A report on Cryovolcano and Sotra Patera

Doom Mons, one of the most reliably identified cryovolcanoes on Saturn's moon Titan
Stereoscopic map of Sotra Patera and Doom Mons. Height is exaggerated by a factor of 10. The colours are false.
Plumes of Enceladus, feeding Saturn's E Ring, seem to arise from the "Tiger Stripes" near the south pole.
Global view of Titan showing the location of Sotra Patera

It is a possible cryovolcanic caldera 30 km across and 1.7 km deep, and is immediately to the east of the largest putative cryovolcanic mountain on Titan, the 1.45 km high Doom Mons.

- Sotra Patera

Cassini has observed several features thought to be cryovolcanoes on Titan, notably Doom Mons with adjacent Sotra Patera, a feature regarded as "the very best evidence, by far, for volcanic topography anywhere documented on an icy satellite."

- Cryovolcano
Doom Mons, one of the most reliably identified cryovolcanoes on Saturn's moon Titan

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Overall

Pictured in 2012 in natural color. The thick atmosphere is orange due to a dense haze.

Titan (moon)

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Largest moon of Saturn and the second-largest natural satellite in the Solar System.

Largest moon of Saturn and the second-largest natural satellite in the Solar System.

Pictured in 2012 in natural color. The thick atmosphere is orange due to a dense haze.
Christiaan Huygens discovered Titan in 1655.
Titan's orbit (highlighted in red) among the other large inner moons of Saturn. The moons outside its orbit are (from the outside to the inside) Iapetus and Hyperion; those inside are Rhea, Dione, Tethys, Enceladus, and Mimas.
True-color image of layers of haze in Titan's atmosphere
Trace organic gases in Titan's atmosphere—HNC (left) and HC3N (right).
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Methane clouds (animated; July 2014).
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False-color Cassini radar mosaic of Titan's north polar region. Blue coloring indicates low radar reflectivity, caused by hydrocarbon seas, lakes and tributary networks filled with liquid ethane, methane and dissolved . About half of the large body at lower left, Kraken Mare, is shown. Ligeia Mare is at lower right.
Mosaic of three Huygens images of channel system on Titan
Rimmed lakes of Titan (artist concept)
Near-infrared radiation from the Sun reflecting off Titan's hydrocarbon seas
Radar image of a 139 km-diameter impact crater on Titan's surface, showing a smooth floor, rugged rim, and possibly a central peak.
Ligeia Mare – SAR and clearer despeckled views.
Near-infrared image of Tortola Facula, thought to be a possible cryovolcano
False-color VIMS image of the possible cryovolcano Sotra Patera, combined with a 3D map based on radar data, showing 1000-meter-high peaks and a 1500-meter-deep crater.
Sand dunes in the Namib Desert on Earth (top), compared with dunes in Belet on Titan
Titan - three dust storms detected in 2009–2010.
Voyager 1 view of haze on Titan's limb (1980)
Cassini's Titan flyby radio signal studies (artist's concept)
The balloon proposed for the Titan Saturn System Mission (artistic rendition)
Global map of Titan – with IAU labels (August 2016).
Titan – infrared views (2004–2017)
Titan's North Pole (2014)
Titan's South Pole (2014)

The geologically young surface is generally smooth, with few impact craters, although mountains and several possible cryovolcanoes have been found.

Named Sotra Patera, it is one in a chain of at least three mountains, each between 1000 and 1500 m in height, several of which are topped by large craters.

Doom Mons with collapse feature Sotra Patera and flow feature Mohini Fluctus, the latter partially covered by dunes. Radar image by Cassini, 2007

Doom Mons

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Name of a mountain range and its eponymous peak on Titan, the largest moon of Saturn.

Name of a mountain range and its eponymous peak on Titan, the largest moon of Saturn.

Doom Mons with collapse feature Sotra Patera and flow feature Mohini Fluctus, the latter partially covered by dunes. Radar image by Cassini, 2007

A putative cryovolcano, it is the largest mountain range on Titan by volume, and at 4757 ft one of the highest in the Solar System.

It is located within the Aztlan darklands region, possibly connected to the wider Shangri-La dark region, and is adjacent to Sotra Patera, a possible cryovolcanic caldera 1.7 km deep.