Western Electric

Western Electric CompanyWestrexWestern Electric Manufacturing Company
The first design of what is now called a crossbar switch was the Bell company Western Electric's coordinate selector of 1915.
Western Electric's switching equipment development commenced in the mid-1910s with the rotary system and the panel switch, later several generations of cross-bar switches, and finally the development of several generations of electronic switching systems (ESS).

Plessey

Plessey RadarPlessey CompanyPlessey Semiconductors Ltd
In the UK the Plessey Company produced a range of TXK crossbar exchanges, but their widespread rollout by the British Post Office began later than in other countries, and then was inhibited by the parallel development of TXE reed relay and electronic exchange systems, so they never achieved a large number of customer connections although they did find some success as tandem switch exchanges.
In 1961 Plessey merged with the British Ericsson Telephone company and the Automatic Telephone & Electric (AT&E) of Liverpool, to become Britain's largest manufacturer of telecommunications equipment, including the majority of the country's crossbar switches.

Class-4 telephone switch

tandem switchClass 4Class 4 telephone switch
In the UK the Plessey Company produced a range of TXK crossbar exchanges, but their widespread rollout by the British Post Office began later than in other countries, and then was inhibited by the parallel development of TXE reed relay and electronic exchange systems, so they never achieved a large number of customer connections although they did find some success as tandem switch exchanges.
The majority of class-4 switches in the Bell System during the 1950s and 1960s used crossbar switches, such as the Crossbar Tandem (XBT) variant of the Number One Crossbar Switching System, or 1XB switch.

Number Five Crossbar Switching System

5XB switchNo. 5 Crossbar switch5XB
Early crossbar exchanges were divided into an originating side and a terminating side, while the later and prominent Canadian and US SP1 switch and 5XB switch were not.
5XB was originally intended to bring the benefits of crossbar switching to towns and small cities with only a few thousand telephone lines.

Number One Crossbar Switching System

1XBNo. 1 Crossbar1XB switch
The system design used in AT&T Corporation's 1XB crossbar exchanges, which entered revenue service from 1938, developed by Bell Telephone Labs, was inspired by the Swedish design but was based on the rediscovered link principle.
Its switch fabric used the new electromechanical crossbar switch to implement the topology of the panel switching system of the 1920s.

Multiswitch

The special crossbar switches used in distributing satellite TV signals are called multiswitches.
*Crossbar switch - generic description of a switch connecting multiple inputs to multiple outputs in a matrix manner.

Switched fabric

switching fabricFibre Channel fabricfabric
The link principle was more efficient, but required a more complex control system to find idle links through the switching fabric.
Switched Fabric or switching fabric is a network topology in which network nodes interconnect via one or more network switches (particularly crossbar switches).

SP-1 switch

SP1SP1 switchSP1 4-Wire
Early crossbar exchanges were divided into an originating side and a terminating side, while the later and prominent Canadian and US SP1 switch and 5XB switch were not. The Northern Electric Minibar used in SP1 switch was similar but even smaller.
Like the previous generation of systems, the SP-1 was an analog switch that used a special form of mechanical relay (Minibar crossbar switch) to provide the voice connections.

Nonblocking minimal spanning switch

structure of a switch
The crossbar switch has the property of being able to connect N inputs to N outputs in any one-to-one combination, so it can connect any caller to any non-busy receiver, a property given the technical term "nonblocking".

Marker (telecommunications)

markermarkers
This meant common control, as described above: all the digits were recorded, then passed to the common control equipment, the marker, to establish the call at all the separate switch stages simultaneously.
After unfruitful German efforts in the 1920s, they were successfully developed at Bell Labs in the 1930s to support the then new generation of crossbar switches which were replacing the Step-by-Step switches and Panel switches of the first generation of automatic switching.

Wavefront arbiter

One approach for making these decisions quickly is through the use of a wavefront arbiter.
A crossbar is the central portion of a crossbar switch fabric which connects the inputs to the outputs.

Uniform memory access

UMAHeterogenous Unified Memory AccesshUMA
As computer technologies have improved, crossbar switches have found uses in systems such as the multistage interconnection networks that connect the various processing units in a uniform memory access parallel processor to the array of memory elements.

James Cunningham, Son and Company

James Cunningham, Son & CompanyJames Cunningham, Sons and Company
For instrumentation use, James Cunningham, Son and Company made high-speed, very-long-life crossbar switches with physically small mechanical parts which permitted faster operation than telephone-type crossbar switches.
The company made high-speed, very-long-life crossbar switches with physically small mechanical parts which permitted faster operation than telephone-type crossbar switches.

Electronics

electronicelectronic equipmentelectronic device
In electronics, a crossbar switch (cross-point switch, matrix switch) is a collection of switches arranged in a matrix configuration.

Rotary switch

rotaryrotary isolators
The cross-point switch is one of the principal switch architectures, together with a rotary switch, memory switch, and a crossover switch.

Telephony

digital telephonytelephonedigital
Crossbar switches are commonly used in information processing applications such as telephony and circuit switching, but they are also used in applications such as mechanical sorting machines.