Curate

curacycuraciesassistant curatepastorassociate pastorcuréassistant pastorparochial vicarassistant priestcurates
A curate is a person who is invested with the care or cure (cura) of souls of a parish.wikipedia
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Parish

ecclesiastical parishparishesparishioner
A curate is a person who is invested with the care or cure (cura) of souls of a parish.
A parish is under the pastoral care and clerical jurisdiction of a parish priest, who might be assisted by one or more curates, and who operates from a parish church.

Parish in the Catholic Church

parishpastoralparishes
The parish priest (or often, in the United States, the "pastor" or "minister") is the priest who has canonical responsibility for the parish.
Globally they may be known as assistant priests, parochial vicars or curates.

Perpetual curate

perpetual curacyperpetual curaciesperpetual curracy
The technical term "curate", as found in the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, meant the incumbent of a benefice, that is the person licensed by the diocesan bishop to the "cure of souls", who, depending on how the benefice income was raised and distributed, was a rector, a vicar, or a perpetual curate.
Perpetual curate was a class of resident parish priest or incumbent curate within the United Church of England and Ireland (name of the combined Anglican churches of England and Ireland from 1800 to 1871).

Vicar (Anglicanism)

vicarTeam Vicarvicarage
The technical term "curate", as found in the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, meant the incumbent of a benefice, that is the person licensed by the diocesan bishop to the "cure of souls", who, depending on how the benefice income was raised and distributed, was a rector, a vicar, or a perpetual curate.
Other clergy—perhaps part time stipendiary or non-stipendiary—and those in training positions are formally assistant curates and are often known as team curate or, for instance, associate priest.

Church of England

AnglicanChurchC of E
In the Church of England today, "curate" refers to priests (or, in the first year, transitional deacons) who are in their first post after ordination (usually for four years), and are completing their training (not unlike an apprenticeship).
Curates (assistant clergy) are appointed by rectors and vicars, or if priests-in-charge by the bishop after consultation with the patron.

Evangelicalism

evangelicalevangelical ChristianEvangelicals
In Anglican parishes with a charismatic or evangelical (low church) tradition, the roles of curates are usually seen as being an assistant leader to the overall leader, often in a larger team of pastoral leaders.
Sometime later, Daniel Rowland, the Anglican curate of Llangeitho, Wales, experienced conversion as well.

Curate's egg

curate's-egg
In May 1895, the satirical British magazine Judy published a cartoon by an artist named Wilkerson, showing a timid curate and a fierce-looking bishop at breakfast in the bishop's house.

Priest

priesthoodparish priestpriests
In the Catholic Church, the English word "curate" is used for a priest assigned to a parish in a position subordinate to that of the parish priest. Clergy (both transitional deacons and priests) who assist the "curate" were, and are, properly called assistant curates, but are often referred to as "the curate".
In most (though not all) cases an assistant priest has the legal status of assistant curate, although not all assistant curates are priests, as this legal status also applies to many deacons working as assistants in a parochial setting.

Minor canon

priest vicarPriest-Vicarassistant priest vicar
Minor canons are those clergy who are members of a cathedral's establishment and take part in the daily services but are not part of the formal chapter.
They are sometimes, but not exclusively, more junior clergy, often chosen for their singing ability, who have already served a curacy, normally in a parish church.

Pastoral care

pastoralcure of soulscure
A curate is a person who is invested with the care or cure (cura) of souls of a parish.

Latin

Curator

museum curatormuseum directorcurators
The term is derived from the Latin curatus (compare Curator).

French language

FrenchfrancophoneFrench-language
In French, the curé is the chief priest of a parish, as is the Italian curato, the Spanish cura, and the Filipino term kura paróko (which almost always refers to the parish priest), which is derived from Spanish.

Italian language

ItalianItalian-languageit
In French, the curé is the chief priest of a parish, as is the Italian curato, the Spanish cura, and the Filipino term kura paróko (which almost always refers to the parish priest), which is derived from Spanish.

Spanish language

SpanishSpanish-languageCastilian
In French, the curé is the chief priest of a parish, as is the Italian curato, the Spanish cura, and the Filipino term kura paróko (which almost always refers to the parish priest), which is derived from Spanish.

Filipino language

FilipinoTagalogSpoken languages
In French, the curé is the chief priest of a parish, as is the Italian curato, the Spanish cura, and the Filipino term kura paróko (which almost always refers to the parish priest), which is derived from Spanish.

Catholic Church

Roman CatholicCatholicRoman Catholic Church
In the Catholic Church, the English word "curate" is used for a priest assigned to a parish in a position subordinate to that of the parish priest.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
In the Catholic Church, the English word "curate" is used for a priest assigned to a parish in a position subordinate to that of the parish priest.

Canon law

canonecclesiastical lawcanons
The parish priest (or often, in the United States, the "pastor" or "minister") is the priest who has canonical responsibility for the parish.

Apprenticeship

apprenticeapprenticedapprenticeships
In the Church of England today, "curate" refers to priests (or, in the first year, transitional deacons) who are in their first post after ordination (usually for four years), and are completing their training (not unlike an apprenticeship).

Book of Common Prayer

Prayer BookThe Book of Common Prayer1662 Book of Common Prayer
The technical term "curate", as found in the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, meant the incumbent of a benefice, that is the person licensed by the diocesan bishop to the "cure of souls", who, depending on how the benefice income was raised and distributed, was a rector, a vicar, or a perpetual curate.

Incumbent

inc.incumbencyreelection
The technical term "curate", as found in the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, meant the incumbent of a benefice, that is the person licensed by the diocesan bishop to the "cure of souls", who, depending on how the benefice income was raised and distributed, was a rector, a vicar, or a perpetual curate.

Rector (ecclesiastical)

rectorTeam Rectorrectory
The technical term "curate", as found in the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, meant the incumbent of a benefice, that is the person licensed by the diocesan bishop to the "cure of souls", who, depending on how the benefice income was raised and distributed, was a rector, a vicar, or a perpetual curate.

Deacon

diaconatedeaconspermanent diaconate
Clergy (both transitional deacons and priests) who assist the "curate" were, and are, properly called assistant curates, but are often referred to as "the curate".

Trent, Dorset

TrentTrent, SomersetThe Trent Estate
For example, Geoffrey Francis Fisher served as Curate of Trent near Sherborne after retiring as Archbishop of Canterbury in 1961.