Crustacean

Crustaceacrustaceanscarcinologycrustaceans.carcinologistCrustaeceashellfishbenthic crustaceansClass Crustaceacrustaceans,
Crustaceans (Crustacea ) form a large, diverse arthropod taxon which includes such familiar animals as crabs, lobsters, crayfish, shrimps, prawns, krill, woodlice, and barnacles.wikipedia
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Crab

Brachyuracrabstrue crab
Crustaceans (Crustacea ) form a large, diverse arthropod taxon which includes such familiar animals as crabs, lobsters, crayfish, shrimps, prawns, krill, woodlice, and barnacles.
Crabs are decapod crustaceans of the infraorder Brachyura, which typically have a very short projecting "tail" (abdomen) (βραχύς = short, οὐρά / οura = tail ), usually entirely hidden under the thorax.

Lobster

lobstersNephropidaeClawed lobster
Crustaceans (Crustacea ) form a large, diverse arthropod taxon which includes such familiar animals as crabs, lobsters, crayfish, shrimps, prawns, krill, woodlice, and barnacles.
Lobsters are a family (Nephropidae, sometimes also Homeridae) of large marine crustaceans.

Arthropod

ArthropodaarthropodsEuarthropoda
Crustaceans (Crustacea ) form a large, diverse arthropod taxon which includes such familiar animals as crabs, lobsters, crayfish, shrimps, prawns, krill, woodlice, and barnacles. Like other arthropods, crustaceans have an exoskeleton, which they moult to grow.
Arthropods form the phylum Euarthropoda, which includes insects, arachnids, myriapods, and crustaceans.

Krill

euphausiidEuphausiaceaEuphausiidae
Crustaceans (Crustacea ) form a large, diverse arthropod taxon which includes such familiar animals as crabs, lobsters, crayfish, shrimps, prawns, krill, woodlice, and barnacles.
Krill are small crustaceans of the order Euphausiacea, and are found in all the world's oceans.

Woodlouse

woodliceOniscideasowbug
Crustaceans (Crustacea ) form a large, diverse arthropod taxon which includes such familiar animals as crabs, lobsters, crayfish, shrimps, prawns, krill, woodlice, and barnacles. Most crustaceans are free-living aquatic animals, but some are terrestrial (e.g. woodlice), some are parasitic (e.g. Rhizocephala, fish lice, tongue worms) and some are sessile (e.g. barnacles).
A woodlouse (plural woodlice) is a crustacean from the monophyletic suborder Oniscidea within the isopods.

Barnacle

barnaclesCirripediacyprid
Crustaceans (Crustacea ) form a large, diverse arthropod taxon which includes such familiar animals as crabs, lobsters, crayfish, shrimps, prawns, krill, woodlice, and barnacles. Most crustaceans are free-living aquatic animals, but some are terrestrial (e.g. woodlice), some are parasitic (e.g. Rhizocephala, fish lice, tongue worms) and some are sessile (e.g. barnacles).
A barnacle is a type of arthropod constituting the infraclass Cirripedia in the subphylum Crustacea, and is hence related to crabs and lobsters.

Prawn

prawnsking prawnking prawns
Crustaceans (Crustacea ) form a large, diverse arthropod taxon which includes such familiar animals as crabs, lobsters, crayfish, shrimps, prawns, krill, woodlice, and barnacles.
Prawn is a common name for small aquatic crustaceans with an exoskeleton and ten legs (i.e. a member of the order decapoda), some of which can be eaten.

Pancrustacea

Tetraconata
The crustacean group is usually treated as a class under subphylum Mandibulata and because of recent molecular studies it is now well accepted that the crustacean group is paraphyletic, and comprises all animals in the Pancrustacea clade other than hexapods.
Pancrustacea is a clade, comprising all crustaceans and hexapods.

Insect

Insectainsectsbugs
Some crustaceans are more closely related to insects and other hexapods than they are to certain other crustaceans. They are distinguished from other groups of arthropods, such as insects, myriapods and chelicerates, by the possession of biramous (two-parted) limbs, and by their larval forms, such as the nauplius stage of branchiopods and copepods.
Insects may be found in nearly all environments, although only a small number of species reside in the oceans, which are dominated by another arthropod group, crustaceans.

Stygotantulus

Stygotantulus stocki
The 67,000 described species range in size from Stygotantulus stocki at 0.1 mm, to the Japanese spider crab with a leg span of up to 3.8 m and a mass of 20 kg.
Stygotantulus is a genus of crustacean with the sole species Stygotantulus stocki, that lives as an ectoparasite on harpacticoid copepods of the families Tisbidae and Canuellidae.

Copepod

copepodsCopepodaNeocopepoda
They are distinguished from other groups of arthropods, such as insects, myriapods and chelicerates, by the possession of biramous (two-parted) limbs, and by their larval forms, such as the nauplius stage of branchiopods and copepods.
Copepods (meaning "oar-feet") are a group of small crustaceans found in nearly every freshwater and saltwater habitat.

Exoskeleton

shellshellsexoskeletal
Like other arthropods, crustaceans have an exoskeleton, which they moult to grow.
Examples of animals with exoskeletons include insects such as grasshoppers and cockroaches, and crustaceans such as crabs and lobsters, as well as the shells of certain sponges and the various groups of shelled molluscs, including those of snails, clams, tusk shells, chitons and nautilus.

Argulidae

ArguloidaArgulusfish lice
Most crustaceans are free-living aquatic animals, but some are terrestrial (e.g. woodlice), some are parasitic (e.g. Rhizocephala, fish lice, tongue worms) and some are sessile (e.g. barnacles).
The family Argulidae contains the carp lice or fish lice – a group of parasitic crustaceans of uncertain position within the Maxillopoda.

Pentastomida

pentastomidtongue wormstongue worm
Most crustaceans are free-living aquatic animals, but some are terrestrial (e.g. woodlice), some are parasitic (e.g. Rhizocephala, fish lice, tongue worms) and some are sessile (e.g. barnacles).
The Pentastomida are an enigmatic group of parasitic crustaceans commonly known as tongue worms due to the resemblance of the species of the genus Linguatula to a vertebrate tongue.

Rhizocephala

rhizocephalid
Most crustaceans are free-living aquatic animals, but some are terrestrial (e.g. woodlice), some are parasitic (e.g. Rhizocephala, fish lice, tongue worms) and some are sessile (e.g. barnacles).
Rhizocephala are derived barnacles that parasitise mostly decapod crustaceans, but can also infest Peracarida, mantis shrimps and thoracican barnacles, and are found from the deep ocean to freshwater.

Shrimp

shrimpsshrimp and prawnCamarón
Crustaceans (Crustacea ) form a large, diverse arthropod taxon which includes such familiar animals as crabs, lobsters, crayfish, shrimps, prawns, krill, woodlice, and barnacles.
The term shrimp is used to refer to some decapod crustaceans, although the exact animals covered can vary.

Mandibulata

mandibulatemandibulate arthropodsmandibulates
The crustacean group is usually treated as a class under subphylum Mandibulata and because of recent molecular studies it is now well accepted that the crustacean group is paraphyletic, and comprises all animals in the Pancrustacea clade other than hexapods.
Mandibulata, termed "mandibulates", is a clade of arthropods that comprises the extant subphyla Myriapoda (millipedes and others), Crustacea and Hexapoda (insects and others).

Carcinology

carcinologistcrustaceologycarcinologists
The scientific study of crustaceans is known as carcinology (alternatively, malacostracology, crustaceology or crustalogy), and a scientist who works in carcinology is a carcinologist.
Carcinology is a branch of zoology that consists of the study of crustaceans, a group of arthropods that includes lobsters, crayfish, shrimp, krill, barnacles and crabs.

Paraphyly

paraphyleticembedded*
The crustacean group is usually treated as a class under subphylum Mandibulata and because of recent molecular studies it is now well accepted that the crustacean group is paraphyletic, and comprises all animals in the Pancrustacea clade other than hexapods.
Crustaceans are not a clade because the Hexapoda (insects) are excluded.

Mandible (arthropod mouthpart)

mandiblesmandibleMandible (arthropod)
Each somite, or body segment can bear a pair of appendages: on the segments of the head, these include two pairs of antennae, the mandibles and maxillae; the thoracic segments bear legs, which may be specialised as pereiopods (walking legs) and maxillipeds (feeding legs).
Mandibles are present in the extant subphyla Myriapoda (millipedes and others), Crustacea and Hexapoda (insects etc.).

Carapace

cephalic shieldcarapacesshell
The head and thorax may be fused together to form a cephalothorax, which may be covered by a single large carapace.
A carapace is a dorsal (upper) section of the exoskeleton or shell in a number of animal groups, including arthropods, such as crustaceans and arachnids, as well as vertebrates, such as turtles and tortoises.

Decapoda

decapoddecapodsdecapod crustaceans
In many decapods, the first (and sometimes the second) pair of pleopods are specialised in the male for sperm transfer.
The Decapoda or decapods (literally "ten-footed") are an order of crustaceans within the class Malacostraca, including many familiar groups, such as crayfish, crabs, lobsters, prawns, and shrimp.

Decapod anatomy

pereiopodpleopodpleon
Each somite, or body segment can bear a pair of appendages: on the segments of the head, these include two pairs of antennae, the mandibles and maxillae; the thoracic segments bear legs, which may be specialised as pereiopods (walking legs) and maxillipeds (feeding legs).
The decapod crustacean, such as a crab, lobster, shrimp or prawn, is made up of 20 body segments grouped into two main body parts, the cephalothorax and the pleon (abdomen).

Hexapoda

hexapodshexapodinsect-like
The crustacean group is usually treated as a class under subphylum Mandibulata and because of recent molecular studies it is now well accepted that the crustacean group is paraphyletic, and comprises all animals in the Pancrustacea clade other than hexapods.
Similar appendages are found on the heads of Myriapoda and Crustacea, although these have secondary antennae.

Antenna (biology)

antennaeantennaantennal
Each somite, or body segment can bear a pair of appendages: on the segments of the head, these include two pairs of antennae, the mandibles and maxillae; the thoracic segments bear legs, which may be specialised as pereiopods (walking legs) and maxillipeds (feeding legs).
The common ancestor of all arthropods likely had one pair of uniramous (unbranched) antenna-like structures, followed by one or more pairs of biramous (having two major branches) leg-like structures, as seen in some modern crustaceans and fossil trilobites.