Fortifications of the Jasna Góra Monastery
Wawel Castle in Kraków
The Black Madonna of Częstochowa
Old Town in Lublin
Kazimierz Pulaski and the Bar Confederation 1772 defence of Częstochowa. Painting by Chełmoński.
Mannerist architecture in Tarnów
Interior of basilica, Jasna Góra Monastery
The Lesser Poland Province of the Polish Crown in the widest sense – with Red Ruthenia, Podlachia, Podolia and Kiev
Polish insurgents in Częstochowa during the January Uprising
Palm Sunday in Lipnica Murowana.
Częstochowa in the early 20th century
The 1507 Lesser Poland and Red Ruthenia Map (Polonia Minor, Russia) by Martin Waldseemüller
Match factory modernized in the 1920s, now a museum
Kazimierz Dolny on the right bank of the Vistula river.
German troops in Częstochowa during the invasion of Poland
Niepołomice
Monument dedicated to the fallen defenders of Poland in the Polish–Soviet War and World War II
Pieniny National Park
Celebration of the 1000th anniversary of the baptism of Poland with the participation of Primate of Poland Stefan Wyszyński in 1966
Będzin Castle, which guarded the western border of Lesser Poland
Huta Częstochowa steelworks
Kozłówka Palace
Cathedral Basilica of the Holy Family
Palatial residence in Kurozwęki
Franke's House
Pieskowa Skała
Zapałkiewicz House
Members of the regional Folk Group of Wilamowice "Cepelia Fil Wilamowice"
Polish Bank's Townhouse
Lachy Sądeckie are a group of ethnic Poles who live in southern Lesser Poland
Old houses at Ulica 7 Kamienic
Broad Gauge Metallurgy Line
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Czarny Staw (Black Pond) in the High Tatras
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Nowy Wiśnicz
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Baranów Sandomierski
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Vistula in Sandomierz
Philharmonic of Częstochowa
"Peasant war" by Jan Lewicki (1795–1871)
Adam Mickiewicz Theatre
Galizien
Jan Długosz University
In the 19th century, Kraków's Jagiellonian University was a major center of Polish science and culture
CKM Włókniarz Częstochowa stadium
Gorals from Beskidy
Sports Hall Częstochowa
Castle of Bobolice
Miejski Stadion Piłkarski "Raków", home venue of Raków Częstochowa
Wieliczka Salt Mine, a UNESCO World Heritage Site
Municipal office
Pope John Paul II was born in Wadowice, Lesser Poland, in 1920
Map of Częstochowa's neighborhoods
Soldiers of Holy Cross Mountains Brigade in parade 1945
Jakub Błaszczykowski
A fire engine made by FSC Star in Lesser Poland's Starachowice
Jerzy Kulej
Boundary between Lesser Poland and Upper Silesia (red line) on the territory of current Silesian Voivodeship
Maryi Panny Avenue
Kraków is the capital of Lesser Poland
View on the Avenues
Lublin, the second-largest city of Lesser Poland
3rd Avenue during the night
Częstochowa, the third-largest city of Lesser Poland
Staszic Park
Radom, the fourth-largest city of Lesser Poland
Sienkiewicz Avenue
Sosnowiec, the fifth-largest city of Lesser Poland
National Road {{Jct|country=POL|DK|1}} in Częstochowa
Folklore group in Podhale costume, Bukowina Tatrzańska, Lesser Poland, 2016
Częstochowa, Częstochowa Osobowa (Główna) Railway S tation
Polish flat soda bread (known as Proziaki in podkarpacie)
Twist tram in Częstochowa
KS Cracovia on Independence Day 2019
Konstal 105Na trams on Niepodległości (Independence) Avenue
A map of Polish dialects. The area where Lesser Poland's dialect is spoken is marked in orange.
Town Hall and Częstochowa Regional Museum
Halina Poświatowska Museum
Archaeological Reserve in Częstochowa
Iron Ore Mining Museum
Museum of Match Production
Regional Specialist Hospital - Parkitka, Nowobialska Street
City Polyclinical Hospital - Mirowska Street
Regional Specialist Hospital - PCK Street
City Polyclinical Hospital - Mickiewicz Street
St Barbara and St Andrew Church
St Sigismund Church
St Roch and Sebastian Church
St Jacob's Church
Katedra Polskokatolicka
Cerkiew Ikony

However, Częstochowa is historically part of the Lesser Poland region, not of Silesia, and before 1795, it belonged to the Kraków Voivodeship.

- Częstochowa

As a result of this long-lasting division, many inhabitants of the northern part of Lesser Poland (including those in such cities as Lublin, Radom, Kielce and Częstochowa) do not recognize their Lesser Polish identity.

- Lesser Poland

13 related topics

Alpha

Second Polish Republic

Country in Central and Eastern Europe that existed between 1918 and 1939.

Country in Central and Eastern Europe that existed between 1918 and 1939.

The Second Polish Republic in 1930
Coat of arms of Poland, 1919-1927
The Second Polish Republic in 1930
Polish defences at Miłosna, during the decisive Battle of Warsaw, August 1920
Marshal Józef Piłsudski, Chief of State (Naczelnik Państwa) between November 1918 and December 1922
The May Coup d'État (1926)
Ignacy Mościcki, President of Poland (left), Warsaw, 10 November 1936, awarding the Marshal's buława to Edward Rydz-Śmigły
The PZL.37 Łoś was a Polish twin-engine medium bomber.
Polish pavilion at Expo 1937 in Paris
Polish pavilion at the 1939 World's Fair in New York City
Poland's MS Batory, and MS Piłsudski, at the sea port of Gdynia, 18 December 1937
The Eastern Trade Fair in Lwów, 1936
Gdynia, a modern Polish seaport established in 1926
Industry and communications in Poland before the start of the Second World War
The CWS T-1 Torpedo was the first serially-built car manufactured in Poland.
Ciągówka Ursus was the first Polish farm tractor, produced from 1922 to 1927 in the Ursus Factory.
Prime Minister Kazimierz Bartel, also a scholar and mathematician
The National Museum in Warsaw (Polish: Muzeum Narodowe w Warszawie), popularly known as the MNW, opened in 1938.
Marian Rejewski, Jerzy Różycki and Henryk Zygalski, Polish mathematicians and cryptologists who worked at breaking the German Enigma ciphers before and during the Second World War
Poland's population density in 1930
Contemporary map showing language frequency in 1931 across Poland; red: more than 50% native Polish speakers; green: more than 50% native language other than Polish, including Yiddish, Hebrew, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Russian and less frequent others
Officers from the Second Mountain Brigade of the Polish Legions in the First World War establishing the Polish-Czechoslovak border; they are pictured near the summit of Popadia in Gorgany during the formation of the Second Republic, 1915.
Physical map of the Second Polish Republic
Polish infantry marching, 1939
Polish soldiers with anti-aircraft artillery near Warsaw Central Station during the first days of September, 1939
Polish 7TP light tanks
ORP Orzeł was the lead ship of her class of submarines serving in the Polish Navy during the Second World War.

Polish industry was concentrated in the west, mostly in Polish Upper Silesia, and the adjacent Lesser Poland's province of Zagłębie Dąbrowskie, where the bulk of coal mines and steel plants was located.

Furthermore, heavy industry plants were located in Częstochowa (Huta Częstochowa, founded in 1896), Ostrowiec Świętokrzyski (Huta Ostrowiec, founded in 1837–1839), Stalowa Wola (brand new industrial city, which was built from scratch in 1937 – 1938), Chrzanów (Fablok, founded in 1919), Jaworzno, Trzebinia (oil refinery, opened in 1895), Łódź (the seat of Polish textile industry), Poznań (H. Cegielski – Poznań), Kraków and Warsaw (Ursus Factory).

Kraków

Second-largest and one of the oldest cities in Poland.

Second-largest and one of the oldest cities in Poland.

Tomb of Casimir III the Great at Wawel Cathedral. Kraków was the capital of Poland from 1038 to 1596.
The Church of St. Adalbert is one of the oldest churches in the city, dating from the 11th century.
Woodcut of Kraków from the Nuremberg Chronicle, 1493
View of Kraków (Cracovia) near the end of the 16th-century
Tadeusz Kościuszko takes the oath of loyalty to the Polish nation in Kraków's market square (Rynek), 1794
Act of granting the constitution to the Free City of Krakow. After the Partitions of Poland, Kraków was independent city republic and the only piece of sovereign Polish territory between 1815 and 1846.
Flower vendors in Rynek. First autochrome in Poland, dated 1912
Kraków Ghetto, 1942—a German checkpoint during operation Aktion Krakau
Kraków's territorial growth from the late 18th to the 20th century
Camaldolese Hermit Monastery in Bielany
Convent of Norbertine Sisters in Kraków-Zwierzyniec and the Vistula River during the summer season
The Renaissance Cloth Hall (Sukiennice) in Main Market Square
The Kraków Barbican dating from around 1498 was once a fortified outpost of the inner medieval city.
Kanonicza Street, at the foot of the Wawel Castle
View of Kraków from St. Mary's Basilica in the Market Square
Palace of Art at Szczepański Square is an example of Art Nouveau architecture in central Kraków.
Basztowa Street, filled with some of the most unique historical buildings in all architectural styles; part of the Royal Route of Kraków
Pawilon Wyspiański 2000 is a rare example of Postmodern architecture present in Kraków's Old Town.
Planty Park, which surrounds Kraków's Old Town
A pavilion within the Planty Park during winter
The New Town Hall of Podgórze, which used to be a self-governing independent town until its incorporation into Kraków in 1915
Entrance to the Wielopolski Palace from 1560, the seat of Kraków's mayor, administration and city council
Matejko Square, featuring the Grunwald Monument at Kleparz, is one of the city's most important public spaces.
Socialist-realist district of Nowa Huta
The Center for Business Innovation office complex in Kraków
Unity Tower, one of the tallest buildings in the city
Bombardier city tram on Piłsudski Bridge
PKP Intercity train at the Main Railway Station
Wawel Cathedral, home to royal coronations and resting place of many national heroes; considered to be Poland's national sanctuary
Saint Anne's Church is the leading example of Baroque architecture in Poland.
Kraków University of Economics
Collegium Maius, Jagiellonian University's oldest building
Leonardo da Vinci's Lady with an Ermine, at the Czartoryski Museum
The National Museum in Kraków is one of Poland's finest galleries of art.
Kraków Congress Centre – the business and cultural flagship of the city
Kraków's renowned Juliusz Słowacki Theatre
Concert hall of the Kraków Philharmonic
Wisła Kraków Stadium
Tauron Arena Kraków
Cracovia Stadium
Wawel Castle
German concentration camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau
Wieliczka Salt Mine
Pieskowa Skała castle
Benedictine Tyniec Abbey

Kraków is one of Poland's most important economic centres and the economic hub of the Lesser Poland (Małopolska) region.

Railway connections are available to most Polish cities, e.g. Katowice, Częstochowa, Szczecin, Gdynia and Warsaw.

Upper Silesia

Southeastern part of the historical and geographical region of Silesia, located today mostly in Poland, with small parts in the Czech Republic.

Southeastern part of the historical and geographical region of Silesia, located today mostly in Poland, with small parts in the Czech Republic.

Moravian-Silesian Beskids
Silesian flag used by Silesians
Coat of arms of Upper Silesia as drawn by Hugo Gerard Ströhl (1851–1919)
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1746 map of Upper Silesia, Homann heirs, Nuremberg
Silesian Parliament in Katowice
Katowice
Ostrava
Gliwice
Opole
Silesian dumplings
Silesian gorals

Within the adjacent Silesian Beskids to the east, the Vistula River rises and turns eastwards, the Biała and Przemsza tributaries mark the eastern border with Lesser Poland.

The Polish Upper Silesian territory covers most of the Opole Voivodeship, except for the Lower Silesian counties of Brzeg and Namysłów, and the western half of the Silesian Voivodeship (except for the Lesser Polish counties of Będzin, Bielsko-Biała, Częstochowa with the city of Częstochowa, Kłobuck, Myszków, Zawiercie and Żywiec, as well as the cities of Dąbrowa Górnicza, Jaworzno and Sosnowiec).

Silesian Voivodeship

Voivodeship, or province, in southern Poland, centered on the historic region known as Upper Silesia (Górny Śląsk), with Katowice serving as its capital.

Voivodeship, or province, in southern Poland, centered on the historic region known as Upper Silesia (Górny Śląsk), with Katowice serving as its capital.

Pless Castle in Pszczyna
Katowice is the capital of the Silesian Voivodeship
Jasna Góra in Częstochowa is the holiest Roman Catholic shrine in Poland
Gliwice, one of the oldest cities in Silesia
Bielsko-Biała is a major industrial, transport and touristic hub
Terminal A at Katowice International Airport
Silesian Regional Assembly
Little Beskids Landscape Park

The eastern half of Silesian Voivodeship (and, notably, Częstochowa in the north) was historically part of Lesser Poland.

Allegory of the first partition of Poland, showing Catherine the Great of Russia (left), Joseph II of Austria and Frederick the Great of Prussia (right) quarrelling over their territorial seizures

Partitions of Poland

The Partitions of Poland were three partitions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth that took place toward the end of the 18th century and ended the existence of the state, resulting in the elimination of sovereign Poland and Lithuania for 123 years.

The Partitions of Poland were three partitions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth that took place toward the end of the 18th century and ended the existence of the state, resulting in the elimination of sovereign Poland and Lithuania for 123 years.

Allegory of the first partition of Poland, showing Catherine the Great of Russia (left), Joseph II of Austria and Frederick the Great of Prussia (right) quarrelling over their territorial seizures
Włodzimierz Tetmajer, Allegory of Dead Poland, St. Nicholas Cathedral, Kalisz
The Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth after the First Partition, as a protectorate of the Russian Empire (1773–89)
Rejtan at Sejm 1773, oil on canvas by Jan Matejko, 1866, 282 x, Royal Castle in Warsaw
The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth after the Second Partition (1793)
1793 Russian campaign medal
"A map of the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania including Samogitia and Curland divided according to their dismemberments with the Kingdom of Prussia" from 1799
The partition of Poland according to the German–Soviet Pact; division of Polish territories in the years 1939–1941

Nevertheless, several battles and sieges took place, as Bar confederation troops and French volunteers refused to lay down their arms (most notably, in Tyniec, Częstochowa and Kraków).

To Austria fell Zator and Auschwitz (Oświęcim), part of Lesser Poland embracing parts of the counties of Kraków and Sandomir and the whole of Galicia, less the city of Kraków.

General Pulaski, by Polish artist Jan Styka POL_COA_Ślepowron.svg Coat of arms: Ślepowron

Casimir Pulaski

Polish nobleman, soldier, and military commander who has been called, together with his counterpart Michael Kovats de Fabriczy, "the father of the American cavalry."

Polish nobleman, soldier, and military commander who has been called, together with his counterpart Michael Kovats de Fabriczy, "the father of the American cavalry."

General Pulaski, by Polish artist Jan Styka POL_COA_Ślepowron.svg Coat of arms: Ślepowron
Pulaski at Częstochowa, an 1875 painting by Józef Chełmoński
Casimir Pulaski gathering supporters for the Confederation at Bar. Painting by Korneli Szlegel
Map of the Bar Confederation conflict in Poland between 1768 and 1772, with white areas being controlled by the Confederates
Pulaski at the walls of Jasna Góra Monastery in 1770, by artist Juliusz Kossak
Pulaski on horseback, painting by Juliusz Kossak, 1883
Pulaski mortally wounded by grapeshot while leading cavalry charge
United States postage stamp featuring General Casimir Pulaski. Issue of 1931, 2 cents
Statue of Pulaski at the Kazimierz Pułaski Museum in Warka, Poland.
Monument in Baltimore, Maryland
Fort Pulaski in Georgia, U.S.

Based in Izby, he subsequently operated in southern Lesser Poland and on May 13 his force was defeated at the Battle of Dęborzyn.

He then departed for Częstochowa.

The Bar Confederates pray before the Battle of Lanckorona. Painting by Artur Grottger.

Bar Confederation

Association of Polish nobles (szlachta) formed at the fortress of Bar in Podolia (now part of Ukraine) in 1768 to defend the internal and external independence of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth against Russian influence and against King Stanislaus II Augustus with Polish reformers, who were attempting to limit the power of the Commonwealth's wealthy magnates.

Association of Polish nobles (szlachta) formed at the fortress of Bar in Podolia (now part of Ukraine) in 1768 to defend the internal and external independence of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth against Russian influence and against King Stanislaus II Augustus with Polish reformers, who were attempting to limit the power of the Commonwealth's wealthy magnates.

The Bar Confederates pray before the Battle of Lanckorona. Painting by Artur Grottger.
Casimir Pulaski at Częstochowa. Painting by Józef Chełmoński, 1875. Oil on canvas.  National Museum, Warsaw, Poland.
Karol Stanisław Radziwiłł
Marshal of the Bar Confederation Michał Krasiński receives an Ottoman dignitary.
The standard of the Bar confederates
Bar Confederation 1768-72

There was also a pro-Confederation force in Lesser Poland, that operated from June till August, that ended with the royal forces securing Kraków on 22 August, followed by a period of conflict in Belarus (August–October), that ended with the surrender of Nesvizh on 26 October.

Many fortresses in their command held out as long as possible; Wawel Castle in Kraków fell only on 28 April; Tyniec fortress held until 13 July 1772; Częstochowa, commanded by Casimir Pulaski, held until 18 August.

Lelów

Village in Częstochowa County, Silesian Voivodeship, in southern Poland.

Village in Częstochowa County, Silesian Voivodeship, in southern Poland.

Hasidic Jews praying in the synagogue
Market Square

It lies on the Białka river, approximately 39 km east of Częstochowa and 66 km north-east of the regional capital Katowice.

In the Kingdom of Poland, Lelów was an important urban center of Lesser Poland, as a capital of a county which belonged to Kraków Voivodeship.

Kraków Voivodeship in
the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1635.

Kraków Voivodeship (14th century – 1795)

Kraków Voivodeship 1300–1795 (Palatinatus Cracoviensis, Województwo Krakowskie) – a unit of administrative division and local government in the Kingdom of Poland from the 14th century to the partitions of Poland in 1772–1795 (see History of Poland during the Piast dynasty, Kingdom of Poland (1385–1569), and Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth).

Kraków Voivodeship 1300–1795 (Palatinatus Cracoviensis, Województwo Krakowskie) – a unit of administrative division and local government in the Kingdom of Poland from the 14th century to the partitions of Poland in 1772–1795 (see History of Poland during the Piast dynasty, Kingdom of Poland (1385–1569), and Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth).

Kraków Voivodeship in
the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1635.
Kraków Voivodeship in
the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1635.
Administrative division at the end of the 16th century

Located in the southwestern corner of the country, it was part of the Little Poland province (together with two other ancient voivodeships of Poland – Sandomierz Voivodeship, and Lublin Voivodeship).

Among cities and towns of contemporary Poland, which were part of Kraków Voivodeship, are Będzin, Biała, Bochnia, Brzesko, Częstochowa, Dąbrowa Górnicza, Jasło, Jaworzno, Jędrzejów, Krzepice, Kłobuck, Miechów, Nowy Sącz, Nowy Targ, Oświęcim, Sosnowiec, Szczekociny, Zakopane, Zator, Zawiercie, and Żywiec.

Kielce

City in southern Poland with 193,415 inhabitants.

City in southern Poland with 193,415 inhabitants.

A typical Polish manor house called dworek, dating back to the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth. The pictured house is one of the city's most precious buildings
Camp of the Russian Imperial Army near Kielce during the January Uprising, 1863
Józef Piłsudski with the Polish Legions in Kielce, in front of the Governor's Palace, 1914
Kielce Synagogue, built 1903-1909
Building of the Kielce Jewish Committee and refugee centre on Planty Street
Sienkiewicza Street, summer 2011
Palace of the Kraków Bishops in Kielce
Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce
Map of the centre of Kielce
Stefan Żeromski Theatre
Kielce History Museum
Sports hall in Kielce
Football stadium in Kielce
Kielce Business Center - the headquarters of Exbud-Skanska, a symbol of modern Kielce
Stanisław Staszic monument
St. Adalbert Church dating back to 10th century
Exaltation of the Holy Cross church
Sienkiewicza Street (Old Market)
alt=Hotel in Kielce, Sienkiewicza Street|Versal Hotel in Kielce, Sienkiewicza Street
Market Square at night
Square of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Kielce Fair
The Monument of The Legion Four
City Park
Holy Trinity Church, built 1640–1644
Karczówka Monastery, built 1624–1631
Garrison Church, built 1902–1904
Statue of Miles Davis in Kielce

The city is in the middle of the Świętokrzyskie Mountains (Holy Cross Mountains), on the banks of the Silnica River, in the northern part of the historical Polish province of Lesser Poland.

Kielce – Ruda Strawczyńska – Łopuszno – Włoszczowa – Koniecpol – Święta Anna – Częstochowa