Czech and Slovak Federative Republic

CzechoslovakiaCSFRCzechoslovak Federative RepublicČSFRFifth Czechoslovak Republiccommon federal stateCzechCzech and Slovak Federative Republic (President)Czech RepublicCzechoslovak
After the fall of communism in 1989, Czechoslovakia adopted the official name Czech and Slovak Federative Republic (, Česká a Slovenská Federatívna Republika; ČSFR) during the period from 23 April 1990 until 31 December 1992, when the country was dissolved into the Czech Republic and Slovakia.wikipedia
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Czechoslovakia

CzechoslovakCzechTCH
After the fall of communism in 1989, Czechoslovakia adopted the official name Czech and Slovak Federative Republic (, Česká a Slovenská Federatívna Republika; ČSFR) during the period from 23 April 1990 until 31 December 1992, when the country was dissolved into the Czech Republic and Slovakia.
1990–1992: Following the Velvet Revolution, the state was renamed the Czech and Slovak Federal Republic, consisting of the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic, and reverted to a democratic republic.

Czechoslovak Socialist Republic

CzechoslovakiaČSSRcommunist Czechoslovakia
Since 1960, Czechoslovakia's official name had been the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic (Československá socialistická republika, ČSSR).
Following the 1989 Velvet Revolution, the CSSR was renamed to the Czech and Slovak Federative Republic.

Václav Havel

Vaclav HavelHavelPresident Havel
In the aftermath of the Velvet Revolution, newly elected President Václav Havel announced that "Socialist" would be dropped from the country's official name.
Despite increasing political tensions between the Czechs and the Slovaks in 1992, Havel supported the retention of the Czech and Slovak Federative Republic prior to the dissolution of the country.

Hyphen War

controversy
This was met with general disapproval and another round of haggling, dubbed "the hyphen war" (pomlčková válka/vojna) after Slovaks' wish to insert a hyphen into the name (Česko-Slovensko).
This solution was found to be unsatisfactory, and less than a month later, on 20 April 1990, the parliament changed the name again, to the "Czech and Slovak Federative Republic" (Česká a Slovenská Federativní Republika, Česká a Slovenská Federatívna Republika, or ČSFR).

List of Presidents of Czechoslovakia

PresidentPresident of CzechoslovakiaPresidents
In the aftermath of the Velvet Revolution, newly elected President Václav Havel announced that "Socialist" would be dropped from the country's official name.
The President of Czechoslovakia was the head of state of Czechoslovakia, from the creation of the First Czechoslovak Republic in 1918 until the dissolution of the Czech and Slovak Federative Republic in 1992.

List of Prime Ministers of Czechoslovakia

Prime MinisterPrime Minister of Czechoslovakiacomplete list
The Prime Minister of Czechoslovakia was the head of government of Czechoslovakia, from the creation of the First Czechoslovak Republic in 1918 until the dissolution of the Czech and Slovak Federative Republic in 1992.

Revolutions of 1989

fall of communismthe fall of the Iron Curtaincollapse of communism
Czechoslovakia – 8 June 1990

Federal republic

federalconstitutional republicconstitutional republicanism

Velvet Revolution

fall of communismfall of the communist regime1989
After the fall of communism in 1989, Czechoslovakia adopted the official name Czech and Slovak Federative Republic (, Česká a Slovenská Federatívna Republika; ČSFR) during the period from 23 April 1990 until 31 December 1992, when the country was dissolved into the Czech Republic and Slovakia. In the aftermath of the Velvet Revolution, newly elected President Václav Havel announced that "Socialist" would be dropped from the country's official name.

Dissolution of Czechoslovakia

dissolutionVelvet Divorcebreakup
After the fall of communism in 1989, Czechoslovakia adopted the official name Czech and Slovak Federative Republic (, Česká a Slovenská Federatívna Republika; ČSFR) during the period from 23 April 1990 until 31 December 1992, when the country was dissolved into the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

Slovakia

🇸🇰SlovakSVK
After the fall of communism in 1989, Czechoslovakia adopted the official name Czech and Slovak Federative Republic (, Česká a Slovenská Federatívna Republika; ČSFR) during the period from 23 April 1990 until 31 December 1992, when the country was dissolved into the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

Hyphen

-hyphenatedhyphens
This was met with general disapproval and another round of haggling, dubbed "the hyphen war" (pomlčková válka/vojna) after Slovaks' wish to insert a hyphen into the name (Česko-Slovensko).

Name of the Czech Republic

approved ''CzechiaCzechiaOther languages
This was met with general disapproval and another round of haggling, dubbed "the hyphen war" (pomlčková válka/vojna) after Slovaks' wish to insert a hyphen into the name (Česko-Slovensko).

Second Czechoslovak Republic

CzechoslovakiaSecond RepublicCzechoslovak Republic
However, aggrieved Czechs vehemently opposed it as too reminiscent of such practice during the "Second Republic" (when the official name was "Czecho-Slovak Republic"—which had also been used from 1938 to 1939)--when the country had been mutilated by the Munich Agreement and was slipping toward its final dismemberment at the hands of Nazi Germany a year later.

Munich Agreement

Munich CrisisMunichMunich Conference
However, aggrieved Czechs vehemently opposed it as too reminiscent of such practice during the "Second Republic" (when the official name was "Czecho-Slovak Republic"—which had also been used from 1938 to 1939)--when the country had been mutilated by the Munich Agreement and was slipping toward its final dismemberment at the hands of Nazi Germany a year later.

Nazi Germany

GermanGermanyNazi
However, aggrieved Czechs vehemently opposed it as too reminiscent of such practice during the "Second Republic" (when the official name was "Czecho-Slovak Republic"—which had also been used from 1938 to 1939)--when the country had been mutilated by the Munich Agreement and was slipping toward its final dismemberment at the hands of Nazi Germany a year later.

German occupation of Czechoslovakia

occupation of CzechoslovakiaGerman occupationNazi occupation
However, aggrieved Czechs vehemently opposed it as too reminiscent of such practice during the "Second Republic" (when the official name was "Czecho-Slovak Republic"—which had also been used from 1938 to 1939)--when the country had been mutilated by the Munich Agreement and was slipping toward its final dismemberment at the hands of Nazi Germany a year later.

Orthography

orthographicorthographiesorthographically
The name breaks the rules of Czech and Slovak orthography, which do not use capitalization for proper names' second and further words (see above), nor adjectives derived from them.

Capitalization

capitalizedcapitalisationmixed case
The name breaks the rules of Czech and Slovak orthography, which do not use capitalization for proper names' second and further words (see above), nor adjectives derived from them.

1960 Constitution of Czechoslovakia

1960 Constitutiona new constitutionnew constitution
The 1960 Constitution remained in force on an interim basis.

History of Czechoslovakia (1989–92)

CzechoslovakiaCzech and Slovak Federative RepublicCzech Republic
* History of Czechoslovakia (1989–1992)