Cruwys Morchard

PennymoorWay VillageCruwys''' Morchard
Cruwys Morchard is an ecclesiastical and civil parish in the Mid Devon district of the county of Devon in England.wikipedia
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Nomansland, Devon

Nomansland
The parish covers about 5765 acre of land, and comprises a number of scattered houses and farms, and three small hamlets, Pennymoor, Way Village and Nomansland.
It is so named because it was at one time a remote extra-parochial area where the Parishes of Witheridge, Thelbridge and Cruwys Morchard met (as they still do, but Nomansland is no longer extra-parochial).

Cruwys (disambiguation)

Cruwys
The parish takes its name from the Cruwys family who have been Lords of the Manor here since the reign of King John (1199–1216).

Robert Cruwys

Cruwys
He was born in the family manor, Cruwys Morchard House, located in Cruwys Morchard, a small parish in Devon which takes the name from the Cruwys family who have been Lords of the Manor here since the reign of King John (1199–1216).

Margaret Cruwys

Margaret Campbell Speke CruwysMargaret Abercrombie
She married Lewis George Cruwys of Cruwys Morchard, Devon, on 19 November 1917 at St David's Church, Exeter.

Civil parish

parishcivil parishesancient parish
Cruwys Morchard is an ecclesiastical and civil parish in the Mid Devon district of the county of Devon in England.

Mid Devon

TivertonMid Devon District CouncilMid-Devon
Cruwys Morchard is an ecclesiastical and civil parish in the Mid Devon district of the county of Devon in England.

Devon

DevonshireDevon, EnglandCounty of Devon
Cruwys Morchard is an ecclesiastical and civil parish in the Mid Devon district of the county of Devon in England.

Tiverton, Devon

TivertonTiverton branch Tiverton
It is located about four to five miles west of Tiverton along the road to Witheridge.

Witheridge

It is located about four to five miles west of Tiverton along the road to Witheridge.

John, King of England

King JohnJohnJohn of England
The parish takes its name from the Cruwys family who have been Lords of the Manor here since the reign of King John (1199–1216).

Domesday Book

Domesday SurveyDomesdayDoomsday Book
The manor of Morceth is mentioned twice in the Domesday book of 1086, with part being held in-chief by William Cheever, the 35th of his 46 Devonshire holdings, and part being held in-chief by Geoffrey de Montbray, Bishop of Coutances, the 73rd of his 99 Devonshire holdings.

Tenant-in-chief

tenants-in-chieflandholdertenencia
The manor of Morceth is mentioned twice in the Domesday book of 1086, with part being held in-chief by William Cheever, the 35th of his 46 Devonshire holdings, and part being held in-chief by Geoffrey de Montbray, Bishop of Coutances, the 73rd of his 99 Devonshire holdings.

William Cheever

William CapraWilliam Cheever, alias Chièvre
The manor of Morceth is mentioned twice in the Domesday book of 1086, with part being held in-chief by William Cheever, the 35th of his 46 Devonshire holdings, and part being held in-chief by Geoffrey de Montbray, Bishop of Coutances, the 73rd of his 99 Devonshire holdings.

Geoffrey de Montbray

Geoffrey de MowbrayGeoffrey de Montbray, bishop of CoutancesGeoffrey of Coutances
The manor of Morceth is mentioned twice in the Domesday book of 1086, with part being held in-chief by William Cheever, the 35th of his 46 Devonshire holdings, and part being held in-chief by Geoffrey de Montbray, Bishop of Coutances, the 73rd of his 99 Devonshire holdings.

Roman Catholic Diocese of Coutances

Bishop of CoutancesBishop of AvranchesDiocese of Coutances
The manor of Morceth is mentioned twice in the Domesday book of 1086, with part being held in-chief by William Cheever, the 35th of his 46 Devonshire holdings, and part being held in-chief by Geoffrey de Montbray, Bishop of Coutances, the 73rd of his 99 Devonshire holdings.

Feudal barony of Bradninch

feudal baron of Bradninch
William Cheever's lands later formed the feudal barony of Bradninch from which Cruwys Morchard was later held by the Cruwys family.

Spire

spiresRhenish helmbroach-spire
The Church of the Holy Cross was built in 1529 with a spire on top of the church tower.

Lightning

lightning boltlightning strikelightning strikes
This, however, was struck by lightning in 1689, and the consequent major fire, which melted the bells, necessitated the rebuilding of the top stage of the tower in brick.

Church bell

Sanctus bellbellsbell
This, however, was struck by lightning in 1689, and the consequent major fire, which melted the bells, necessitated the rebuilding of the top stage of the tower in brick.

Coat of arms

armscoats of armscoat-of-arms
It also destroyed painted windows which bore the arms of the Cruwys family.

Oliver Cromwell

CromwellCromwellianOliver
There was also a chapel belonging to Cruwys Morchard House which was the burial place of the Cruwys family, but the chapel was destroyed by Oliver Cromwell, and it is believed that many family monuments were destroyed at the same time.