Cutty Sark

Cutty Sark MuseumCutty-SarkFerreiratea clipper
Cutty Sark is a British clipper ship.wikipedia
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Greenwich

Greenwich, LondonGreenwich, EnglandEast Greenwich
By 1954, she had ceased to be useful as a cadet ship and was transferred to permanent dry dock at Greenwich, London, for public display. She is located near the centre of Greenwich, in south-east London, close aboard the National Maritime Museum, the former Greenwich Hospital, and Greenwich Park.
The maritime connections of Greenwich were celebrated in the 20th century, with the siting of the Cutty Sark and Gipsy Moth IV next to the river front, and the National Maritime Museum in the former buildings of the Royal Hospital School in 1934.

Jock Willis Shipping Line

Jock WillisJock Willis & SonsJohn "Jock" "White Hat" Willis & Son
Built on the River Leven, Dumbarton, Scotland in 1869 for the Jock Willis Shipping Line, she was one of the last tea clippers to be built and one of the fastest, coming at the end of a long period of design development, which halted as sailing ships gave way to steam propulsion.
It owned a number of clippers including the historic tea clipper Cutty Sark.

Cutty Sark (whisky)

Cutty SarkCutty Sark whiskybrand of Scotch whisky
Cutty Sark whisky derives its name from the ship.
The name comes from the River Clyde–built clipper ship Cutty Sark, whose name came from the Scots language term "cutty-sark", the short shirt [skirt] prominently mentioned in the famous poem by Robert Burns, "Tam o' Shanter".

Saro Cutty Sark

Saro A.17 Cutty SarkCutty SarkSaro A17 Cutty Sark
The ship also inspired the name of the Saunders Roe Cutty Sark flying boat.
The aircraft was named after the ship Cutty Sark, rather than the garment.

Thames Nautical Training College

HMS ''WorcesterHMS WorcesterWorcester
After his death, Cutty Sark was transferred to the Thames Nautical Training College, Greenhithe in 1938 where she became an auxiliary cadet training ship alongside HMS Worcester.
In 1938, the clipper Cutty Sark was acquired by the college and berthed alongside Worcester and during the Second World War some seamanship classes were held in the ship.

Clipper

clipper shipclipper shipstea clipper
Built on the River Leven, Dumbarton, Scotland in 1869 for the Jock Willis Shipping Line, she was one of the last tea clippers to be built and one of the fastest, coming at the end of a long period of design development, which halted as sailing ships gave way to steam propulsion. Cutty Sark is a British clipper ship.
The last example of these still in reasonable condition was Cutty Sark, preserved in dry dock at Greenwich, United Kingdom.

Hercules Linton

Scott & LintonScott and Linton
Willis chose Hercules Linton to design and build the ship but Willis already possessed another ship, The Tweed, which he considered to have exceptional performance.
Hercules Linton (1 January 1837 – 15 May 1900) was a Scottish surveyor, designer, shipbuilder, antiquarian and local councillor, best known as the designer of the Cutty Sark and partner in the yard of Scott and Linton, which built her.

Ambassador (clipper)

AmbassadorAmbassador'' (clipper)
She is one of only three remaining original composite construction (wooden hull on an iron frame) clipper ships from the nineteenth century in part or whole, the others being the, which arrived in Port Adelaide, South Australia on 3 February 2014 for preservation, and the beached skeleton of Ambassador of 1869 near Punta Arenas, Chile.

Dumbarton

DunbartonDumbarton, ScotlandDumbarton District
Their shipyard was at Dumbarton on the River Leven on a site previously occupied by shipbuilders William Denny & Brothers.
A great many ships were built in the town, the most famous of which is probably the Cutty Sark which was built by Scott & Linton, she was one of the final Tea Clippers to be built, and one of the fastest.

Thermopylae (clipper)

ThermopylaeThermopylae'' (clipper)
In 1868 the brand new Aberdeen built clipper Thermopylae set a record time of 61 days port to port on her maiden voyage from London to Melbourne and it was this design that Willis set out to better.
In 1872, Thermopylae raced the clipper Cutty Sark from Shanghai back to London.

Blackadder (clipper)

BlackadderBlackadder'' (clipper)
Willis also commissioned two all-iron clippers with designs based upon The Tweed, Hallowe'en and Blackadder.
In 1869 Jock Willis, junior (son of Jock Willis, senior, founder of the company) had commissioned another clipper, Cutty Sark, which was a composite design (timber hull on iron frame).

Composite ship

compositecomposite hullcomposite hulled
She is one of only three remaining original composite construction (wooden hull on an iron frame) clipper ships from the nineteenth century in part or whole, the others being the, which arrived in Port Adelaide, South Australia on 3 February 2014 for preservation, and the beached skeleton of Ambassador of 1869 near Punta Arenas, Chile.

Cutty-sark (witch)

Cutty-sarkCutty sarkgarment
The ship was named after Cutty-sark, the nickname of the witch Nannie Dee in Robert Burns's 1791 poem Tam o' Shanter.
She was the namesake of the tea clipper Cutty Sark, which featured her figurehead at the bow.

William Denny and Brothers

William Denny & BrothersDennyWilliam Denny
Their shipyard was at Dumbarton on the River Leven on a site previously occupied by shipbuilders William Denny & Brothers.

Punjaub (ship)

PunjaubThe Tweed
Willis chose Hercules Linton to design and build the ship but Willis already possessed another ship, The Tweed, which he considered to have exceptional performance.
Although she was herself too large for the tea trade, he commissioned three clipper ships based on her hull design, Cutty Sark, Blackadder and Hallowe'en.

National Maritime Museum

Caird MedalNMMNational Maritime Museum, Greenwich
She is located near the centre of Greenwich, in south-east London, close aboard the National Maritime Museum, the former Greenwich Hospital, and Greenwich Park.
In 2012, Her Majesty the Queen formally approved Royal Museums Greenwich as the new overall title for the National Maritime Museum, Queen’s House, the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, and the Cutty Sark.

Richard Woodget

Woodget, Richard
In 1885 Richard Woodget was appointed captain on a salary of £186 per year (£23,729.80 in 2019 when adjusted for inflation) and continued to improve on the fastest trip record, achieving 77 days on his first outward trip and 73 days returning to Britain from Australia.
Richard Woodget (21 November 1845 – 5/6 March 1928) was an English sea captain, best known as the master of the famous sailing clipper Cutty Sark during her most successful period of service in the wool trade between Australia and the United Kingdom.

Muntz metal

yellow metalbrass alloycopper alloy
All the external timbers were secured by Muntz metal (brass) bolts to the internal iron frame and the hull covered by Muntz sheeting up to the 18 ft depth mark.
A notable use of Muntz Metal was in the hull of the Cutty Sark.

Greenhithe

Ingress, KentIngress
Dowman died in 1936 and the ship was given by Catharine Dowman, his widow, along with £5000 for maintenance, to the Incorporated Thames Nautical Training College, HMS Worcester at Greenhithe.
The clipper Cutty Sark was given to the College in 1938, and was used as a 'boating station' moored off the Greenhithe estate.

Sydney Cumbers

The gallery beneath the ship holds the world's largest collection of ships' figureheads, donated to the Society by Sydney Cumbers in 1953.
He was noted for his large collection of ships' figureheads that he maintained at his house in Gravesend, and which he later donated to the Cutty Sark museum.

Cutty Sark for Maritime Greenwich DLR station

Cutty SarkCutty Sark DLR stationCutty Sark station
Cutty Sark station on the Docklands Light Railway is one minute's walk away, with connections to central London and the London Underground.
Cutty Sark for Maritime Greenwich is a light metro station on the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) Bank-Lewisham Line in Greenwich, south-east London, so named for its proximity to the Cutty Sark in the Maritime Greenwich district.

London Marathon

LondonFlora London MarathonVirgin Money London Marathon
She is also a prominent landmark on the route of the London Marathon.
As the runners reach the 10 km, they pass by the Old Royal Naval College and head towards Cutty Sark drydocked in Greenwich.

Greenwich Pier

Greenwich
Greenwich Pier is next to the ship, and is served by scheduled river boats from piers in central London.
It is immediately adjacent to the Cutty Sark and is within easy walking distance of a variety of other popular attractions.

Cutty Sark (short story)

Cutty SarkCutty Sark" (short story)
"Cutty Sark" is a novella about the sailing ship Cutty Sark by the Soviet writer and paleontologist Ivan Yefremov.