Crux

Southern CrossSouthern Cross constellationconstellationCruThe Southern Cross(Southern) CrossCrucisCrux AustralisCrux ResearchCruzeiro do Sul
Crux is a constellation located in the southern sky in a bright portion of the Milky Way.wikipedia
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Asterism (astronomy)

asterismasterismsconstellation
Its name is Latin for cross, and it is dominated by a cross-shaped or kite-like asterism that is commonly known as the Southern Cross.
Another is the asterism of the Southern Cross, whose recognised constellation is Crux (crux is an area of the night sky in which the Southern Cross is located).

Beta Crucis

β CrucisMimosaβ Cru
Crux is followed by four dominant stars, descending in clockwise order by magnitude: Beta, Gamma (one of the closest red giants to Earth), Delta and Epsilon Crucis.
Beta Crucis (Latinised from β Crucis, abbreviated Beta Cru, β Cru), also called Mimosa, is a binary star system; the second-brightest object in the constellation of Crux (after α Crucis or Acrux) and the 19th-brightest star in the night sky.

Delta Crucis

δ Cruδ CrucisDelta
Crux is followed by four dominant stars, descending in clockwise order by magnitude: Beta, Gamma (one of the closest red giants to Earth), Delta and Epsilon Crucis.
Delta Crucis (δ Cru, δ Crucis) is a star in the southern circumpolar constellation of Crux.

Epsilon Crucis

ε CruGinanε Crucis
Crux is followed by four dominant stars, descending in clockwise order by magnitude: Beta, Gamma (one of the closest red giants to Earth), Delta and Epsilon Crucis.
Epsilon Crucis (ε Crucis, abbreviated Eps Cru, ε Cru), also named Ginan, is a single, orange-hued star in the southern constellation of Crux.

Jewel Box (star cluster)

Jewel Box4755Kappa Crucis Cluster
Crux also contains the bright and colourful open cluster known as the Jewel Box (NGC 4755) and, to the southwest, partly includes the extensive dark nebula, known as the Coalsack Nebula.
The Jewel Box (Kappa Crucis Cluster or NGC 4755) is an open cluster in the constellation Crux, originally discovered by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille in 1751–1752.

Milky Way

galaxyMilky Way Galaxyour galaxy
Crux is a constellation located in the southern sky in a bright portion of the Milky Way. Many of these brighter stars are members of the Scorpius–Centaurus Association, a large but loose group of hot blue-white stars that appear to share common origins and motion across the southern Milky Way.
Relative to the celestial equator, it passes as far north as the constellation of Cassiopeia and as far south as the constellation of Crux, indicating the high inclination of Earth's equatorial plane and the plane of the ecliptic, relative to the galactic plane.

João Faras

Historians generally credit João Faras for being the first European to depict it correctly.
Mestre João Faras, better known simply as Mestre João ('Master John"), was an astrologer, astronomer, physician and surgeon of King Manuel I of Portugal who accompanied Pedro Álvares Cabral in the discovery of Brazil in 1500, and wrote a famous letter identifying the Southern Cross constellation.

Coalsack Nebula

Coalsack
Crux also contains the bright and colourful open cluster known as the Jewel Box (NGC 4755) and, to the southwest, partly includes the extensive dark nebula, known as the Coalsack Nebula.
It is located at a distance of approximately 600 light-years away from Earth, in the constellation Crux.

Centaurus

Cena picture of himselfCentaur
Crux is bordered by the constellations Centaurus (which surrounds it on three sides) on the east, north and west, and Musca to the south.
Its alpha and beta stars are used as "pointer stars" to help observers find the constellation Crux.

IAU designated constellations

88 modern constellationsModern constellationsmodern constellation
It is among the most easily distinguished constellations, as all of its four main stars have an apparent visual magnitude brighter than +2.8, even though it is the smallest of all 88 modern constellations.

Scorpius–Centaurus Association

Scorpius-CentaurusScorpius-Centaurus OB associationUpper Scorpius
Many of these brighter stars are members of the Scorpius–Centaurus Association, a large but loose group of hot blue-white stars that appear to share common origins and motion across the southern Milky Way.
Many of the bright stars in the constellations Scorpius, Lupus, Centaurus, and Crux are members of the Sco–Cen association, including Antares (the most massive member of Upper Scorpius), and most of the stars in the Southern Cross.

Alpha Crucis

Acruxα Crucisα Cru
Predominating is the first-magnitude blue-white star of Alpha Crucis or Acrux, being the constellation's brightest and most southerly member.
Alpha Crucis (Latinised from α Crucis, abbreviated Alpha Cru, α Cru) is a multiple star system 321 light-years from the Sun in the constellation of Crux and part of the asterism known as the Southern Cross.

Alvise Cadamosto

Ca' de MostoCadamostoCadamosto. Alvise
The 15th century Venetian navigator Alvise Cadamosto made note of what was probably the Southern Cross on exiting the Gambia River in 1455, calling it the carro dell'ostro ("southern chariot").
At the mouth of the Gambia, Cadamosto made a note of the near-disappearance of the northern Pole Star on the horizon, and roughly sketched a bright constellation to the south, believed to be the first known depiction of the Southern Cross constellation (albeit wrongly positioned and with too many stars – a more accurate rendition would have to wait until Mestre João Faras in 1500.) Cadamosto called it the carro dell' ostro (southern chariot).

Emery Molyneux

MolyneuxMolyneux's globesMolyneux, Emery
Emery Molyneux and Petrus Plancius have also been cited as the first uranographers (sky mappers) to distinguish Crux as a separate constellation; their representations date from 1592, the former depicting it on his celestial globe and the latter in one of the small celestial maps on his large wall map.
To the constellations featured on Mercator's globe, Molyneux added the Southern Cross and Southern Triangle, though somewhat to the west of their true positions.

Gamma Crucis

γ Cruγ CrucisGacrux
Crux is followed by four dominant stars, descending in clockwise order by magnitude: Beta, Gamma (one of the closest red giants to Earth), Delta and Epsilon Crucis.
With an apparent visual magnitude of +1.63, this is the third-brightest star in the southern constellation of Crux, the Southern Cross, and one of the brightest stars in the night sky.

Petrus Plancius

PlanciusP. Plancius
Emery Molyneux and Petrus Plancius have also been cited as the first uranographers (sky mappers) to distinguish Crux as a separate constellation; their representations date from 1592, the former depicting it on his celestial globe and the latter in one of the small celestial maps on his large wall map.
In 1589 Plancius collaborated with the Amsterdam cartographer Jacob Floris van Langren on a 32.5-cm celestial globe, which, using the sparse information available about southern celestial features, for the first time depicted: Crux the southern cross, Triangulum Australe the southern triangle, and the Magellanic Clouds, Nubecula Major and Minor.

Musca

ApisMusMusca Australis
Crux is bordered by the constellations Centaurus (which surrounds it on three sides) on the east, north and west, and Musca to the south.
Musca is bordered by Crux to the north, Carina to the west, Chamaeleon to the south, Apus and Circinus to the east, and Centaurus to the northeast.

Classical Cepheid variable

classical Cepheidδ Cep variableclassical Cepheids
The constellation contains four Cepheid variables that are each visible to the naked eye under optimum conditions.

Vela (constellation)

VelaFalse Crossconstellation Vela
Crux is sometimes confused with the nearby False Cross by stargazers.
Together with Kappa Velorum or Markeb, Iota Carinae or Aspidiske and Epsilon Carinae or Avior, it forms the diamond-shaped asterism known as the False Cross—so called because it is sometimes mistaken for the Southern Cross, causing errors in astronavigation.

Binary star

spectroscopic binaryeclipsing binarybinary
Iota Crucis is a binary star 125 light-years from Earth.
The bright southern star Acrux, in the Southern Cross, was discovered to be double by Father Fontenay in 1685.

HD 106906 b

b
The star HD 106906 has been found to have a planet—HD 106906 b—that has a larger orbit than any other exoplanet discovered to date.
HD 106906 b is a directly imaged planetary-mass companion and candidate exoplanet orbiting the star HD 106906, in the constellation Crux at about 300 light-years from Earth.

Flag of Brazil

Brazilian flagnational flagBrazil
The four or five brightest stars of Crux appear, heraldically standardised in various ways, on the flags of Australia, Brazil, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea and Samoa.
The flag of Brazil (Bandeira do Brasil), known in Portuguese as A Auriverde (The Yellow-and-green One), is a blue disc depicting a starry sky (which includes the Southern Cross) spanned by a curved band inscribed with the national motto "Ordem e Progresso" ("Order and Progress"), within a yellow rhombus, on a green field.

Flag of Australia

Australian flagAustraliaAustralian National Flag
The four or five brightest stars of Crux appear, heraldically standardised in various ways, on the flags of Australia, Brazil, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea and Samoa.
The fly contains a representation of the Southern Cross constellation, made up of five white stars – one small five-pointed star and four, larger, seven-pointed stars.

Flag of New Zealand

New ZealandNew Zealand flagnational flag
The four or five brightest stars of Crux appear, heraldically standardised in various ways, on the flags of Australia, Brazil, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea and Samoa.
The stars' pattern represents the asterism within the constellation of Crux, the Southern Cross.

Lambda Crucis

λ CruLambda
Other members include the blue-white stars Zeta, Lambda, Mu 1 and Mu 2.
Lambda Crucis (λ Crucis / λ Cru) is a star in the southern constellation Crux.