Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012

Cybercrime Prevention Actcyber libelThe Cybercrime Prevention Act
The Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012, officially recorded as '''Republic Act No. 10175''', is a law in the Philippines approved on September 12, 2012.wikipedia
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Internet in the Philippines

InternetPhilippines
It aims to address legal issues concerning online interactions and the Internet in the Philippines.
The Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012, codified as ''Republic Act No.

Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas

Central Bank of the PhilippinesBSPCentral Bank
Anonymous also defaced government websites, including those of the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas, the Metropolitan Waterworks and Sewerage System and the Intellectual Property Office.
On the evening of September 26, 2012, a Wednesday, the BSP website was hacked by a group named Anonymous Philippines in a protest against the recently passed Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012.

Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom

A Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom was crowdsourced by Filipino netizens with the intent of, among other things, repealing the Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012.
The Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom was proposed as an alternative to the Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012 whose enactment was met with mixed reactions.

Revised Penal Code of the Philippines

Revised Penal CodeAct 3815Penal Code
9775 (the Anti-Child Pornography Act of 2009), and libel, an offense under Section 355 of the Revised Penal Code of the Philippines, also criminalizing them when committed using a computer system.

Stop Online Piracy Act

SOPAStop Online Piracy Act (SOPA)HR 3261
He also added that the new law is unlike the controversial Stop Online Piracy Act and PROTECT IP Act.

Philippines

FilipinoPhilippinePhilippine Islands
10175''', is a law in the Philippines approved on September 12, 2012.

Cybersquatting

cybersquattercybersquattersdomain squatting
Among the cybercrime offenses included in the bill are cybersquatting, cybersex, child pornography, identity theft, illegal access to data and libel. The Act, divided into 31 sections split across eight chapters, criminalizes several types of offense, including illegal access (hacking), data interference, device misuse, cybersquatting, computer-related offenses such as computer fraud, content-related offenses such as cybersex and spam, and other offenses.

Cybersex

cyber sexcyber-sexonline sex
Among the cybercrime offenses included in the bill are cybersquatting, cybersex, child pornography, identity theft, illegal access to data and libel. The Act, divided into 31 sections split across eight chapters, criminalizes several types of offense, including illegal access (hacking), data interference, device misuse, cybersquatting, computer-related offenses such as computer fraud, content-related offenses such as cybersex and spam, and other offenses.

Child pornography

child pornchild pornographerpornography
Among the cybercrime offenses included in the bill are cybersquatting, cybersex, child pornography, identity theft, illegal access to data and libel.

Identity theft

identity thiefidentity thievesfalse identity
Among the cybercrime offenses included in the bill are cybersquatting, cybersex, child pornography, identity theft, illegal access to data and libel.

Supreme Court of the Philippines

Supreme CourtPhilippine Supreme CourtChief Justice
On October 9, 2012, the Supreme Court of the Philippines issued a temporary restraining order, stopping implementation of the Act for 120 days, and extended it on 5 February 2013 "until further orders from the court."

Cybercrime

computer crimecyber crimeInternet crime
The Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012 is the one of the first law in the Philippines which specifically criminalizes computer crime, which prior to the passage of the law had no strong legal precedent in Philippine jurisprudence.

ILOVEYOU

I Love YouOnel de GuzmanILOVEYOU virus
8792 ) regulated certain computer-related activities, these laws did not provide a legal basis for criminalizing crimes committed on a computer in general: for example, Onel de Guzman, the computer programmer charged with purportedly writing the ILOVEYOU computer worm, was ultimately not prosecuted by Philippine authorities due to a lack of legal basis for him to be charged under existing Philippine laws at the time of his arrest.

14th Congress of the Philippines

14th Congress14thFourteenth
This was superseded by several cybercrime-related bills filed in the 14th and 15th Congress.

15th Congress of the Philippines

15th Congress15thFifteenth
This was superseded by several cybercrime-related bills filed in the 14th and 15th Congress.

Legislative districts of Tarlac

1st1st District2nd District
5808, authored by Representative Susan Yap-Sulit of the second district of Tarlac and 36 other co-authors, and Senate Bill No.

Edgardo Angara

Edgardo J. AngaraAngara Edgardo Angara
2796, proposed by Senator Edgardo Angara.

Impeachment of Renato Corona

impeachment trialImpeachment of Chief Justice Renato CoronaImpeachment
Both bills were passed by their respective chambers within one day of each other on June 5 and 4, 2012, respectively, shortly after the impeachment of Renato Corona, and the final version of the Act was signed into law by President Benigno Aquino III on September 12.

Benigno Aquino III

Benigno S. Aquino IIINoynoy AquinoBenigno Aquino
Both bills were passed by their respective chambers within one day of each other on June 5 and 4, 2012, respectively, shortly after the impeachment of Renato Corona, and the final version of the Act was signed into law by President Benigno Aquino III on September 12.

Security hacker

hackerhackinghackers
The Act, divided into 31 sections split across eight chapters, criminalizes several types of offense, including illegal access (hacking), data interference, device misuse, cybersquatting, computer-related offenses such as computer fraud, content-related offenses such as cybersex and spam, and other offenses.

Data erasure

Data destructiondisk wipingerase
The Act, divided into 31 sections split across eight chapters, criminalizes several types of offense, including illegal access (hacking), data interference, device misuse, cybersquatting, computer-related offenses such as computer fraud, content-related offenses such as cybersex and spam, and other offenses.

Computer fraud

computerComputer Fraud and Abuse Act of AmericaComputer fraud case studies
The Act, divided into 31 sections split across eight chapters, criminalizes several types of offense, including illegal access (hacking), data interference, device misuse, cybersquatting, computer-related offenses such as computer fraud, content-related offenses such as cybersex and spam, and other offenses.

Spamming

spamspammersspammer
The Act, divided into 31 sections split across eight chapters, criminalizes several types of offense, including illegal access (hacking), data interference, device misuse, cybersquatting, computer-related offenses such as computer fraud, content-related offenses such as cybersex and spam, and other offenses.

Universal jurisdiction

principle of universal justiceuniversal justiceuniversal
The Act has universal jurisdiction: its provisions apply to all Filipino nationals regardless of the place of commission.