An aerial view of March ARB in 2015
An aerial view of March ARB in 2015
Lieutenant Curtis LeMay in 1929
The control tower at March (demolished in 2015)
In 1938, three B-17s (one navigated by Lt. LeMay) intercept the Italian liner SS Rex 620 nm at sea
The old and new control tower at March
Colonel Curtis LeMay officially congratulates a bomber crew of the 306th Bomb Group in front of their B-17 Flying Fortress at Chelveston Airfield, England, June 2, 1943.
A Curtiss JN-4 "Jenny" on a training flight during World War I. This is the type of aircraft used at March Field during this era for basic pilot training of military pilots.
LeMay became known for his massive incendiary attacks against Japanese cities during the war using hundreds of planes flying at low altitudes. In this picture, B-29 bombers are shown dropping hundreds of incendiary bombs (cluster bombs, magnesium bombs, white phosphorus bombs, and napalm) on Yokohama during a strategic bombing raid on May 29, 1945.
Boeing P-26A Peashooters of the 17th Pursuit Group, 18 February 1935. 33–102 sits in the foreground. These aircraft were later sent to the 1st Pursuit Squadron/Group of Philippine Air Force in 1937.
Major General Curtis LeMay talking with General Joseph W. Stilwell
Oblique aerial photo of March Field, taken in March 1932 looking southeast to northwest
A "LeMay Bombing Leaflet" from the war, which warned Japanese civilians of impending danger: "Unfortunately, bombs have no eyes. So, in accordance with America's humanitarian policies, the American Air Force, which does not wish to injure innocent people, now gives you warning to evacuate the cities named and save your lives".
The first JATO take-off, by an ERCO Ercoupe fitted with a GALCIT booster, in 1941, performed at March Field
Major General Curtis LeMay with General of the Air Force Henry H. Arnold and Lieutenant General Barney M. Giles and Brigadier General Emmett O. Donnell
World War II March Field Postcard
General Curtis E. LeMay
Oblique aerial photo of March Field in May 1940, just before World War II, looking north to south
General LeMay flying a Boeing KC-135 Stratotanker during his tenure as Commander-in-Chief of the Strategic Air Command
Lockheed F-80s of the 1st Fighter Group, 1949. F-80C 49-493 undergoing maintenance, and F-80B 45-8704 behind it. 45-8704 is now on permanent display at the Aerospace Museum of California, located at the former McClellan AFB, near Sacramento.
Air Force Vice Chief of Staff General Curtis LeMay greeted by Secretary of the Air Force James H. Douglas Jr. and Chairman of The Joint Chiefs of Staff General Nathan F. Twining at Washington National Airport, upon LeMay's return from Boeing KC-135 StratoTanker non-stop flight from Buenos Aires, Argentina in November 15, 1957
A KC-135 Refueling Tanker at March
General LeMay conversed with President Kennedy at the Oval Office, White House in October 1962.
A C-17 Globemaster III stationed at March
LeMay in 1987
Northrop A-17As and Martin B-10s on the flightline
Official portrait of United States Air Force Chief of Staff General LeMay
Curtiss P-36A Hawks of the 20th Pursuit Group, 7 November 1939
Gen. Curtis E. LeMay Building, U.S. Strategic Command Headquarters

The 13th School Group and its 47th and 53rd School Squadrons provided primary and basic flying training for future Air Force leaders such as Hoyt Vandenberg, Nathan Twining, Thomas Power and Curtis LeMay.

- March Air Reserve Base

In 1989, he moved to Air Force Village West, a retirement community for former Air Force officers near March Air Force Base in Riverside.

- Curtis LeMay
An aerial view of March ARB in 2015

2 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Shield of Strategic Air Command

Strategic Air Command

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Both a United States Department of Defense (DoD) Specified Command and a United States Air Force (USAF) Major Command (MAJCOM), responsible for Cold War command and control of two of the three components of the U.S. military's strategic nuclear strike forces, the so-called "nuclear triad", with SAC having control of land-based strategic bomber aircraft and intercontinental ballistic missiles or ICBMs (the third leg of the triad being submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBM) of the U.S. Navy).

Both a United States Department of Defense (DoD) Specified Command and a United States Air Force (USAF) Major Command (MAJCOM), responsible for Cold War command and control of two of the three components of the U.S. military's strategic nuclear strike forces, the so-called "nuclear triad", with SAC having control of land-based strategic bomber aircraft and intercontinental ballistic missiles or ICBMs (the third leg of the triad being submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBM) of the U.S. Navy).

Shield of Strategic Air Command
The 1946–1951 SAC patch (above) was replaced by [[:File:SAC Shield.svg|the patch with insignia that won a SAC contest]].
Boeing B-47B Stratojet executing a rocket-assisted take off (RATO) on 15 April 1954
The RB-29 "Kee Bird" made an emergency landing in Greenland after a secret 1947 mission.
11th Bombardment Wing Convair B-36J-5-CF Peacemaker, AF Ser. No. 52-2225, circa 1955, showing "Six turnin', four burnin'".
93 BW B-52Bs at Castle AFB after the 1957 fastest round-the-world flight.
Titan II missile launching from Site 395-C, a test launch silo at Vandenberg AFB.
Strategic Air Command logo on a B-47 on display at the National Museum of the Mighty Eighth Air Force in Pooler, Georgia
Strategic Air Command Headquarters at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska.
U.S. President Jimmy Carter visiting Strategic Air Command's Headquarters.
Minuteman ICBM crew on alert in a launch complex at Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota
SAC received its first Lockheed U-2 aircraft in June 1957.
EC-135 Looking Glass aircraft
B-58A Hustler
An overhead view of two SAC
FB-111As in formation
KC-135 refueling a B-52D in 1965, the year the last KC-135 was delivered to SAC.
B-52D dropping bombs over Vietnam, circa 1970.
SAC SR-71 Blackbirds & U-2s deployed to the Vietnam War and conducted "Lucky Dragon" surveillance along North Vietnam and China borders (later named "Trojan Horse", "Olympic Torch", "Senior Book", and "Giant Dragon").
Cover of a 1975 SAC information booklet emphasizing its "Peace Is Our Profession" motto

1 May 1949: March Air Force Base, California

After a "scathing" 1948 Lindbergh review of SAC operations in the air and at six SAC bases, General Kenney was removed as Commanding General on 15 October 1948 and replaced on 19 October 1948 by 8AF's commander, Lieutenant General Curtis LeMay.

A B-52H from Barksdale AFB flying over Texas

Boeing B-52 Stratofortress

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American long-range, subsonic, jet-powered strategic bomber.

American long-range, subsonic, jet-powered strategic bomber.

A B-52H from Barksdale AFB flying over Texas
A B-52H from Barksdale AFB flying over Texas
XB-52 prototype on flight line (X-4 in foreground; B-36 behind). Note original tandem-seat "bubble" style canopy, similar to Boeing's earlier B-47 Stratojet.
Side view of YB-52 bomber, still fitted with a tandem cockpit, in common with other jet bombers in US service, such as the B-45 Tornado, B-47 Stratojet and B-57 Canberra
B-52H Stratofortress undergoing maintenance to its rudder with its fin folded
First flight of the B-52 Stratofortress on 15 April 1952.
B-52H (AF Ser. No. 61-0023), configured at the time as a testbed to investigate structural failures, still flying after its vertical stabilizer sheared off in severe turbulence on 10 January 1964. The aircraft landed safely.
A view of the lower deck of the B-52, dubbed the battle station
A B-52D with anti-flash white on the under side
USAF B-52H Stratofortress engines
Three B-52Bs of the 93rd Bomb Wing prepare to depart March AFB for Castle AFB, California, after their record-setting round-the-world flight in 1957.
Southerly route of the Operation Chrome Dome airborne nuclear alert
Soviet specialists inspect the wreckage of the B-52 Stratofortress shot down near Hanoi on 23 December 1972
B-52F dropping bombs on Vietnam
Tail armament of a B-52G at Hill Aerospace Museum; this is a post-Vietnam model with the tail-gunner in the forward crew compartment, while earlier models used the traditional tail gunner's position.
B-52H modified to carry two Lockheed D-21B drones
Retired B-52s are stored at the 309th AMARG (formerly AMARC), a desert storage facility often called the "Boneyard" at Davis-Monthan AFB near Tucson, Arizona.
A B-52H Stratofortress of the 2nd Bomb Wing takes off from Andersen Air Force Base, Guam
B-52 taking off from Tinker AFB
B-52 at the Australian airshow, 2011
NB-52A carrying an X-15
NASA's NB-52B Balls 8 (lower) and its replacement B-52H on the flight line at Edwards Air Force Base in 2004
B-52D dropping 500-lb bombs
B-52G on static display at Langley Air Force Base in Hampton, Virginia
A static B-52G that resides at Griffiss International Airport (formerly Griffiss AFB). Also pictured is an AGM-86 ALCM cruise missile.
One of the two MK 39 nuclear bombs involved in the 1961 Goldsboro crash after soft landing with parachute deployed. The weapon was recovered intact after three of the four stages of the arming sequence were completed.
The thermonuclear bomb that fell into the sea recovered off Palomares, Almería, 1966
Boeing B-52H Stratofortress 3-view drawing
B-52H profile, circa 1987
Boeing B-52H static display with weapons, Barksdale AFB 2006. A second B-52H can be seen in flight in the background

Subsequently, in November 1946, the Deputy Chief of Air Staff for Research and Development, General Curtis LeMay, expressed the desire for a cruising speed of 400 miles per hour (345 kn, 645 km/h), to which Boeing responded with a 300,000 lb (136,000 kg) aircraft.

On 19 October 1978, B-52D 56-0594 crashed on takeoff at March AFB, Riverside, California, due to loss of power on engines 1 and 2, and loss of water augmentation on the left wing. Eight of the nine crew were killed.