Czech Silesia

SilesiaSilesianAustrian SilesiaMoravian-SilesianČeské SlezskoAustrian or Czech SilesiaAustrian-SilesiaCzech partCzechoslovak SilesiaMoravian Silesia
Czech Silesia (České Slezsko, Tschechisch-Schlesien, Śląsk Czeski; sometimes Moravian Silesia, Moravské Slezsko,, Mährisch-Schlesien, Śląsk Morawski) is the name given to the part of the historical region of Silesia presently located in the Czech Republic.wikipedia
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Bohemia

BohemianCzechČechy
While not today an administrative entity in itself, Czech Silesia is, together with Bohemia and Moravia, one of the three historical Czech lands. Czech Silesia borders Moravia in the south, Poland (Polish Silesia) in the north (in the northwest the County of Kladsko, until 1742/48 an integral part of Bohemia) and Slovakia in the southeast.
In a broader meaning, Bohemia sometimes refers to the entire Czech territory, including Moravia and Czech Silesia, especially in a historical context, such as the Lands of the Bohemian Crown ruled by Bohemian kings.

Moravia

MoravaMoravianMähren
While not today an administrative entity in itself, Czech Silesia is, together with Bohemia and Moravia, one of the three historical Czech lands. Czech Silesia borders Moravia in the south, Poland (Polish Silesia) in the north (in the northwest the County of Kladsko, until 1742/48 an integral part of Bohemia) and Slovakia in the southeast.
Moravia (Morava; ; Morawy; Moravia) is a historical country in the Czech Republic (forming its eastern part) and one of the historical Czech lands, together with Bohemia and Czech Silesia.

Czech lands

Czechhistorical landRegion
While not today an administrative entity in itself, Czech Silesia is, together with Bohemia and Moravia, one of the three historical Czech lands.
The Czech lands or the Bohemian lands (České země) are the three historical regions of Bohemia, Moravia, and Czech Silesia.

Moravian-Silesian Region

Moravian-SilesianMoravia-SilesiaMoravian-Silesia
It lies in the north-east of the Czech Republic, predominantly in the Moravian-Silesian Region, with a section in the northern Olomouc Region. With the city of Ostrava roughly in its geographic center, the area comprises much of the modern region of Moravian-Silesia (save for its southern edges) and, in its far west, a small part of the Olomouc Region around the city of Jeseník.
The region is located in the north-eastern part of its historical region of Moravia and in most of the Czech part of the historical region of Silesia.

Olomouc Region

OlomoucOlomoucký Region, Czech RepublicPublic Health Authority of Olomouc Region
It lies in the north-east of the Czech Republic, predominantly in the Moravian-Silesian Region, with a section in the northern Olomouc Region. With the city of Ostrava roughly in its geographic center, the area comprises much of the modern region of Moravian-Silesia (save for its southern edges) and, in its far west, a small part of the Olomouc Region around the city of Jeseník.
Olomouc Region (Olomoucký kraj, Kraj ołomuniecki) is an administrative unit (kraj) of the Czech Republic, located in the north-western and central part of its historical region of Moravia (Morava) and in a small part of the historical region of Czech Silesia (České Slezsko). It is named for its capital Olomouc.

Sudetenland

SudetenSudeten crisisSudeten Germans
It is almost identical in extent with the Duchy of Upper and Lower Silesia, also known as Austrian Silesia before 1918; between 1938 and 1945, part of the area was also alluded to as Sudeten Silesia (Sudetenschlesien, Sudetské Slezsko, Śląsk Sudecki): a reference to the Sudetenland. Following the Munich Agreement of 1938, most of Czech Silesia became part of the Reichsgau Sudetenland and Poland occupied the Zaolzie area on the west bank of the Olza (the Polish gains being lost when Germany occupied Poland the following year).
These German speakers had predominated in the border districts of Bohemia, Moravia, and Czech Silesia from the time of the Austrian Empire.

Austrian Silesia

SilesiaUpper and Lower SilesiaDuchy of Upper and Lower Silesia
It is almost identical in extent with the Duchy of Upper and Lower Silesia, also known as Austrian Silesia before 1918; between 1938 and 1945, part of the area was also alluded to as Sudeten Silesia (Sudetenschlesien, Sudetské Slezsko, Śląsk Sudecki): a reference to the Sudetenland.
It is largely coterminous with the present-day region of Czech Silesia and was, historically, part of the larger Silesia region.

Ostrava

Moravská OstravaOstrauMährisch-Ostrau
With the city of Ostrava roughly in its geographic center, the area comprises much of the modern region of Moravian-Silesia (save for its southern edges) and, in its far west, a small part of the Olomouc Region around the city of Jeseník.
In terms of both population and area Ostrava is the third largest city in the Czech Republic, the second largest city in Moravia, and the largest city in Czech Silesia.

Jeseník

Freiwaldau
With the city of Ostrava roughly in its geographic center, the area comprises much of the modern region of Moravian-Silesia (save for its southern edges) and, in its far west, a small part of the Olomouc Region around the city of Jeseník.
The town is located in the historic Czech Silesia region on the Bělá River, a tributary of the Nysa Kłodzka.

Sudetes

SudetenSudeten MountainsSudetes Mountains
Situated in the Sudetes, it is cornered by the Carpathians in the east.
The Sudeten Germans (the German-speaking inhabitants of Czechoslovakia) as well as the Sudetenland (the border regions of Bohemia, Moravia, and Czech Silesia they inhabited) are named after the Sudetes.

Slovakia

🇸🇰SlovakSVK
Czech Silesia borders Moravia in the south, Poland (Polish Silesia) in the north (in the northwest the County of Kladsko, until 1742/48 an integral part of Bohemia) and Slovakia in the southeast.
In 1918, Slovakia and the regions of Bohemia, Moravia, Czech Silesia and Carpathian Ruthenia formed a common state, Czechoslovakia, with the borders confirmed by the Treaty of Saint Germain and Treaty of Trianon.

Hlučín Region

Hultschin areaHlučínskoCzech Republic
Hlučín Region (Hlučínsko, Hultschiner Ländchen), formerly part of Prussian Silesia, also became part of Czechoslovakia under the Treaty of Versailles in 1920.
Hlučín Region (Hlučínsko (familiarly Prajzsko), Hultschiner Ländchen, Kraik hulczyński) is a historically significant part of Czech Silesia, today a part of the Moravian-Silesian Region in the Czech Republic, named after its largest town Hlučín.

Silesia

ŚląskSilesianSchlesien
Czech Silesia (České Slezsko, Tschechisch-Schlesien, Śląsk Czeski; sometimes Moravian Silesia, Moravské Slezsko,, Mährisch-Schlesien, Śląsk Morawski) is the name given to the part of the historical region of Silesia presently located in the Czech Republic.
Czech Silesia

Cieszyn Silesia

Těšín SilesiaTeschenCieszyn/Těšín Silesia
In 1918, the former Duchy formed part of the newly created state of Czechoslovakia, except the Cieszyn Silesia, which was split between Czechoslovakia and Poland in 1920, Czechoslovakia gaining its western portion.
The area was important for the Czechs, as the crucial railway line connecting Czech Silesia with Slovakia crossed the area (the Košice-Bohumín Railway, which was one of only two railroads that linked the Czech provinces to Slovakia at that time).

Lands of the Bohemian Crown

Bohemian CrownBohemiaCrown of Bohemia
Modern-day Czech Silesia derives primarily from a small part of Silesia that remained within the Bohemian Crown and the Habsburg Monarchy at the end of the First Silesian War in 1742, when the rest of Silesia was ceded to Prussia.
Austrian Silesia with the Hlučín Region is today known as Czech Silesia, with the exception of eastern Cieszyn Silesia which passed to the Second Polish Republic in 1920.

Polish minority in the Czech Republic

PolishPolesPolish minority
In Cieszyn Silesia a unique dialect is also spoken, mostly by members of the Polish minority there.
For these people, the most important factor was material well-being; they cared little about the homeland from which they had fled, more readily assimilating into the Czech population which was demographically dominant in the Ostrava region in the heart of Czech Silesia.

Martin of Opava

Martin of Opava (Martinus Polonus) (†1278), chronicler, chaplain of several popes
Known in Latin as Frater Martinus Ordinis Praedicatorum (Brother Martin of the Order of Preachers), he is believed to have been born, at an unknown date, in the Silesian town of Opava (German: Troppau), at that time part of the Margraviate of Moravia.

Opava (river)

OpavaOpava River
Its major rivers are the Oder (Polish, Odra), Opava and Olše (Olza) (which forms part of the natural border with Poland).
After World War I the demarcation was confirmed by the 1919 Treaty of Saint-Germain-en-Laye as the border between Czechoslovakia (Czech Silesia) and the Second Polish Republic.

Zaolzie

a part of CzechoslovakiaAnnexation of Zaolzieannexed by Poland
Following the Munich Agreement of 1938, most of Czech Silesia became part of the Reichsgau Sudetenland and Poland occupied the Zaolzie area on the west bank of the Olza (the Polish gains being lost when Germany occupied Poland the following year).
The area was important for the Czechs as the crucial railway line connecting Czech Silesia with Slovakia crossed the area (the Košice-Bohumín Railway, which was one of only two railroads that linked the Czech provinces to Slovakia at that time).

Gregor Mendel

MendelMendelianGregor Johann Mendel
Gregor Mendel (1822–1884), biologist, founder of genetics (inheritance laws)
Mendel was born into a German-speaking family in Hynčice (Heinzendorf bei Odrau in German), at the Moravian-Silesian border, Austrian Empire (now a part of the Czech Republic).

Iva Bittová

Iva BittovaIva Bittovà
Iva Bittová (1958–), avant-garde violinist, singer, and composer
Iva Bittová was born on 22 July 1958 in the town of Bruntál, Czech Silesia, in what was then the Republic of Czechoslovakia.

Munich Agreement

Munich CrisisMunichMunich Conference
Following the Munich Agreement of 1938, most of Czech Silesia became part of the Reichsgau Sudetenland and Poland occupied the Zaolzie area on the west bank of the Olza (the Polish gains being lost when Germany occupied Poland the following year).
As a result, Bohemia, Moravia and Silesia lost about 38% of their combined area to Germany, with some 2.8 million German and 513,000-750,000 Czech inhabitants.

Moravian enclaves in Silesia

Moravian enclaveMoravian enclave in Silesia
Moravian enclaves in Silesia were parts of Moravia, but from 1783 until 1928 they were governed by Silesian authorities according to Moravian legislation.

Czech Republic

🇨🇿CzechCZE
Czech Silesia (České Slezsko, Tschechisch-Schlesien, Śląsk Czeski; sometimes Moravian Silesia, Moravské Slezsko,, Mährisch-Schlesien, Śląsk Morawski) is the name given to the part of the historical region of Silesia presently located in the Czech Republic.
The Czech Republic includes the historical territories of Bohemia, Moravia, and Czech Silesia.

Lach dialects

LachianLachLach-speaking
Some of the native Slavic population speak Lach, which is classed by Ethnologue as a dialect of Czech, although it also shows some similarities to Polish.
They are spoken in parts of Czech Silesia, the Hlučín Region, and northeastern Moravia, as well as in some adjacent villages in Poland.